Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Gosling's 'regular' v. Gosling's 151 proof


KOK
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have been a big fan of Gosling's Black Seal rum since 1996, but have never had the Gosling's 151 proof. A friend brought back what I thought would be a bottle of regular Gosling's from Bermuda, but it turned out to be the 151 proof.

Does the 151 proof taste and smell, etc like the regular proof, and can I just use less in drinks like a Dark & Stormy, rum and cola or rum and juice? Or is it only only used as a 'floater' on top of drinks, or other non-traditionmal purposes?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Kevin

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

Link to comment
Share on other sites

151 is a completely different rum and using a little less won't even begin to approximate the taste or character of the lower alcohol blend. When distillers dilute their rums, it takes several days to reduce the alcohol content since the water must have time to blend with the high proof rum.

Floaters are the best use I can think of for these over proof spirits.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Ed. I was hoping that wouldn't be your answer but thought it probably would be. It doesn't even sound like it would usefull in cooking due to the flavor difference.

I guess I'll just have to go to Bermuda (instead of the local liquor store) myself to get a bottle of the original : )

Thanks again!

K

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Ed.  I was hoping that wouldn't be your answer but thought it probably would be.  It doesn't even sound like it would usefull in cooking due to the flavor difference.

I guess I'll just have to go to Bermuda (instead of the local liquor store) myself to get a bottle of the original : )

Thanks again!

K

I have been an addict to Goslings sicne the '80's and really missed it in the UK - I contacted them through their website Goslingsand they sent me the name of heir distributor and now I can get it here - try them.

I did not have a problem getting it in New York, but it was more expensive, obviously...

AND I once got a bottle of the 151, that was in 1990, I was never able to drink it, it was way too strong and the taste was different - it finally broke on one of the moves...

www.nutropical.com

~Borojo~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Floaters are the best use I can think of for these over proof spirits.

Ed, I am not familiar with the term "floater" in the context of overproof rum. What does it refer to?

Went to school in Halifax with a terrific fellow from Bermuda who introduced me to Gosslings Black Seal rum and ginger beer.

Of course being in the Martitimes meant that overproof rum was generally readily available having been acquired from Ste. Pierre & Miquelon. London Dock was the prefered "jet fuel" of that time...ie, the late '70's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you still want to give it a shot, water it down to the appropriate proof and let it rest a few months before giving it a try. Might need a bit more carmel or other additives to get that strong "goslings taste" but you'll be left with a passable and drinkable rum at least. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you'd like to water down some rum, I'd suggest adding only a few percent water at time for a few days as opposed to just adding water and waiting. This is one of the difference I encounter when I taste rum bottled and properly diluted at a distillery and rum which has been contract bottled by a foreign bottler whose whole motive is production as in add the water and bottle it.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or just mix it straight into your drink and enjoy it for what it is. Overproof rums certainly make for a much different balance, and a drink that hits you a little harder, but I personally find drinks made with them to be very enjoyable, even without dilution.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Nullo, don't dilute it, just use overproof rums sparingly or with caution. I mixed Jack Iron from Carriacou, 160 proof with fresh grapefruit juice and since the rum was aged a couple of years, it was way to smooth and the strong juice covered the alcohol, until I tried to stand up.

Floaters are commonly a small amount of dark rum added to cocktails to give them color and more flavor.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The Gosling's 151 was far more different than I thought it would be. A much stronger taste and aroma than the 80 proof, though they both looked the same. I sometimes drink the regular with an ice cube or two, but could not drink the 151 without a mixer.

I made a 151 and Coke and it was actualy fairly similar to one made with the regular, but I did have to use much more Coke than I would have with regular Gosling's.

Thanks for all the help,

Kevin

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...