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pogophiles

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Everything posted by pogophiles

  1. Here in Nashville, the "Meat & Three Capital of the World", you find both kinds -- most are sit-down table service, but a few are cafeteria-style. It's really hard to pick a favorite, but I tend toward fried chicken, a mixture of turnip & mustard greens, squash casserole, and purple-hull peas. At the peak of summer, though, I tend toward all veggies: fried corn, lima beans, fresh sliced tomatoes and okra...
  2. British/Vietnamese "Phee Phie Pho Phum" Signature Dishes: Ech Chien Bo in the hole; Bo Xao Wellington w/nuac mam chutney
  3. Coastal South Carolina/Scottish "Low Country Highlands" Signature Dishes: Haggis Bog, Oats & Grits
  4. My point is that Memphis is an exception to the rule. Try visiting all the barbecue places in the Nashville area (none of which are attempting whole-hog, to my knowledge), for example, and you will quickly discover that disappointment also exists in styles other than whole-hog...
  5. FG, While I don't disagree with your ranking or the logic behind it, I do disagree with your "any idiot" quote. I've eaten far too much poorly executed shoulder and ribs to believe that "any idiot" can do it right. Your comment leaves the impression that there is little room for variation within these styles, which certainly runs counter to my experience...
  6. pogophiles

    Fried Chicken

    I never brine for fried chicken and I always leave the skin on. Usually I soak the chicken for 3 - 4 hours in whole milk and a dash of Cholula or occasionally in buttermilk (no hot sauce), and then dredge in all-purpose flour seasoned with salt, black pepper and a bit of cayenne. I cook it in a well-seasoned cast iron skillet in vegetable shortening plus a couple of tablespoons of bacon grease until I get a shatteringly-crisp dark mahogony crust. In cutting up the chicken, I only get three pieces from the breast, one of which is the pulleybone (wishbone).
  7. I can think of three reasons for doing this: 1. Cash Flow -- As long as the balance is paid off every month, using the card delays having to actually part with the cash by as much as a full month. 2. Record-Keeping -- Documented evidence of where your money went. 3. Earning rebates from affinity cards -- could be frequent flier miles, discounts from GM, cash rebates at end of year...
  8. I disagree, provided a southern twist is put on the dish (eg. adding scuppernong jelly). I agree that it is not a traditional southern dish, but if you eliminate ingredients not indigenous to the area, then what are we to make of traditional southern dishes that do include such ingredients? I'm thinking specifically of the use of pineapple which does show up in a lot of southern salads and desserts...
  9. I'll probably be branded a heathen for this, but I don't like high, fluffy biscuits. The biscuits I prefer are essentially two crusts with a small pocket of bread between. If the biscuit has sides distinct from the crust, then it has risen too much for me...
  10. If I remember correctly, angel biscuits involve the addition of yeast...
  11. This looks like an appropriate place for one of my favorite food-oriented poems: SONG TO GRITS When my mind's unsettled, When I don't feel spruce, When my nerves get frazzled, When my flesh gets loose -- What knits Me back together's grits. Grits with gravy Grits with cheese. Grits with bacon, Grits with peas. Grits with a minimum Of two over-medium eggs mixed in 'em: um! Grits, grits, it's Grits I sing -- Grits fits In with anything. Rich and poor, black and white, Lutheran and Campbellite, Jews and Southern Jesuits, All acknowledge buttered grits. Give me two hands, give me my wits, Give me forty pounds of grits. Grits at taps, grits at reveille. I am into grits real heavily. True grits, More grits, Fish, grits and collards. Life is good where grits are swallered. Grits Sits Right. -- Roy Blount, Jr.
  12. In addition to mayo, my deviled eggs include dill relish, dijon mustard and a touch of horseradish...
  13. I concur with dlc's mentions of Yellow Porch and Park Cafe. Two places I have tried and enjoyed...
  14. I've never had a great meal in the Opryland Hotel. The hotel really concentrates on convention business. What Nashville does best is in the plate lunch or meat & three arena. Places like Swett's, Arnold's, Sylvan Park, Monell's, Elliston Place Soda Shop, Roteir's, etc... are all good examples of this. If you are looking for something more upscale, there are a lot more choices now, but I have not sampled a lot of them. I would recommend you check out Kay West's restaurant reviews in the Nashville Scene for further guidance. Good luck! Nashville Scene
  15. Another source for good corn meal is Falls Mill in Belvidere, TN Excellent stuff... Falls Mill Product List
  16. Trish -- You should really consider renting a car. Opryland Hotel is in the middle of a vast culinary desert (miles from anywhere you would want to go either for food or for "attractions", save for the hotel itself). You will spend more in cab fare for a couple of trips away from the hotel than you would on the car.
  17. John Egerton's Southern Food and Ronni Lundy's Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken are one's I turn to frequently...
  18. Agree with the "yuck" comment.
  19. pogophiles

    Case-ready beef

    So did they just not have the same problems at their Sam's Clubs? IIRC, they still have butchers on-site...
  20. I think that lighter-bodied whiskeys make better Old Fashioned's. I tend to use Maker's Mark, Jim Beam or even rye whiskey. In my opinion, higher end bourbons (Knob Creek, Booker's, Woodford Reserve, etc..) are best drunk neat -- to me their superior flavors are somewhat wasted when used to make a cocktail...
  21. Strong coffee, preferably fresh-roasted bourbon (Weller is my favorite) rye (prefer Old Overholt) rum (prefer Barbancourt) port (20 yr tawnies or LBV)
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