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stephen wall

L'Ambroisie

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Holly_L, thanks for sharing your great pictures during your visit to Paris

I think only chuck_eats that's comparable in eating at some many starred restaurants consecutively as far as I'm concerned

Have you got any chances to walk around the whole 3 dining-rooms at L'Ambroisie (front, centre and back)? Are there any characteristic differences? I only visited there once and was seated at the front. Those morels ... yummy and very generous. I also ate the navarin de homard ... excellent, but I still slightly prefer the Arpege's homard au vin jaune


Edited by Bu Pun Su (log)

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I think only chuck_eats that's comparable in eating at some many starred restaurants consecutively as far as I'm concerned

And lets not forget Liz Haskell. She gives most a run for their money in consecutive dining.


Robert R

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"Generous" is one way of looking at it, and a big pile of morels it was.

But... it was 120E for the dish. Ouch. And I have to say, I wasn't blown away. The sea bass with caviar sauce (pictured upthread) was the best dish of the meal for me.

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Oh ya ... Andy or Ian, you have not told us yet about your "bad" experience at L'Ambroisie :cool:

Who has the best morels in Paris in the Spring? I mean, which restaurants?

Robert40, you're right ... I forgot about Liz. Perhaps, since she's not as active as before

Does Pacaud cook best for seafood, fish, red meat or poultry? I know it will be subjective ...

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Bu Pun Su asked

Have you got any chances to walk around the whole 3 dining-rooms at L'Ambroisie (front, centre and back)? Are there any characteristic differences?

and

Who has the best morels in Paris in the Spring? I mean, which restaurants?

and

Does Pacaud cook best for seafood, fish, red meat or poultry? I know it will be subjective ...

I have always been seated in what I understand to be the center room. For lunch, at least, I like it, because there are windows (no good view though, just a not particularly attractive courtyard), so you get some natural light. It's my impression that this room is also done up in somewhat warmer colors than the front room, although I'll admit I am not the best at making and remembering these sorts of observations. There are tapestries or some other sort of wall hangings in the middle room. As for the back room, if it is the room I am thinking of, it appears to be something like a private party room, which just one larger table. There were diners there one time when I was there. I have also been in that room, because there is also another restroom back there, and the servers have ushered me to it when the back room was not otherwise in use. Again, I'm not the most observant on this front, but the style is more like the second room, as I recall.

Best morels - I don't know; certainly good, and as indicated above, insanely generous portions at L'Ambroisie; but I also had good morels at other restaurants. Someone who knows more than me should chime in here.

Your last question is indeed subjective; and I have only been to L'Ambroisie in the spring, so have not had the opportunity to try, for example, Pacaud's game, about which I hear good things. Although I had very high praise for the chicken above, I think overall I might say that Pacaud has a particularly fine hand with fish. That is, the langoustines with curry is a great dish, but I have probably had langoustines as good or almost as good elsewhere. Same with the lobster. But the fish dishes I have had really stand above fish I have had elsewhere, excepting perhaps, now that I think of it, L'Arpege, where I have had fish that is probably equally good.


Edited by HOLLY_L (log)

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Are the lunch carte prices and dinner the same? I really wish that I could actually "ENTRE" into the website. I think that button is just cosmetic. :huh:


Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Yes they are -- there's no good value at l'Ambroisie, ever, no prix fixe, just the regular ALC stellar items. And that website is fiction indeed. I'm not even sure it's from the actual l'Ambroisie, I suspect it was some designer teasing them into paying for making a website. You'll have to rely on food bloggers for extracts from the carte. There are usually four or five "entrées", "poissons" and "viandes" and it's hard to eat three courses for less than 280eur. (which happens to be the price of the truffled roast chicken, if I'm not mistaken, so it's easy to eat for much more.)

There's also a Facebook group which is not a bad place for information.

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Most 3 star restaurants including l'Ambrosie source their morels from Turkeys which does have excellent morels. Frechon at Le Bristol feels the Turkish morels are however not the best so he sources his from Auvergne in France. On my last visit there I can clearly say that these morels, very small compared to the Turkish, are definately superior to those at L'Ambrosie (which are excellent). However, Frechon does not have any special morels dishes that I know of, and I guess he could never source enough to do the things Pacaud does.

We got our morels when ordering the chicken roasted in pigs bladder. Not huge amounts but again the quality is something I will dream about for many years.

