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Congee

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I'd have to say that the answer to that is, no.  It's savory oatmeal.

Jook has to be made from rice.

Oh Oh! GIRD YOUR LOINS, ERGO SUM YOUR COGITAS', DRAW YOUR LINE IN THE SAND. The storms of another semantic war is gathering.

Does porridge have to be made only with oatmeal? Do we not call jook rice porridge? When my mother fed me savoury oatmeal porridge did she not call it mak pei jook? :unsure::rolleyes:

Well for us mak pei is mak pei and jook is jook. :smile:

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My mom has never referred to oatmeal as mak pei jook. To me that means oatmeal WITH jook. ICKY!

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To add fuel to the fire, or more confusions to the confusions...

Mandarin speakers up north (which is like the majority of China's population) know nothing of "jook" - which seems to be only a Cantonese nomenclature. Though they don't really have "jook" as Cantonese know it. They have xi fan - literal translation of "diluted rice".


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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all this confusion!!! I'm making korean jook ....I guess it's korean cause I'm using korean rice. ANyways, I'm cooking it in a rice cooker and then I'm going to cook it over the stove after its done and add some chicken and green onion to it. Oh and I'm using white rice and about a tsp of black rice to make my jook purple

oh and phage, hobak juk is the way to go! My mother used to buy packets of it from the tea section of the grocery store and it would taste good even then. It was more of a gruel, but it tasted like candy...so good!


Edited by SheenaGreena (log)

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

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To add fuel to the fire,

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that you can fry up strips of Pilsbury canned bread dough if you don't have any yao zha guai. :laugh:

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AI YA! :laugh::blink: You're supposed to make Chinese donuts with that! Fried Chinese donuts beat out many inspid Western donuts. Unless it's a Krispy Kreme fresh off the line.

I saw somewhere on a random food blog that the author used the Pilsbury biscuits as the dough for pan fried dumplings. Needless to say, the author was *not* Asian.

Jook rules. Hell, I might make some today since it's so cold out! I think my fu yee should be much better this week. :laugh:

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To add fuel to the fire,

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that you can fry up strips of Pilsbury canned bread dough if you don't have any yao zha guai. :laugh:

:hmmm: "guai" means devil. How can you call the Pilsbury Doughboy "devil"? :shock:

SheenaGreena:

oh and phage, hobak juk is the way to go! My mother used to buy packets of it from the tea section of the grocery store and it would taste good even then. It was more of a gruel, but it tasted like candy...so good!

The term "gruel" is not allowed at this time. :wink:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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To add fuel to the fire, or more confusions to the confusions...

Mandarin speakers up north (which is like the majority of China's population) know nothing of "jook" - which seems to be only a Cantonese nomenclature.  Though they don't really have "jook" as Cantonese know it.  They have xi fan - literal translation of "diluted rice".

I'm sure how universal that is, Mandarin speakers I've spoken to in California pronounce jook as joe and they know what it is. But you're right, xi fan is also used.


Edited by Seitch (log)

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So how would you pronouce xifan? I have no idea!

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It was explained to me that xi fan is gruel, ie the grains of rice remain mostly intact and if you let it sit, all the rice will sink to the bottom and there will be a layer of liquid on top.

Zhou/Jook is porridge, and it's thicker and compared to xi fan, it's sort of pasty.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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So how would you pronouce xifan?  I have no idea!

Xifan is Mandarin. Xi (Cantonese "Hey" - diluted), Fan (Cantonese "Fan" - rice)


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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So how would you pronouce xifan?  I have no idea!

Xi = hsi , fan = fan

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If you grind rice in a a coffee/spice grinder you can make goodish jook in ten minutes.

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Oh, in case I caused any confusion about all of this.....

Cream of rice, is granulated rice. Basically like "broken rice" but in much smaller pieces. It's not precooked or anything, just plain and simple, ground up rice (like a coarse rice flour) Brown rice farina is the same thing, except with brown rice (and organic)

So cream of rice probably isn't that far off from using broken rice to make congee...right? Right?....why are you looking at me like that?

Now, if that's the case...I wonder if you could make congee from white rice flour...*begins running*

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

If I had to pick one? Fried crullers cut into strips. They did that at the Deluxe Food Market in NYC and I fell in love with the combination ever since.

A combo? Well, probably peanuts, scallions, sesame oil, soy sauce, doufu ru, and of course, crullers. Perhaps that's a bit too many items for what is supposedly a simple dish... :rolleyes:

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

Cruellers cut into rings so they can get globs of jook inside; diced pei dan; slivers of preserved chili radish; and cilantro!

Kids must have pork silk, cruellers. Grandson likes siu mai in his. :wink: Smart boy - meat eater!


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

Cruellers cut into rings so they can get globs of jook inside; diced pei dan; slivers of preserved chili radish; and cilantro!

Yep, yep, yep, and yep. I also like slivered ginger. Growing up we would also place raw fish slices at the bottom of the bowl to be cooked by the boiling jook poured on top.

Grandson likes siu mai in his. :wink: Smart boy - meat eater!

Never heard that one before!


Edited by sheetz (log)

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

Cruellers cut into rings so they can get globs of jook inside; diced pei dan; slivers of preserved chili radish; and cilantro!

Yep, yep, yep, and yep. I also like slivered ginger. Growing up we would also place raw fish slices at the bottom of the bowl to be cooked by the boiling jook poured on top.

That's Yee Sang Jook. My dad's favorite, but I've yet to get past my fear of raw fish, though I know it's not really raw already.

I like pounded, then deepfried dried shrimp, with plenty of sliced young ginger, onion oil and a little soy sauce.

Ikan bilis is good too, with pepper and soy sauce.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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So------ however you make it or call it , what is THE most favorite topping. The one you just HAVE to have.

Thousand year old eggs plus salted pork with lots of scallions and white pepper on top. Give me a crispy cruller on the side. Well done and freshly fried, please!

Sometimes I'm lucky enough to get duck jook at home. My parents will make bak jook and put leftover roast duck on top. Me, I just take the skin and put it on top. :wub:

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Ooh...duck jook is my favorite (is anyone surprised?). My mom used to get duck heads and make them into jook. :wub: I usually just make jook from whatever bones are in the freezer.

My favorite toppings are chopped scallions and choong choy. Crullers of course. I could just eat those plain.


Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Toppings?? Any and all of the above. My favourite is thin slices of raw tender beef, scallions, white pepper, soy sauce, ginger OR substitute raw fish for the beef. :wub:

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I'm in the raw fish drizzled with soya and sesame and slivered ginger catagory. But I only order that out...don't know why. At home it's probably pei dan and pork mostly because those two ingredients are always around. The ikan bilis sound good, but ours never last past nasi lemak.

regards,

trillium

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Ooh...duck jook is my favorite (is anyone surprised?).  My mom used to get duck heads and make them into jook.  :wub: I usually just make jook from whatever bones are in the freezer.

Be careful! I am seeing a Hannibal Lecter in the becoming in the ducks' world! :laugh:


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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