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What a coincidence...speaking of wine and Bluestem, I just found a local source (Red X) that carries Belle Pente Pinot Noir that Colby paired with an entree for me earlier in the year.  Loved it, never saw it for sale anywhere, and forgot all about it until I saw it on the shelf yesterday.

Now that you're located in that neck of the woods, you will be amazed at the breadth of the offerings at Red X. I never cease to be amazed; I can search and search for something all over the city and lo and behold, there it is on the shelf. And Clayton, the manager there, is extremely helpful -- if they don't already have it, he'll usually track it down and order it for you.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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We hope before the first of the year. The front should be done in the next couple of weeks. As for the doorway connecting the two spaces we are just waitng for the city people to do their job. The kitchen will be finished after the lounge is up and running. We are very excited.  :biggrin:

Colby

I don't suppose you would care to give the society members a preview of what types of dishes you're thinking of serving in the "new space" (are you just calling it "The Wine Bar at bluestem" or...?). And maybe we can help design the special service pieces you'll be using. Oh, wait, wrong thread. Sorry. :biggrin:

And will the new menu be offered all the time or will there be a different menu for lunch and dinner?

"Many people believe the names of In 'n Out and Steak 'n Shake perfectly describe the contrast in bedroom techniques between the coast and the heartland." ~Roger Ebert

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We hope before the first of the year. The front should be done in the next couple of weeks. As for the doorway connecting the two spaces we are just waitng for the city people to do their job. The kitchen will be finished after the lounge is up and running. We are very excited.  :biggrin:

Colby

LoL! Judy

We have been toying around with these crazy surfaces to put food on called something like.......PLATES! :laugh:

We are going to do a small menu of about 10 items. Such as smoke salmon, mussels, maybe foie, paninis etc... Everthing will be around $10. The idea is to give customers a taste of bluestem without commiting to a entire meal. And quite frankly I want to serve food that I want to eat when I go out for a drink. The dinner menu will be offered in the dining room only. Desserts will be offered on both sides. No smoking. I hope I dont regret that. I honestly would like to develop an industry following and we all know how some industry people are with smoking.

BTW we are open only for dinner. No lunch plans in the future.

Colby

“Nobody can be so amusingly arrogant as a young man who has just discovered an old idea and thinks it is his own." - Sydney J. Harris

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I would really like to visit and have the tasting menu, but am wondering if you may be able to accomodate my fiancee's non-fish vegetarian needs for a tasting menu so she could accompany me?  thanks.

Absolutely. Just let us know when you make a reservation that you would like a vegeterian menu.

“Nobody can be so amusingly arrogant as a young man who has just discovered an old idea and thinks it is his own." - Sydney J. Harris

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We hope before the first of the year. The front should be done in the next couple of weeks. As for the doorway connecting the two spaces we are just waitng for the city people to do their job. The kitchen will be finished after the lounge is up and running. We are very excited.  :biggrin:

Colby

LoL! Judy

We have been toying around with these crazy surfaces to put food on called something like.......PLATES! :laugh:

We are going to do a small menu of about 10 items. Such as smoke salmon, mussels, maybe foie, paninis etc... Everthing will be around $10. The idea is to give customers a taste of bluestem without commiting to a entire meal. And quite frankly I want to serve food that I want to eat when I go out for a drink. The dinner menu will be offered in the dining room only. Desserts will be offered on both sides. No smoking. I hope I dont regret that. I honestly would like to develop an industry following and we all know how some industry people are with smoking.

BTW we are open only for dinner. No lunch plans in the future.

Colby

This brings fond memories of the good ol days with Adega in Denver... glad to see something like this in KC.

"cuisine is the greatest form of art to touch a human's instinct" - chairman kaga

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  • 4 weeks later...

My family and I had a tremendous dinner last night.

3 of us are vegetarians, and Chef Colby and the service staff did a magnificent job in accomodating us.

We all did the tasting.

perhaps a more detailed report later...

Time past and time future

What might have been and what has been

Point to one end, which is always present.

- T.S. Eliot

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My family and I had a tremendous dinner last night.

3 of us are vegetarians, and Chef Colby and the service staff did a magnificent job in accomodating us.

