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JustKay

eG Foodblog : kew/Tepee

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Hi!

I guess I should begin by introducing myself. Call me kew ('kyü), short for Qistina.

I live in Malaysia's model intelligent township about 50km from the capital city Kuala Lumpur, and adjacent to the new administrative capital city Putrajaya.

I am a SAHM, with 4 kids ages 4 to 12. I quit working about 8 years ago to concentrate on being a full-time Mommy. 6 years ago, I began baking goodies at home for sale, mostly to friends, family, and acquaintances.

Back in the 80's I had the opportunity to live in Canada, where I studied Computer Math at one of the universities in Ontario. I loved it there, and still miss it very much. Given a choice I would have stayed there and work, but I had to come back. :wacko:

After about 2 years of being back and working in the field of my training, I realized that I didn't want to be holed up with machines and data all day long and eventually found myself in Personnel/Human Resources. I enjoyed what I did very much. I was first assigned to the Recuitment Section, then on to Compensations and Benefit and later to Employee Relations where I was also in charge of the cafeteria. We had about 4000 employees working round the clock on 8 hour shifts then. The cafeteria services was leased out to Gardner Merchant of the UK and I thoroughly enjoyed working with them. During that time, our cafeteria was known to be the cleanest and the best within Penang. :laugh:

I really loved my job, but when I was pregant with my third child, I decided that being a Mommy is more important to me. So, when my oldest child entered kindergarten, I quit my job. It was then that I had time to dabble with my other passion which is baking. My Grandma was a baker and my Mom, although she didn’t really pursue that as a career, loved baking and always did so for friends. Apart from the baking, I also now have a small home-based web services business.

I should warn you that we don't eat any designer or elegant food at home everyday. And I hardly plan out in great detail as to what we'd eat. Gone are those days. Now, I much prefer to take it easy, so to speak, and work things out according to the changing demands. Some days I cook, other days I just want to be lazy. Weekends are rest days, we eat out. :biggrin:

Breakfast is usually a hurried affair of bread or cereal and juice or milk for the kids before they leave for school. DH, he just wants a cup of coffee. And as for me, I eat whatever I want.

Today, I had a Butterfinger Wafer for breakfast followed by some ice-cream. :raz: Butterfinger Wafers are not available here - we received a box of goodies from a friend in the US - hence the excitement :rolleyes: And I needed to be real quick about it. I had a cake to deliver this morning, some 40km away and then come back in time to pick up my little girl from kindy.

I seldom eat lunch because the kids have lunch at school and DH works too far away to come home for lunch.

So, mostly I will talk about what we have for dinner. But I will try to eat a proper lunch the next 3 days. :wink:

And you've been warned, it will be nothing like those you've seen before .... where you see them prepare/eat elaborate and elegant food.

Everyday meals are a simple affair. And as I am currently over my head with things (but I've been asked to blog for several times that I feel guilty of saying no :raz: ) , I don't foresee preparing any time-consuming dishes.

I will blog for the first 4 days and then TeePee will take over the next 3 days. Perhaps, we can see the similarities or differences between what a typical Malay family (mine) eat for everyday and what a Chinese family (TeePee's) normally eat.

Feel free though to ask questions and I will try my best to answer them.

I will talk about today's dinner in a bit. It's only 5:30pm here now and we don't eat dinner till about 7:30pm or so.


Edited by kew (log)

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Woohoo! Kew and Teepee are bloggin at long last! Take banyak gambar ya (lotsa pictures).

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Malaysia rules!! Hello kew & Tepee, my ASEAN neighbors, I am so happy to see your team blog from my neck of the woods. :rolleyes:

Hope you will enjoy blogging, because it will certainly be a pleasure spending this week with you two!

So, it's almost time for dinner, what's for makan malam?

Selamat,

Yetty


Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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LOL guys! :biggrin:

We had dinner about an hour ago and I've just finished washing the dishes. :wacko:

I have to be quick about this 'coz I have a cake to bake for tomorrow.

I made 'yellow noodles' soup for dinner. An easy and quick complete meal. I took pictures but they don't come out too welll. I've just got this digicam last Sunday as our previous one broke, so I'm still trying to figure things out. I'll learn me how to use this yet! Hopefully within the next day or two.

The smaller kids do not like vegetables and seafood in their soup so I took the veggies and seafood out for them and leave the chicken meat and eggs in. The way I do this is that since veggies and seafood are added last, I have a strainer thing that I put veggies in and let it simmer for a while. After that, I take the strainer out and take a portion of the soup out for the kids. Then I added back the veggies & seafood to the soup. :rolleyes: I then added some cornstarch to the soup to thicken it .. DH likes it that way.

For dessert, I didn't make anything special. Just fruits ... mangos and honeydew. And the kids had more of the American candies to satisfy their sweet tooth. Tonite it was Reese's PBC.

gallery_17803_917_11881.jpg

gallery_17803_917_13933.jpg

And the cake I delivered this morning - Toblerone Cheesecake.

gallery_17803_917_11078.jpg


Edited by kew (log)

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Teehee, Kew, looks like we're alike in so many ways, this blog may well be done by one person. Anyway, more about that later.

About your pics, now's the time to be trigger-happy. Click, click and click away till you get the shot you like. Your dinner's great, by the way.

