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caroled

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Everything posted by caroled

  1. Thank you for correcting me. Somehow in my ever aging mind I have always seen a little boy going to the store and as he said to the shopkeeper what he wanted images of them appeared. I could have sworn that there was a potato overhead Must have been all the LSD I did at 6, it was the early 70's ya know!! Good guess on the tuna casserole, but no cigar. Movie also contains catfish,and popcorn.
  2. Thank you for correcting me. Somehow in my ever aging mind I have always seen a little boy going to the store and as he said to the shopkeeper what he wanted images of them appeared. I could have sworn that there was a potato overhead
  3. Million Dollar Baby New one: A radish dug straight out of the clay ← Correct; Gone With the Wind
  4. Here are a few others to ponder: Tuna noodle casserole for Sunday dinner, and hot chocolate and lemon drops before bed. Pie and sausages, POPOVERS and coffee... and everything Real lemon meringue pie, not that stuff out of a can
  5. Naturellement! This one's a TV show:l "A loaf of bread, a container of milk, and a stick of butter." ← Sesame Street? ← I , at 41 can still remember and quote this. Mom is sending her son to the store for a short list of groceries and the items are: A loaf of bread,potato and milk and a stick of butter. I thought I was the only one who ever thought of this reference. Thanks for the memorie.
  6. I am such a doofus!( or the lack of sleep, take your pick ) As soon as I saw #3, I posted a reply and didn't even read the next page of posts to see that someone had already answered it. Sorry edited for lack of sleep!
  7. Huge coconut cake..... When Harry Met Sally
  8. As someone born in 65, I can say that except for the Charleston Chews ( not sure of their heyday) ,the other candies especially FunDip and Pop Rocks, were extremely popular when I was in school in the 70's.
  9. I'm so glad this is still open so that i can also extend my thanks to you and your lovely family for sharing so much of your lives with us this week. It has been a true pleasure to have been given a glimpse of your techinques and abilities from start to finish on some of the end results that we are ususally drooling over in the Dinner thread. Good luck to Mrs C.with the WW program.( I myself am on it and enjoy it very much) I look forward to the future when you can do this again. Carole
  10. Hi I can't get the link to work either, and am not sure of your technique for opening a pomegranate. I have had some success in getting the seeds out by making an incision in the fruit, breaking it open and sitting it in a bowl of cold water for a while. Then rake the seeds out of the hull under running water. Is any of this part of your method??
  11. More sauces – sometimes I stand here and smile quietly to myself. I know how you feel. Everytime I go to one of our asian markets (I am fortunate enough to have 4 within a 6 mile radius of our house) I have to remind myself of just what I came for so that I don't end up with a $100+ bill and not know what to do with 1/2 of it .I always want to buy 1 of everything just to try it! Feeling inspired by your blog I ran out to the nearest one and piced up 6 packs of firm tofu, 1Japanese miso marinated tofu and 1 already fried tofu cake. I have a couple ideas for some of it,curried tofu salad, Japanese tofu salad with sesame,and mapo dofu. How would you handle the rest??
  12. Thank you for that. Chocolate and peppers immediately sprang to mind when I read Busboy's post. I would add turkey, some interesting varieties of beans, some squashes, and sunflower to the list of exports with important culinary influence as well. I would beg to differ on crediting the bulk to the South American continent, though. Chocolate of course is the big hitter there, but remember that large parts of the Southwest were Mexico at one time not too long ago. Most of the other items were being cultivated anywhere there was arable land from the Great Lakes all the way down to the tip of South America. Native Americans were preparing hominy and cornbread in the eastern US since long before the Americas were discovered. If you want the "oldest" American food it would almost have to be some form of cornbread or a corn porridge concoction - tamales would be a great example of early American fast food. A nation of wanderers - both indigenous and imported. It certainly shows in the food. ← Some of the best tamales I have ever had were bought off the back of a pickup truck in the Miss. Delta, Clarksdale ( Morgan Freeman's restuarant Madidi and blues club Ground Zero are there) about 20 years ago.Made by a wonderful older black couple, they would do the cooking in their home and then he would go out to a heavily populated section of 4th Street on a Sat. night and sell whatever happened to be on the menu out of a cooler in the bed of his truck. When he was out he would go home and get more until it was all sold.Some nights tamales, sometimes roast pork sandwiches with slaw and smoked sausages on buns.Always excellent food and so much for the money.My brother to this day will still make and try to duplicate the pork sand.