We all did the tasting.

perhaps a more detailed report later...

So glad to hear you had a nice veg experience. I recognize the limitations of some restos in accommodating dietary restrictions and predilections, but I think everyone has to applaud those chefs who embrace gourmands of all stripes and endeavor to include them in the "big tent" that is haute cuisine.

Colby & Co, you rock. Foodexile, I hope you'll provide us with a report when your schedule allows.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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I am unable to write reviews like many of you.

So this will be a bare-bones writeup.

Room was packed on a Friday night and only started to empty out around 11, as we finished up.

Meal lasted a good 2 1/2 hours. The server, who was great (I only wish I remembered her name - I think it was Dena), apologized for the slow pacing, but I thought it was perfect.

Like I said, I had contacted Chef Colby and friends ahead of time, and he set us up with a great menu. I have some of it written up, some of it from memory. May be a few errors.

Amuse:

- Chilled Soba with Abalone Mushroom.

- Salsify Veloute and Huile de Noix

- Apple Juice with Szechuan pepper

Great way to start. The veloute was terrific - velvety, smooth, delicious. Juice was very cleansing - I only wonder if the pepper flavor could have been stronger. Soba noodles were fantastic - nutty but not heavy. All together, the amuse was great.

Course 1:

Winter White Asparagus, Quail Egg "En Brioche," Warm Mayonnaise, Winter Radish

Where did you all find the radishes? They were great, so fresh and so, pardon me, "radishy." Asparagus and Mayo were good alongisde. I was the only one who had the Quail Egg, and I'm glad I did. I think it was fried in a wonton-like wrapper. Was not runny, and the egg flavor was a great complement.

Course 2:

Chestnut Soup, Creme de Truffle, Ginger, Apple Vinegar Emulsion

Best dish of the night. Best soup of my life. Won't say much more. Soup was smooth and delicious. Everything was perfect.

Course 3:

Roast Heirloom Beets, Crosnes and Turnips, Root Spinach, Polenta, Pomegranate

This was my companions' favorite. The beets were roasted beautifully, and the crosnes (not sure how to describe) were exotic and quite good. Polenta was better than any I have made (perfect texture) and who knew polenta's perfect mate was pomegranate?

Course 4:

Raviolo, Mushroom Ragout, Red Wine Reduction

This was the most traditional dish and worked well at this point in the meal. Deep flavors and nicely prepared mushrooms. The raviolo contained an egg, and the runny yolk made the whole dish taste that much more luxurious.

Course 5:

Warm Potato Salad with Black Perigord Truffle

I don't love black truffles for some reason. Maybe I'm not refined enough, but I can't get myself to love them. Still, this was a nice way to finish. The warm potatoes were on a bed of mashed potatoes (or perhaps pureed potatoes). Very good.

Dessert:

Don't remember exactly. Was a chocolate suflee cake with a chocolate puddingish mousseish. Truly fantastic. As full as I was, I ate all of it.

We each got a lavendar truffle at the end.

Wine: A great rhone, a fantastic Chateau Neuf-du-Pape

I'm no wine expert. Our server picked these, and her choices were perfect. They went quite well with the food.

Overall a terrific experience. Bluestem is such a high-caliber restaurant, and I will be there the next time I'm in KC, especially now that I know the kitchen will take such good care of us, even though we are infected with vegetarianism.

Also, will be sure to try the new wine bar. I'm sure it will not disappoint.

Thanks, Chef Colby and Co.

Time past and time future

What might have been and what has been

Point to one end, which is always present.

- T.S. Eliot

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Course 2:

Chestnut Soup, Creme de Truffle, Ginger, Apple Vinegar Emulsion

Best dish of the night.  Best soup of my life.  Won't say much more.  Soup was smooth and delicious.  Everything was perfect.

Course 3:

Roast Heirloom Beets, Crosnes and Turnips, Root Spinach, Polenta, Pomegranate

This was my companions' favorite.  The beets were roasted beautifully, and the crosnes (not sure how to describe) were exotic and quite good.  Polenta was better than any I have made (perfect texture) and who knew polenta's perfect mate was pomegranate?

i hate chestnuts, yet surprisingly, i've found that two of my favorite courses during my recent five-month culinary tour of europe were chestnut soups. was bluestem's version more sweet or savoury?

re: crosnes - you can read more about them here.

thanks for the review foodexile!

