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Keith Orr

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Everything posted by Keith Orr

  1. We're lucky here in Portland OR and in most places in the US that we have good water out of the tap. What a blessing to be able to drink, do laundry, take showers in potable water. Portland water is great - I drink a bunch every day. Lot's of my friends use a Britta filter to remove the chlorine. It's asinine to pay more for water than gasoline.
  2. I came across this thread while browsing and though if anybody was still interested I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce 1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes 1 – 14.5 oz can of rice wine vinegar – Used rice wine vinegar again 1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup) 1 cup of finely diced white onion 1/4 cup of yellow mustard 1/3 cup of sugar 2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt 1 teaspoon of black pepper 13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habs before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes) 2 teaspoons curry powder Add 1 cup of water when cooking 5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky. Makes 3 pints - I haven't tried canning it, but I'll bet it would work well. I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.
  3. Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce (Habenero Hot Sauce) I thought I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR called Secret Aardvark Sauce. Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce 1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes or roasted tomatoes chopped - include the juice 1 – 14.5 oz of rice wine vinegar. Use the now empty tomato can to measure 1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup) 1 cup of finely diced white onion 1/4 cup of yellow mustard 1/3 cup of sugar 2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt 1 teaspoon of black pepper 13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habaneros before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes) 2 teaspoons curry powder 1 cup of water when cooking 5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours Note: I used the crockpot so I don't have to worry about scorching it while it cooks. Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky. Makes 3 pints - To can process pint jars in a water bath canner for 15 minutes I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet. Edited for clarity on 11/9/2020 Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Carribean, Condiment, Sauce, Easy, Food Processor ( RG2003 )
  4. There's a place here in Portland OR that makes pretty good corned beef from round. I prefer brisket, but well made, seasoned and cooked it should be better than most corned beef you can buy, but it will be very lean compared to brisket.
  5. I love the Taco Trucks, Trailers, Buses in my area - some of them even drive from place to place to sell to the workers. Take a chance, you'll be glad you did. We even have a "Taco Truck" directory on one of our local food boards here in Portland. http://portlandfood.org/index.php?showtopic=2456
  6. We can get locally grown walnuts here in Western Oregon. They seem bigger and sweeter than most of the commercially available brands which come from California. We crack them as soon as we can and bag them up in one pound bags and store them in the deep freeze. I almost always toast them in the oven before using them. Some folks soak them a time or two in hot water to remove some of the tannins before toasting them - I don't see that much difference in the taste and it seems like a lot of extra work. I like the occasional pecan, but I wonder if they wouldn't be better if I could get a bag of them fresh after harvest to shell and store myself.
  7. ....if you want a killer sherry-brown sugar cured foie gras mousse recipe, let me know. I'd like to see that recipe please.
  8. Keith Orr

    Razor Clams

    Here are a couple of links to recipes from Wildwood, a fine restaurant in Portland OR Both are fancier than the basic flour, eggwash, breadcrums and fry recipe. I've had the first at Wildwood - as good as I've had in a restaurant. The second was just recently published in the local paper and looks to be more of a winter dish. http://www.alaskaharvest.com/Merchant2/mer...ge=ah/PROD/7331 http://www.oregonlive.com/foodday/oregonia...7900.xml&coll=7 A razor clam thread from a Portland Food and Wine Thread: http://portlandfood.org/index.php?showtopic=2215 Years ago as a kid we'd vacation at the Oregon Coast and dig clams. They don't get any better than when you clean them and eat them in sight of the water.
  9. Keith Orr

    Banana Pudding

    Oh, you sneaky bird! Bananas Foster Brooks. ← That sounds better than "Redneck Triffle" which is how I normally refer to it.
  10. Can't recommend Rocket. Two new hot spots - Toro Bravo and Country Cat. Old reliables - Paleys, Park Kitchen, Higgins and Wildwood - All do well with local ingredients. Wine Country - Tina's or Red Hills in Dundee, 3rd Street Bistro or Nick's in McMinnville. I'm not a fan of Joel Palmer House in Dayton - much overrated in my book. Weekend Breakfasts - Genies or on Sunday's Simpatico for Brunch.
  11. Keith Orr

    Banana Pudding

    I like to use a bit of bourbon in my banana pudding - I spritz it on the vanilla wafers - gets them a boozy head start on melting in to the pudding.
  12. Yes! Yes! Yes! I also like another slow cooked method - start to brown some shallots or red onions in some olive oil. Add some trimmed and blanched green beans plus some chopped herbs - I like thyme and cook until they're very tender. Serve with a sprinkle of sea salt and fresh ground pepper.
  13. Blackwood Canyon is gone. They swung for the fences and often struck out, but when they connected there were some amazing wines, especially dessert styles. I've had some very good older Chateau St. Michelle wines too - I'm not such a big fan of all of their newer reds though. Thanks for the report
  14. I'm with Ray on the diamond hone - I have coarse, medium, fine and extra fine. I use the coarse on axes only these days. The medium I only use when taking out a nick or on somebody else's dull knives to get them closer to the fine and extra fine for finished edges. Get a regular cut F. Dick steel to hone the knife every time you use it to keep the edge up. I've got Japanese water stones, ceramic, carborundum and natural stones carefully stored away in my tool box. I also do it free hand.
  15. I love the www.frenchlaundryathome.com That woman's got chops, a sense of humor and I like the wine and music accompaniments. I like the idea of cooking a recipe from each cookbook in my collection. I'd probably decide to get rid of many of them rather than bother them.
  16. I also like the Paul Kirk books. There is also an excellent website dedicated to Weber Bullets that has excellent BBQ tips and recipes and an online BBQ course. http://virtualweberbullet.com/ Practice, Practice, Practice! Even your lesser efforts will be better than 99% of what you can buy.
  17. They used to grow lots of prunes for drying here in the Willamette Valley. The common variety was called Brooks Prunes. My neighbor used to have tree of French Prunes, smaller and redder, not purple black. . Never heard of them being called dried plums - I always think of plums as juicier - sometimes labeled Japanese Plums. There is a source in Dayton OR that is wonderful and currently sold out - http://bowyerfarms.com/ I'm looking forward to hearing how your candied cherries turn out.
  18. They used to serve breakfast years ago here in Oregon. My kids used to love another excuse to go to Wendy's
  19. Peroxide often works on organic stains
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