  13. I have tried the new Hershey's Extra Dark bars. The one with dried cranberries had such small minced pieces that it seemed a waste of time ,no real fruit to sink your teeth into.The one with mint was pretty nice as it was overwhelmingly minty and they also have one called E D with Cinnamon Spice. Not bad but could use a little more cinnamon.
  14. Also, any points values that you could include in your blog would be great. I'm doing WW as well and am always looking for "real" food to enjoy (although I am fortunate in that my leader is not one of those that seems to push the pre-made proccessed food ideas on us) Thanks
  15. Bruce it is so good to be reading your blog.Work has kept me busy and I am just now finding it and have now read it start to finish. I have always found your evening meals to be drool-worthy and the cooking you have done so far this week is no exception. As a GRITS girl, I must say that you have done us proud with the ham hocks and greens. I still have some left in the fridge that Rachel made me a few days ago the I am enjoying immensely. I do have a suggestion for another way to cook them although I don't have an actual recipe for them. When I lived in Alabama, we had a little chinese place in town that was the place to go for a meal out. The chef took the greens and did a chiffonade cutting across the greens so that there was a little piece of the stem in each strip.They were then stir fried along with finely chopped bacon,garlic , chopped onion,super thin matchsticks of carrot and then dressed with a little soy sauce and maybe some fish sauce... you get the idea. Cooking time was very short so that the greens (particularly the stem) retained a bit of their crunchiness.Sooo Gooood.. give that a try sometime. You have everything in your kitchen that you could possibly need to make them. Some nights on my way home from work I'd stop by and get just an order of green to go for my dinner.Man do I miss them Looking forward to what's to come next!
  16. Bravo is showing an eleven episode marathon of season one today. the "final3" episode is the one featuring Harold. Tiffany, and Dave. I'm one of those "lifeless"people and look forward to a new and hopefully interesting challenge.Heres hoping.
  17. Olive Garden reopened it's doors last night Tues. 12-19 after a thorough cleaning with a solution of chlorine bleach and water.supossedly every surface was cleaned with said solution.Local news reported this but didn't say if there were any takers.I'm kind of curious how many people were willing to risk a possible illness just to get that little OG fix
  18. I can recall from my childhood that my grandfather was extremely fond of deer liver.It always looked like beef liver to me. At the time I was not even fond of beef liver, so I was not game enough to try the other.What is wrong with the liver?
  19. Exactly what criteria is used when compiling the test score? That you can get a joke when you see it ,or you are extremely pretencious?? By the way, I got a 40... is that good or bad?
  20. As an Indianapolis resident,I have on one occasion eaten at the Olive Garden in question ,(please, don't think too badly of me ,I was taken as a guest ).While it is not the absolute worst food in the world,in the nearly 6 years I've lived here,that is the only time I've been. I do however know quite a few people who do frequent the place but fortunately none of them had been any time recently and had not succumbed.As anyone in food service knows, food sanitation is the first and foremost thing that can be done on a local level to safeguard the public. From proper cooking and holding temps ,to (and equally important)proper hand washing procedures, the public's safety should be the #1 priority.Unfortunately too many sick employees go to work and put the public at risk.
  21. What were they eating? I noticed it immediately and could not identify the "mound". ← the mound is bamboo and in a related article it said that there was also pickled fern fronds, lychee nuts and something else i can't recall. i did however see enoki in both plates as well. ← pickled daikon
  22. What were they eating? I noticed it immediately and could not identify the "mound". ← the mound is bamboo and in a related article it said that there was also pickled fern fronds, lychee nuts and something else i can't recall. i did however see enoki in both plates as well.
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