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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  • 5 weeks later...

Just saw the new lounge which hasnt quite been finished but looks great and Im very excited about it opening in the future for Blue Stem. Kansas City is going to be lucky to have a concept like this to be apart of the city's already best restaurant.

"cuisine is the greatest form of art to touch a human's instinct" - chairman kaga

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  • 3 weeks later...

*Fresh pineapple juice, strawberry, champagne foam

Tasty palate cleanser and awakener for this seasonal menu

*Duo of tunas with yogurt, orange zest ‘dust’, gelee with ginger, orange section

Two varieties of raw tuna folded together…what’s not to like? I was worried about the orange (not my favorite flavor) but it all worked together.

*Two cauliflowers:

Hot – roasted, then browned with lemon yogurt to form a light crust, served with Berkshire bacon;

Cold – an incredible, unctuous cauliflower panna cotta

Served with sprouts, dijon mustard, smoked steelhead roe

This was very impressive. Honest. It could change the way you feel about humble cauliflower. And roe. And bacon. Off-the-chart umami.

*Malaspina oysters two ways, with red wine gelee

Bernaise (shallots, vinaigre, egg/lemo cream – I think)

Deconstructed mignonette (which is my favorite oyster accompaniment)

I love raw oysters so I was an easy mark for this course. Red wine gelee. Mmmm.

*Rock shrimp, orrichieti, cippolini, black trumpets

Tasty comfort food; I’ve never thought of rock shrimp as being this flavorful but they were up to the task of anchoring this dish.

*Hot and sour soup – calamari, pickled shitake, cilantro

I want this delivered to me the next time I have a cold. It was hot, it was sour (often hot and sour soup is neither). The cilantro makes it sing, the pickled shitake and calamari make it more interesting than the run-of-the-mill treatment of this classic.

*Roasted turbot, parsley oil; calamari en su tinto

This was the only course I wasn’t wild about. Probably nothing wrong with it if you're a turbot fan. The calamari was inky and tasty though.

*Tasmanian salmon, cippolini, brussel sprouts, parsley puree, piquillo oil

Back on track in a big way; actually caught myself wondering if I could just have two more servings of this and call it a night;-)

*Hawaiian Snapper, potatos, julienne ginger, chorizo

Ah, but then this arrived and I was glad I hadn’t entered into a Faustian bargain with the kitchen for more salmon. This combination of flavors really elevated the snapper.

___________________________________________________________________

(I should note that by this time the staff was taking turns coming to the table to monitor my vital signs, rub my shoulders (like a boxer in the corner between rounds) and try to encourage me across the finish line. I was admonished to “save room for dessert” and the mere mention of it nearly pushed me over the edge. I tried to plea-bargain it down to a glass of champagne.)

___________________________________________________________________

*Wagyu, forest mushroom, smoked sea salt, calamata olive caramel

This is the stuff that caused my downfall back into omnivorism; if true Kobe is better than this I’m not sure I could handle it. The mere sight of it perked me up and gave me the strength to carry-on. The weather was too cold here last weekend to smoke anything but if it climbs into double-digits this weekend I will never again be without smoked sea salt. The olive caramel was unreal. I think a bite-sized piece of rare wagyu on a stick, dipped in olive caramel and sprinkled with smoked sea salt would make a killer confection (like a See’s sucker only w-a-y better). Maybe on the wine bar menu???

*Champagne Float, apple fritters with pear and carmel

I had to admit this was worth the final bit of pain. I was smiling as my forehead hit the table. Champagne floats will be replacing mimosas and bellinis at future brunches at Chateau moosnsqrl.

Kudos to the entire crew as they approach their 2-year anniversary. They're not getting older, they're getting better.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Thanks Judy for that excellent and detailed report!! I knew I could count on you!

*Champagne Float, apple fritters with pear and carmel

I had to admit this was worth the final bit of pain.  I was smiling as my forehead hit the table.  Champagne floats will be replacing mimosas and bellinis at future brunches at Chateau moosnsqrl.