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Robyn and her husband took us to l'Ambroisie last week. It was a wonderful evening and left me with no doubt that l'Ambroisie is a genuine French treasure. Thank them. But it also left me with two certainties:

- Maybe as a result of Mathieu Pacaud gradually taking over from his father, the perfection that used to be the trademark of l'Ambroisie is not there anymore -- eg the foie gras was with old stingy pepper, the girolles were tasteless, the seabass was slightly overcooked, the lobster not slightly, the peaches were not ripe enough. Nothing particularly off-putting or substandard, but l'Ambroisie that I visited is just not as good as l'Ambroisie it was once.

- Regardless, the place is unique, but its concept itself is beyond expensive: this is a infinitely refined eating house for very wealthy people -- wealthy to the exact extent that they don't care about the price. L'Ambroisie is better appreciated as a regular. It's not only that they treat regulars better (they do), it's also that the simplicity of the meal, its limitations, the way they adapt to their clients: everything points to the same idea that you have to come every month and not care about the money to fully enjoy this incredible place. In a word, it's a club.

It's not a disapointment. Just a realization that the very concept of this restaurant makes it out of my league.

I put a more detailed report with some stolen pictures here.


Edited by julot-les-pinceaux (log)

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I really didn't care so much about the money (our hotel room at the George V cost 860 euros a night - and it was worth every euro we paid for it). I wound up thinking there was perhaps something wrong with the restaurant - or perhaps the way we approached the restaurant. I'm not sure now - and never will be.

Whatever - I didn't care for the service (in terms of attitude). I disliked it when the maitre d' looked down his nose at my husband and asked if he knew what some kind of offal was before offering his opinions about whether it was a good choice (I guess he thought my husband was looking for a steak). And I thought a lot of the food was "blah". Note that I like traditional French food - but the little red fish (forget the name) on a bed of minced mushrooms was almost tasteless. I had those little red fish a couple of times at a couple of places at various price levels - and my favorite was the little red fish on a bed of braised spinach at a one knife and fork kind of place.

Just as an aside - I had dorade on multiple occasions - and it was always a good choice (if you like fish). Although my husband's bar at Guy Savoy was the hands-down winner in terms of fish courses we ate.

At the prices l'Ambroisie charges - the food should sing - and it barely hummed. Unfortunately - since I don't live in/near Paris - I will never know from multiple visits whether we got the most we could have gotten from that restaurant.

Finally - regarding the concept of regulars - I can well appreciate it. And disagree somewhat with Julot. Good/great restaurants everywhere depend on regulars (when we dined at Guy Savoy - everyone in our dining room was a regular except for us). I don't mind if restaurants won't book the whole restaurant with tourists 3 months in advance to accommodate regulars - or if regulars get somewhat better treatment. But non-regulars should be treated well at these places too. Like guests at a private club they dine at perhaps once in a lifetime. I do feel that I got that nice treatment - that special feeling - at Guy Savoy - but did not at l'Ambroisie. C'est la vie. Robyn

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I really didn't care so much about the money (our hotel room at the George V cost 860 euros a night - and it was worth every euro we paid for it).  I wound up thinking there was perhaps something wrong with the restaurant - or perhaps the way we approached the restaurant.  I'm not sure now - and never will be.

Whatever - I didn't care for the service (in terms of attitude).  I disliked it when the maitre d' looked down his nose at my husband and asked if he knew what some kind of offal was before offering his opinions about whether it was a good choice (I guess he thought my husband was looking for a steak).  And I thought a lot of the food was "blah".  Note that I like traditional French food - but the little red fish (forget the name) on a bed of minced mushrooms was almost tasteless.  I had those little red fish a couple of times at a couple of places at various price levels - and my favorite was the little red fish on a bed of braised spinach at a one knife and fork kind of place.

Just as an aside - I had dorade on multiple occasions - and it was always a good choice (if you like fish).  Although my husband's bar at Guy Savoy was the hands-down winner in terms of fish courses we ate.

At the prices l'Ambroisie charges - the food should sing - and it barely hummed.  Unfortunately - since I don't live in/near Paris - I will never know from multiple visits whether we got the most we could have gotten from that restaurant.

