Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
cru

Eating my way through Paris

Recommended Posts

I'm taking a young very talented chef to Paris next month and want him to experience the best of Parisian dining. Classic and Modern. I'm already going to Chateaubriand, Astier, Bistro Paul Bert, D' Chez Eux, and Chez Michel. We're also hitting several breezy little wine bars like La Verre Voule and Cremerie Caves Miard.Let me know if you feel strongly against any of my choices or strongly about 1 I may have left out. thank you in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm taking a young very talented chef to Paris next month and want him to experience the best of Parisian dining.  Classic and Modern.  I'm already going to Chateaubriand, Astier, Bistro Paul Bert, D' Chez Eux, and Chez Michel.  We're also hitting several breezy little wine bars like La Verre Voule and Cremerie Caves Miard.Let me know if you feel strongly against any of my choices or strongly about 1 I may have left out.  thank you in advance.

Hi Cru,

I’m not so sure I would choose Astier, not that there is anything wrong with it, but if you are only here for a short time I think you could do better. I love Chez Michel, le Verre Volé and la Cremerie. Chateaubriand will be interesting since it’s about to changes hands. How about L’os à Moelle instead of Astier or even Le Troquet. Other places that come to mind are L’Ami Jean, Avant Gout, La Regalade, Thierry Burlot. Since you seem to like natural wines you might want to try Le Baratin.

For something different you might try Les Magnolias, just outside Paris, which gets rave reviews and has been talked about here. Also, Chez Jean in the 9th for French cooking with a more modern touch.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

felice

thanks for the great response. i agree about Astier, I wanted to show him something "typical". Do you know of a better place that would be very traditional? Would love to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm taking a young very talented chef to Paris next month and want him to experience the best of Parisian dining.  Classic and Modern. 

The best of classical French cooking to be found in Paris is at L'Ambroisie. The cost is going to be very high, and it's probably the toughest reservation in Paris, but the educational experience will be priceless.

Send words to Chef in the kitchen that you are bringing a young and impressionable cook to experience the best of the classical French 3*. I am sure they will be extremely kind to you. Bernard Pacaud is known to be a generous teacher to young cooks passing through his kitchen and his dining room.

Notice I said 'cook', not 'chef'. You might not get the same response if you told them you are brining a talented 'chef' to sample their cuisine. It's Paris, after all.

On the modern side, the master is Pierre Gagnaire. He will also be extremely nice to your young friend.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be loathe to use the word "chef" as freely in Paris as it's used in NY. "Cuisinier" is a well respected term in France. Although "cook" might be the direct translation, someone who refers to himself as "cuisinier" in France is likely to be called "chef" here.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to Felice's suggestions, three places that are often overlooked that I thought were exceptional are Les Ormes, Le Pamphlet, and Le Clos Des Gourmets. I would think a young chef would also like Aux Lyonnais very much. The place I can't wait to try is Drouant (see John Talbott's recent review).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just my two cents but not sure that Bistrot Paul Bert is really really worth the trip. It's a very cute and inexpensive bistro in the 11th and yes, for the price it's good bistrot food, but I think there might be better choices if that's what you want. I liked Pim's list on her site for inexpensive bistrots - http://chezpim.typepad.com/blogs/2004/12/p..._pas_cher_.html. I'm not shooting down the Paul Bert, it is very "typique" but just wondering if there are others that might be better. Perhaps the group can elaborate on this.

But...on the same street is Temps au Temps that is really one of my fav restaurants in Paris right now. A young and very sweet couple opened it and it's a great experience. The food is gastro but not too too expensive and a very nice atmosphere. I'd vote to try there.

I'd also second the vote for L'Ambroisie. It's such a special experience.

What about Atelier Robuchon for lunch one day? That's a super fun thing to see for a chef. Plus the degustation is a great way to sample some very interesting dishes.

Zoe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
felice

thanks for the great response.  i agree about Astier, I wanted to show him something "typical".  Do you know of a better place that would be very traditional?  Would love to know.

What about La Regalade, Le Troquet or L'Ami Jean? Any of those would fit the bill I would think. For something traditional you might also want to try le Comptoir at lunch.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm taking a young very talented chef to Paris next month and want him to experience the best of Parisian dining.  Classic and Modern.  I'm already going to Chateaubriand, Astier, Bistro Paul Bert, D' Chez Eux, and Chez Michel.  We're also hitting several breezy little wine bars like La Verre Voule and Cremerie Caves Miard.Let me know if you feel strongly against any of my choices or strongly about 1 I may have left out.  thank you in advance.