... I've had the Champagne float too - and it was a fantastic end. Although it didn't procure pain in my case, I would appreciate, Megan and Colby, if the next time I come in you could just knock me out at the end of the meal by hooking me up to an IV of this wonderful treat and provide wheelchair service to the car!! :laugh:

Kudos to the entire crew as they approach their 2-year anniversary.  They're not getting older, they're getting better.

Looking forward to a long overdue re-visit!

ulterior epicure.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I've also had the champagne float. I think it was at the Food and Wine celebration dinner. Wasn't expecting it to be so enjoyable, but I remember wanting to try and recreate it at home.

Just firmed up plans with a Bluestem newbie for some weeknight in mid to late April. I don't know how I'm going to tear myself away from these HMR entrees and shakes though. Colby is going to have one tough act to follow, that's all I've got to say......this pre-packaged vegetable stew with genuine beef chunks I've got for lunch is a world-beater.

Plus, I don't throw in the towel as easily as Judy.....geeeeeezzzz....... :raz:

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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I don't know how I'm going to tear myself away from these HMR entrees and shakes though.

... sorry, lost in traslation... "hmr entrees?" :blink:

ditto, judy, if you had trouble keeping up at a 12-course, how are you expecting to keep pace at a place like alinea where 12-courses is barely the half-way marker? :laugh: the last time i was there, our meal took 5 hours! i realistically could have run a marathon in that time!! :wacko:

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I don't know how I'm going to tear myself away from these HMR entrees and shakes though.

... sorry, lost in traslation... "hmr entrees?" :blink:

ditto, judy, if you had trouble keeping up at a 12-course, how are you expecting to keep pace at a place like alinea where 12-courses is barely the half-way marker? :laugh: the last time i was there, our meal took 5 hours! i realistically could have run a marathon in that time!! :wacko:

u.e.

I don't expect to keep up at Alinea. I told Colby at some point during my meal that "I haven't been this full since Achatz was at Trio." I doubt I will ever go to Alinea because I can't imagine enjoying it in its current format. However good it is, I just don't think I'm up for it. Maybe if they add a kids' menu. :wink:

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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It sounds amazing.

Tell me more about the champagne float. What, exactly, was in it?

And the olive caramel. Haven't ever had that.

I have thought about telling my husband that my grandmother died, so that I could drive up there and enjoy this. Unfortunately, he is well aware that I have no living grandmothers. But maybe I had an aunt in Kansas City, right? She was such a sweet woman. . . and I really can't miss her funeral. . .

Gonna have to think up a name for her. Soon. :biggrin:

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I have thought about telling my husband that my grandmother died, so that I could drive up there and enjoy this.  Unfortunately, he is well aware that I have no living grandmothers.  But maybe I had an aunt in Kansas City, right?  She was such a sweet woman. . . and I really can't miss her funeral. . .

Gonna have to think up a name for her.  Soon. :biggrin:

tsk, tsk, tsk... for shame!! :hmmm:

... but a lie worth constructing!! :laugh:

dinerminer - thanks for decoding the "industry" lingo! closest thing i'm familiar with are m.r.e.'s (meals ready to eat) - which can be remarkably good!

cheers.

u.e.

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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  • 2 months later...

Alrighty, a quick report on a wonderful night at Bluestem enjoying the Impulsive Collection.....

I went with Moosnsqrl and Chileheadmike last night, and we enjoyed a full four hours of top tier dining and absolutely riveting conversations about the merits of something being so good "I'd eat that off a car bumper" and "I don't know where you get your snails, but where I get mine they don't come seasoned". Dave Crum even came in on his night off for fear of leaving Colby alone to defend himself. Seriously, it was a fantastic meal. I'll include some comments, and leave the rest to Judy and Mike. The impulsive collection is absolutely the way to go, and do give a few days notice if at all possible and you may get to play "guinea pig" for some new preparations and combinations of flavor. Jeremy's wine service was stellar, it can't be easy to hit the mark with all ten wines but he managed to do it. I hadn't been to Bluestem since last year, so this was my first visit to the lounge. The expansion has been an improvement in every way...you enter through the lounge so the dining room doesn't get crowded, and it provides for a much more relaxed experience. Anyway, here's the menu to the best of my recollection. Feel free to correct me here if I get something wrong.....