Finally - regarding the concept of regulars - I can well appreciate it.  And disagree somewhat with Julot.  Good/great restaurants everywhere depend on regulars (when we dined at Guy Savoy - everyone in our dining room was a regular except for us).  I don't mind if restaurants won't book the whole restaurant with tourists 3 months in advance to accommodate regulars - or if regulars get somewhat better treatment.  But non-regulars should be treated well at these places too.  Like guests at a private club they dine at perhaps once in a lifetime.  I do feel that I got that nice treatment - that special feeling - at Guy Savoy - but did not at l'Ambroisie.  C'est la vie.   Robyn

Merry and I were in Paris last week. Report to follow but I would like to add to the comments without appearing to " pile on ".

We ate at L'Amboise last year with a "regular". In winter with black truffle season. The food was in the "to be expected excellent". The truffle dishes were the only outstanding dishes.

I would only say that my wife had similar feelings to Robyn. The service was condecending, the atmosphere was so dark and dreary and serious. That environment seemed to stiffle what I would call the holistic pleasureable participation of the diners with the food, the staff and the restuarant. Unlike Guy Savoy( since it is mentioned above) which has a bright playful beautiful dining space designed for intimacy and an attentive staff that share their pride in the food they serve with the guests.

The price quality ratio, experience and difficulty of reservation will not get us back compared to others in a similar category. "Every system is designed to achieve the results it gets" so as Julot says it is more of a club.

Sandy

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My wife and I were fortunate enough to eat at l'Ambroisie last May during our Honeymoon in Paris. It was our first 3-star dining experience and it was certainly memorable. We were, of course, eating there when the exchange rate with the US dollar was horrible, but there wasn't much we could do about it. We did try and eat there for lunch in the hope that it might be a big cheaper, but it certainly wasn't. Here's what we had:

Me

1 - Feuillantine de langoustines aux graines de sesame, sauce au curry

2 - Noix de ris de veau braisee a la "financiere", etuvee de morilles a la creme

3 - Biscuit dacquoise au praline, giboulee de fraises de jardin

My wife

1 - Salade de homard et brunoise de legumes printaniere, mousseline a la badiane

2 - Escalopines de bar a l'emince d'artichat, caviar oscietre gold

3 - Tarte fine sablee au cacao, glace a la vanille

We also had a bottle of Meursault and some champagne (Roederer Crystal of course!). That all came to a total of 739E (OUCH). It's an incredibly beautiful restaurant in a beautiful area (Place de Vosges), which just happened to be a couple blocks from our hotel in the Marais. The service was also excellent and the chef was kind enough to sign a menu for us since it was obviously a special occasion for us. Unfortunately we did not bring our camera with us to the lunch, which is a decision I regret.

Of course the food was unbelievable and certainly the best meal either of us ever had. My wife still talks about the sea bass with caviar and I can still remember those succulent veal sweetbreads with perfect morels. As I told my friends later: it was worth the cost.

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For anyone curious to see some recent menu prices...

L’AMBROISIE

L’HIVER

Jan 10, 2009

Aspic de foie gras de canard landais, remoulade de céleri et truffe 118€

Feuillantine de langoustines aux graines de sésame, sauce au curry 94€

Velouté de topinambours aux noix de Saint-Jacques, émulsion à la truffe 130€

Fines feuilles croustillantes aux escargots, fondue de roquette, crème a la réglisse 82€

Oeufs mollets au cresson, sabayon à la truffe 110€

Fricassée de homard sauce civet, purée Saint-Germain 142€

Dos de sole filet braisé au vermouth, salsifis glacés, caviar osciètre gold 148€

Escalopines de bar poelées, artichaut etuvé à la truffe 135€

Saint-pierre laqué aux sucs de pomme, mousseline de céleri et granny-smith 90€

Suggestion du jour selon arrivage

Noix de ris de veau glacée au jus, céleri-rave confit en demi-deuil 138€

Salmis de pigeon aux épines-vinettes, chou vert braisé au vin jaune 98€

Carré d’agneau de lait de Lozére au poivre gris, salmigondis de légumes à la coriandre 92€

Volaille de Bresse rotie de truffe, charlotte parmentière (2 pers.) 260€

Feuilleté de truffe « bel humeur », salade de mache à la crème 240€

Fromage frais et affinés 35€

Tarte fine sablée au cacao amer, glace à la vanille 30€

Biscuit chaud et sorbet à la mandarine 32€

Palet lacté aux marrons glacés, sauce moka 38€

Arlettes caramélisées au fromage blanc, citron confits 30€

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Hi,

I was at l'Ambroisie for lunch in January.

