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Brett Emerson

Jamón ibérico de bellota in the US

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Chef Andrés, I recently bought some of the excellent chorizo ibérico de bellota from La Tienda and noticed that your name is on the package. Can you share with us the story of your involvement bringing the legendary ibérico pork products into the US?

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Chef Andrés, I recently bought some of the excellent chorizo ibérico de bellota from La Tienda and noticed that your name is on the package. Can you share with us the story of your involvement bringing the legendary ibérico pork products into the US?

For long time it has been my dream of seeing Spanish products everywhere in to America. I want to go to a supermarket in Jackson Wyoming and find pimenton! Sinece I arrive 15 years ago I have been trying to sell Spain. We can say I have dedicated myself to telling our story. It cannot be that we have many wonderful products, cheeses like cabrales, jamon, saffron, rice and no one know about it. So I have been talking and talking and slowly, little bit at a time people in America have been discovering and later asking for these products......

To me iberico is like icon, the icon of Spain, a luxury product like caviar or something. So good you think man! I thoguht this was THE product to really sell Spain..... So what happen? I have been telling the story, preaching the gospel of iberico all over America......

I work on creating the interest but ultimately there was a limit to what I can do personally. Has to be the government, has to be the producer, has to be the importer involve in this process to make it move........So I look for a partner, someone who produce the iberico, and I found this man called Santiago Martin in small town of La Alberca. His family company Fermin makes iberico. Sanitago was the one to bring ibercio to Japan! This was my guy.........Then I look for someone to bring it and sell it in America. Someone who knows how to bring imported product and sell them and can make it a success. I find the people at Rogers Collection....they each do their piece and me I still do what I do I keep talking about iberico. Just I try to open doors and move things, a facilatator

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docsconz   

Thank you, Jose. That is a wonderful thing. In addition to the Iberico, I have seen other pork products such as lomo and chorizos. Many of the justly famous Spanish canned products can be imported here and are available, though not widely. Are there any other unique Spanish products that you are working to facilitate entry to the US and North American markets?

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Dorine   
Thank you, Jose. That is a wonderful thing.  In addition to the Iberico, I have seen other pork products such as lomo and chorizos. Many of the justly famous Spanish canned products can be imported here and are available, though not widely. Are there any other unique Spanish products that you are working to facilitate entry to the US and North American markets?

You and I know the kinds of vendors in our own cities that sell this kind of product and would be open to selling Spanish items.

Philadelphia has at least a dozen outlets where Spanish products would sell well. There are places where those of us who know the products can publish recipes and reviews to encourage people to buy them.

Some of also are aware of places in cities across the country where such products would be appreciated.

Maybe Spain needs somebody to commit to a year of visiting these places and raising awareness! I'm open to the job if anybody is interested!

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