* Amuse- shot glass w/cucumber, lime, melon ball, white wine foam, tarragon

* Crudo of scallop, watermelon, radish, yuzu gelee?

Wine- Greco di Tuffo Terredora, Campania, Italy

* Oyster (charged w/carbon dioxide), avocado, soy, lotus root, cucumber

Wine- Muscadet Serer et Maine, Loire Valley, France

This was an oustanding combination of flavors, I hope to see it worked into the regular menu. Lotus root and avocado as the ultimate "chips and dip" with the charged oyster in the middle.

* Burgundy Escargot

Wine- Trimbach Pinot Blanc

According to someone at the table, Bluestem NEVER does a classic presentation of escargot.........heh heh. That is until last night. Good stuff, with the shell holding onto the ultimate butter "shooter".

* Foie gras torchon, peanut butter, strawberries w/chopped mint and rhubarb gelee

Wine- Inniskillen Ice Wine

I'm totally biased, but I think the torchon at Bluestem is one of the best foie preparations ever (Chicago folks, feel free to come down and check it out.... :wink: ). The accompaniments last night, reminiscent of PB&J, were the perfect addition.

* Pea soup, sherry sabayon, pink peppercorns, pea shoots

Wine- Gruner Veltliner

The amount of flavor the chefs get from fresh peas and a little broth is a mystery.........oustanding.

* Tasmanian trout, saffron broth, brandade, spring garlic

Wine- Solitude Chardonnay, Carneros, California

You just don't see brandade on enough menus these days.

* Hamachi, laurel, green tea emulsion, chorizo

Wine- Carmela Benegas Rose, Mendoza, Argentina

Up to this point in the menu this was probably my favorite dish. Put a good sear on a piece of fish and you've got me. The mild chorizo (and tiny diced potato?) made this a surprisingly rich dish.

* Wagyu flatiron, morroccan olive, almond crusted asparagus

Wine- Aglianico Rubrato San Gregorio (sp???) Campania, Italy

Not a lot to say about this one.....it speaks for itself. I don't think anyone said anything the whole time we were eating it, which is saying alot because apparently Mike and Judy know every hippie who has ever lived in Lawrence....and all of their family members.....and pets.... :raz:

* Elysian Fields lamb, fava bean puree, veal jus, morel

Wine- Gago Tempranillo, Spain

* Colorado goat cheese, mostardo, nut bread

Wine- Sherry

Great cheese, but the thing that stuck out in this course was the mostardo (sp?). Little slivers of pear and apple that have been candied in sugar, horseradish and mustard oil. I believe Colby said it is from Italy, and other than cheese I'm not sure what it could be used with, but it beats the heck out of the usual quince or citrus paste you get with most cheese courses.

* Spring Mint ice cream sandwich, something with basil, berry ‘drops’ (served cruelly atop a mirror!)

Wine- Moscato di Asti, Piedmont, Italy

The humble ice cream sandwich may literally be my favorite dessert, even the cheapo kind you got back in the school cafeteria. The homemade fresh spring mint ice cream in this one was so great. I'd go hang out in the lounge after work just to have the foie gras and this dessert.

* Champagne float, chocolate truffle

It was around this time that Colby joined us for a bit and we started chatting about how sous vide could take the BBQ world by storm. I'd had a lot of wine and food at this point, and I'm not sure I followed it completely, but whatever is gonna get me new toys in the kitchen sounds good.

Anyway, thanks once again to the staff at Bluestem. That was a fantastic, relaxing meal.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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I believe it's $100 for the 12 courses, and another $35 (big bargain IMHO) for the wine pairings. There's another seven course chef's tasting menu available every night, the impulsive collection is only available Mon-Thu. The collection menu on a weeknight is the way to go as far as I'm concerned...it's just more relaxed than a weekend evening and you get to try new dishes that may or may not be seen again. Not sure when I'll see morels again like the ones we had last night.....

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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