Please click here for my full review with photographs: Here

Sorry for not reproducing it here...but it is quite long.

My menu:

Amuse Bouche 1: Comté gougères

Amuse Bouche 2: Velouté de butternut avec crème fouettée de truffes blanche

Entrée: Corolle de noix de Saint-Jacques et brocoli à la truffe blanche d’Alba

Plat Principal 1: Escalopines de bar à l’émincé d’artichaut, caviar oscietre gold

Plat Principal 2: Feuilleté de truffe fraîche ‘bel humeur’

Pre dessert: Sorbet poire William

Dessert 1: Arlettes caramélisées fromage blanc, citron et pamplemousse confits

Dessert 2: Tarte fine sablée au cacao amer, glace à la vanille

Petit Fours: Madeleine à la vanille; truffe chocolat; tartelette Normandie; macaron citron; et tuile d’amandes


Food Snob

foodsnob@hotmail.co.uk

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Hi,

I was at l'Ambroisie for lunch in January.

Please click here for my full review with photographs: Here

Sorry for not reproducing it here...but it is quite long.

My menu:

Amuse Bouche 1: Comté gougères

Amuse Bouche 2: Velouté de butternut avec crème fouettée de truffes blanche

Entrée: Corolle de noix de Saint-Jacques et brocoli à la truffe blanche d’Alba

Plat Principal 1: Escalopines de bar à l’émincé d’artichaut, caviar oscietre gold

Plat Principal 2: Feuilleté de truffe fraîche ‘bel humeur’

Pre dessert: Sorbet poire William

Dessert 1: Arlettes caramélisées fromage blanc, citron et pamplemousse confits

Dessert 2: Tarte fine sablée au cacao amer, glace à la vanille

Petit Fours: Madeleine à la vanille; truffe chocolat; tartelette Normandie; macaron citron; et tuile d’amandes


Food Snob

foodsnob@hotmail.co.uk

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So in 100 words of less, what did you think? :cool:

If you plan to write so extensively about all the places you ate at in Paris this time, you've got your work cut out for you, my friend. :raz:

Did you like l'Ambroisie better than l'Arpege? I know you've not yet written about that one, but a simple yes or no will suffice. :wink:

What is your current favorite 3* in Paris?


Edited by tupac17616 (log)

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So in 100 words of less, what did you think?  :cool:

If you plan to write so extensively about all the places you ate at in Paris this time, you've got your work cut out for you, my friend.  :raz:

Did you like l'Ambroisie better than l'Arpege?  I know you've not yet written about that one, but a simple yes or no will suffice.  :wink:

What is your current favorite 3* in Paris?

It's hard to put in so little words...or more rightly, it is hard to do the effect that the food had on me justice in so few.

Basically, it was possibly one of the most singular reactions I have ever had to a meal - confused, then impressed, then, to an extent, wowed.

l'Arpege or l'Ambroisie? You're not doing me any favours this morning! That is very difficult to answer.

I think I am a little biased - l'Arpege certainly holds a special place in my heart. I think it is possibly my favourite restaurant anywhere.

l'Ambroisie is not far behind...but I am judging it on only one visit, whilst I am fortunate enough to have eaten at l'Arpege three times.


Food Snob

foodsnob@hotmail.co.uk

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Hi all,

I have a quick question for those of you familiar with the restaurant. I will be in Paris later this week, and obviously have missed any type of month/2-month advanced reservation window. Provided I am not too jet-lagged and want to get a table for Saturday lunch, do I have a reasonable chance of getting in if I call the morning of?

Thanks.

Also, it looks like the website has finally evolved past an address page, and is actually pretty nice.

http://www.ambroisie-placedesvosges.com/restaurant.php


Edited by AEK (log)

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I went last summer on a Friday afternoon and the place was deserted. Actually if it hadn't been for us and Gilles Pudlowski who was probably grunging, I think that might have been it except for one other table. How many people are going there these days, anyway? It was a milestone for me and my wife: we broke the $1000. mark for the first time in 34 years of Michelin three-star meals, but due in part to a bottle of Charmes-Chambertin. I was surprised to see half the number of dishes on the menu that I bet Pecaud offered at his peak; and some Asian influences crept in, possibly the influence of his son? Nonetheless, it was a really good meal in one of the remaining restaurants that still smack of the golden age of dining.