No one's mentioned Cerisaie, Ze Kitchen Galerie + Au Bon Accueil. And I too like Chez Michel, Magnolias, Temps au Temps, Thierry Burlot, Caves Miard. I'd do exactly what you're aiming for; a mixture of new/old, classic/modern, etc. Might as well show the breadth and depth.

Happy eating; please report.


Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just my two cents but not sure that Bistrot Paul Bert is really really worth the trip. It's a very cute and inexpensive bistro in the 11th and yes, for the price it's good bistrot food, but I think there might be better choices if that's what you want. I liked Pim's list on her site for inexpensive bistrots - http://chezpim.typepad.com/blogs/2004/12/p..._pas_cher_.html. I'm not shooting down the Paul Bert, it is very "typique" but just wondering if there are others that might be better. Perhaps the group can elaborate on this.

But...on the same street is Temps au Temps that is really one of my fav restaurants in Paris right now. A young and very sweet couple opened it and it's a great experience. The food is gastro but not too too expensive and a very nice atmosphere. I'd vote to try there.

Thanks for the endorsement, Zoe. That list is a little out of date and the new one, compiling my experiences from last year, will be up soon.

I actually like Bistro Paul Bert, a lot. Le Temps au Temps is also quite cute, but I might give the edge to Paul Bert for more choices, on both the food and wine departments.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree with Pim that Bistro Paul Bert is really good, and well-worth the trip (it's not really that far from anywhere...) I've had desserts there that were truly outstanding...as good, if not better, than those in fancier establishments. The staff is really nice and the food is always great.

(They have an oyster bar/seafood restaurant next door that looks good, but someone told me it wasn't so great.)

L'Os à Moelle is very good too, but since they do 2 different seatings, (American-style, as they call it...) it's hard to relax with the harried servers rushing around, trying to feed everyone as quickly as possible...you really feel like you have to 'eat-it-and-beat-it'.

It's also rather brightly lit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just my two cents but not sure that Bistrot Paul Bert is really really worth the trip. It's a very cute and inexpensive bistro in the 11th and yes, for the price it's good bistrot food, but I think there might be better choices if that's what you want. I liked Pim's list on her site for inexpensive bistrots - http://chezpim.typepad.com/blogs/2004/12/p..._pas_cher_.html. I'm not shooting down the Paul Bert, it is very "typique" but just wondering if there are others that might be better. Perhaps the group can elaborate on this.

I disagree with you and I very warmly recommend Le Bistrot Paul-Bert. It's one of my favorite bistrots in Paris. It's nearly perfect, sticking to what used to make Paris bistrots great (and that you don't much see anymore). Few bistrots in Paris are as decent, interesting, friendly and reasonable as this one. Unpretentious so perhaps a bit overlooked, not much buzz about it, but again this is Paris, not New York :biggrin:

The food is also quite good at La Muse Vin.

Cru, I also recommend Le Pré Verre for modern bistrot food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I disagree with you and I very warmly recommend Le Bistrot Paul-Bert. It's one of my favorite bistrots in Paris. It's nearly perfect, sticking to what used to make Paris bistrots great (and that you don't much see anymore). Few bistrots in Paris are as decent, interesting, friendly and reasonable as this one. Unpretentious so perhaps a bit overlooked, not much buzz about it, but again this is Paris, not New York  :biggrin:

I find the reactions to Le Bistrot Paul-Bert, especially coming from people I respect so much, fascinating. But I have to come down on the side of the group disappointed in it. I've only been there once but I found it uninspired/routine/indeed banal. Now, to balance that, I loved l'Ecallier du Bistrot, their oyster-seafood annex, where I've been three times and that I assume either shares the cooking or the cooking philosophy. Their Utah beach oysters are superb and the fish not bad at all.

So what is Cru to do? Either pick which side's proponents put forth a better case or better still - go and be the tie-breaker. But do tell us how you liked it.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised too by the appeal of Bistro Paul Bert. I've been going there for years because I live around the corner and it's good value for money. But it's pretty basi, the menu rarely changes, and doesn't stray from the classics. Nothing wrong with it, but in my opinion there are plenty of bistros in the same price range that are far better.

If you're looking for a decent steak-frites, it's a good choice.


Mimi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...