Edited by robert brown (log)

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Hi all,

I have a quick question for those of you familiar with the restaurant.  I will be in Paris later this week, and obviously have missed any type of month/2-month advanced reservation window.  Provided I am not too jet-lagged and want to get a table for Saturday lunch, do I have a reasonable chance of getting in if I call the morning of?

Thanks.

Also, it looks like the website has finally evolved past an address page, and is actually pretty nice. 

http://www.ambroisie-placedesvosges.com/restaurant.php

Thanks for the update about the website. Your chances on a saturday are less good than any other day, including for lunch because this is one of the only three star restaurants open saturday for lunch (actually it was the only one until Le Bristol got the third star, I think).

But as Robert suggest, in those recessive times, people tend to fight less to spend 400+€ on a meal.

I must say that the place seems dead to me, except apparently for its fortunate regulars and long-time diners. But I do have orgasmic memories.

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I will not put a long introduction here as everyone’s pretty much knowledgeable about this restaurant – one of the most often discussed places in any forums

Food (and wine) - 97/100

When I visited L’Ambroisie this year, I thought that in the late Sep/early Oct, the game season or white truffle season already starts. As I saw the menu … well, it’s still in the summer. Everybody knows that the 1st half of 2008, the commodity prices shot to the roof and it’s no exception here. Almost everything increases 10-15% (both food and wine), the curry langoustine is almost EUR 95, hot-cold egg with caviar (> EUR 130). Did anyone ever try egg (non-truffle season), John Dory or pigeon dish here? How are they? I didn’t dare to order since I hardly heard that someone said they’re great

There are 2 dishes that I really wanted to try – Bar with caviar and artichoke as well as any lobster dish (different preparation than the one with new potatoes). I love both of them very much. The sea bass (demi-portion) is pure and delicate with creamy caviar sauce (not soggy at all), a well-balanced dish. Equally as good is the lobster dish – Pacaud liked served the lobster in the firm texture, the lobster juice with sweet & silky anise sauce is simply irresistible. It’s served with carrots, leeks and zucchinis; it’s simple and delicious (though it may look complicated since so many things are there). Lastly, I had a half-portion of lamb (glad to do that) … by itself, it’s a nice dish especially the skin but I find it has too much fat – the meat is not that much. Too bad that I’ve tasted better lamb somewhere else (such as Troisgros’ lamb loin or Passard’s T-bone) that makes this dish not really outstanding.

The dessert here could easily cost EUR 35-40 each, I already exceeded my budget so I decided to skip it this time (monsieur Pascal was a bit surprised). For the cheese … somehow I’m never interested in the cheese selection here. To accompany my dishes, I had a half-bottle of ’98 Chateau Kirwan grand cru - it's seductive with rounded palate and has black olive aromas, but no secondary development. This wine is not too strong, so it still goes well even with fish or sea food dishes. This Bordeaux is well-crafted and enjoyable to drink after 2007 indeed. Another good meal here … 97/100 (3* for food – as good as Gagnaire & Le Louis XV)

Service (and ambiance) - 93/100

I was seated in the middle dining room this time (more than half of the guests are seated here as a matter of fact). It’s more spacious and beautiful than the front one with crystal chandeliers and large, colorful tapestries – there are tall gilded mirrors in between. Overall, the service is professional. Monsieur Pascal and LeMoullac somehow recognized me that I had visited this place before while the rests are just fine – they do what they need to do but no flair. Dining at L’Ambroise (and possibly L’Astrance) is all about the food and wine – not much about overall dining experience, no outstanding service (like in Ducasse’s or Arpege) or particularly “wow” décor (like in Le Meurice or other palace restaurants). Put that aside, for me, it’s still in my top 5-7 of world’s best restaurants. I graded 96/100 (strong 2 ¾* for general experience – this should stay as long as Pacaud is not retired). Here what I ate, L'Ambroise pictures 08

For more details review, L'Ambroise review 08


Edited by Bu Pun Su (log)

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Bu Pun Su - Glad you enjoyed your meal. Two quick slightly off topic comments. If you like bar - my husband had a terrific one at lunch at Guy Savoy. If you like pigeon - I had a great Bresse pigeon at lunch at Gordon Ramsay RHR. Don't know if these items are still on the menus at those restaurants - but you might take a look next time you are in Paris or London.

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Hi Robyn,

Thanks for the info, I will check them out if I get a chance in the future. I know you're a big fan of Guy Savoy :biggrin:

My favorite fish is actually turbot, I'd love to try Gagnaire's version (or Roellinger's but it's no longer there)

Whereas for poultry, either Pacaud's or Frechon's chicken but they always require 2 people sadly

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Better late than never, I hope. Here's an excerpt from my blog post about a meal I had at l'Ambroisie in December, 2008. Photos and (much) more reading can be had at the ulterior epicure.

... I admit that I misunderstood Pacaud’s intentions at the table and in the days that followed. At the time, his style (and the astronomical prices) struck me as ostentatious and self-righteous. But, as weeks passed and I was allowed to reflect on my meal, I realized that Pacaud’s cooking is quite selfless. It showers the diner with attention, slathering and saddling them with a thick coat of luxury falling just shy of suffocation.

The white truffles at l’Ambroisie, for example, were top-shelf. And they’re shaved with a hyper and happy hand.

Madame Pacaud, perhaps the cheeriest face in Place des Vosges, presented us with a glass jar bearing a white truffle the size of a baseball (it had been trimmed pretty evenly around, so I can only imagine its original size). The smell (which penetrated the glass before she opened the jar) knocked me horizontal. Heads turned from all corners of the room.

And caviar – golden oscietra the size of large game shot – was dispensed in eye-popping quantities.

Done on any smaller of a scale, Pacaud’s cooking would seem smug. Colored with just the slightest shade of modernity, it would feel false. Rather, it’s confident and comfortable in its largesse.

Yet, in its generosity, his food remains guarded and reserved. The plating is very controlled and manipulated: everything is plated with circular symmetry. It does not invite an open discussion, insisting, instead, on intimacy. There is no table-side shaving or saucing. Everything is plated in the kitchen. What arrives is the completed work.

There’s a sense of loneliness and sadness about it all. Pacaud has not the joie de vivre of Guy Savoy, or the playful imagination of le Squer at Ledoyen. The morbid service aside, Pacaud’s dishes seemed designed to be your last (and not because there’s a heart attack waiting with the final tab). It’s not depressing food necessairly, but it makes you eat very slowly and deliberately.

...

My initial reaction to l’Ambrosie was one of ambivalence. It had its highs, which were very high (sea bass, the chocolate tart, and the butternut veloute). And there were lows - like the lobster and the mint sorbet - which aren’t hard to have when prices are so incredibly high (I mean, we were essentially clearing through whole tasting menus’-worth of money with each dish).

So here’s the question I’ve asked myself repeated over the last four months:  Why, more than any meal I had on this trip to Europe - more than l’Arpege and The Sportsman, both of which left a very deep impression on me - does l’Ambroisie haunt me the most?  It throbs in my memory.

Perhaps, when you spend that much money and invest that much hope into something, you wed yourself forever to it as the faithful worshiper out of a fear of having been played the fool, no?

Or maybe, l’Ambroisie is a temple - a place of reverence, worship, and religiosity - wherein a glint of ecstasy can be glimpsed.

Here is what we had:

Amuses Bouches

Gougeres

Velouté de Butternut

First Courses

Corolle de noix de Saint-Jacques

et broccoli à la truffe blanche d’Alba

Oeufs mollets à la Florentine

râpée de trufe blanche d’Alba

Main Courses

Escalopines de Bar

à l’émincé d’artichaut, caviar osciètre gold

Fricassée de Homard à la Diable

châtaignes et potimarron

“Gibier français Selon a Chasse”

Perdreaux rotis avec truffe noire

Pre Dessert

Sorbet Menthe

Desserts

Tarte Fine Sablée au Cacao Amer

glace à la vanille

-

“Assortiment de Desserts et Pâtisseries”

Sablée Praliné aux Coings

(crème fouettée à la cannelle)

Arlettes Caramélisées au Fromage Blanc

(crème success)

Tarte Fine Sable au Cocao Amer

(glace à la vanilla)

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Mignardises


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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