Touaregsand, if Kew doesn't make it to the open air markets, I'm sure I can oblige...uh, I mean DH, coz he's the one who does the marketing on Saturday.

Had to edit the spelling of Touaregsand; what a mouthful!


Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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A blog that starts with Toblerone Cheesecake :wub:, wow!

Thanks for taking the time to share, Kew. Will you divulge the recipe for the cheesecake?

Blog on!


Cognito ergo consume - Satchel Pooch, Get Fuzzy

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Go Kew! Go Teepee! Malaysia boleh! :biggrin:

The soup you made for dinner looks a lot to me like sup tulang (beef bone soup). Does it taste like it at all? Does it contain similar spices?

Do you bake a particular type of dessert more often than others? Do you make both Western cakes and Malaysian kuih?

Never having lived in KL before, I am surprised to see, when I visited last month, many KL residents eschew a good and proper Malaysian breakfast of nasi lemak or roti canai, (or in my case, both nasi lemak AND roti canai), in favor of a cup of coffee or a piece of toast or nothing at all. What is up with that?

A hot breakfast is so easily obtainable in Malaysia, available at almost every street corner, so one can't use convenience as an excuse. What I would give to exchange my breakfast of wheat bran for a hot, fluffy piece of roti canai every morning!

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Nice cake, Kew!

Your family, such picky eaters-lah! Why so much susah punya? (="Why so much trouble?", sort of.)

So what's with the honeydew? Back in the 70s, we smuggled some honeydew seeds into Kg. Merchang, hoping that they could make a lot of money growing honeydew during the glut of watermelons in season, but the plants all withered and died. I'm guessing the honeydew is imported? From Australia, perhaps? Good Malaysian watermelon not good enough for you picky eaters, is it? :laugh:


Michael aka "Pan

 

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The soup you made for dinner looks a lot to me like sup tulang (beef bone soup).  Does it taste like it at all?  Does it contain similar spices?

It's similar to sup tulang but very minimum usage of spices. I only added about an inch of cinnamon stick, a couple of cloves and a pod of cardamom. This is more flavorful though as it's a fusion of the various ingredients - that we don't want the spices overpowering - chicken meat, prawns, squids, eggs, carrots, celery, mustard greens, young corns. I would also normally add fish balls but I didn't have any yesterday.

Do you bake a particular type of dessert more often than others?  Do you make both Western cakes and Malaysian kuih?

Moist Chocolate Cake and Toblerone Cheesecake are the most popular. And trifles.

I mostly make western cakes & desserts.

Never having lived in KL before, I am surprised to see, when I visited last month, many KL residents eschew a good and proper Malaysian breakfast of nasi lemak or roti canai,  (or in my case, both nasi lemak AND roti canai), in favor of a cup of coffee or a piece of toast or nothing at all.  What is up with that?

Hmph ... it's all the hype about being super skinny is good I guess. But really, the mamak stalls and nasi lemak places are still very popular in KL.

Back in Johor, lontong would rival nasi lemak & roti canai. (I'll post a recipe for lontong so you guys know what it is :smile: )

Can you get the frozen roti canai/roti pratha where you are? The Kawan brand is not too bad. Definitely better than Kraft's. In a pinch, I'd eat this with Brahim's bottled sambal sauce.


Edited by kew (log)

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First question: what DO those Lotte Cream Chocolates you are fond of look like? I can't figure out which one you like! :laugh:

I guess I'll have to answer the first question on this blog eh?

I have tried googling for a picture or something so that I can show you but nada. Maybe they've stopped making them? The last time I had them was like some 8 years ago. :raz:

I :wub: Japanese chocolates and treats.

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Nice cake, Kew!

Thanks. I can bake yummy cakes but I am hopeless when it comes to decorating them. I have now resorted to using molded chocolates and chocolate cut-outs. I can copy all kinds of fonts pretty well though. :cool:

Your family, such picky eaters-lah! Why so much susah punya? (="Why so much trouble?", sort of.)

LOL! They are, aren't they? I'd rather not fight them and let them have their way and finish a meal.

So what's with the honeydew? Back in the 70s, we smuggled some honeydew seeds into Kg. Merchang, hoping that they could make a lot of money growing honeydew during the glut of watermelons in season, but the plants all withered and died. I'm guessing the honeydew is imported? From Australia, perhaps? Good Malaysian watermelon not good enough for you picky eaters, is it? :laugh:

My son tried a few times to grow the honeydew but everytime they grow big enough to start fruiting, they die. The seeds will germinate easily though. He's growing a papaya tree at the moment. It's about 4' high now. It's only 1 tree so I hope it's a hermaphrodite or he'll be rather disappointed. Good chance it will be one though as the seed was from the Papaya Eksotika.

I have no idea where the honeydew comes from :hmmm:

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The wonderfully perfumy Malaysian papaya totally rules! Anyone who visits Malaysia has to get some of the sliced fruit in plastic sold by vendors on the streets. Papaya, pineapple, jambu air ("water apple"), etc.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Hmmm...hermaphrodite papaya. What would that taste like? :hmmm::laugh:


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Hmmm...hermaphrodite papaya. What would that taste like? :hmmm:  :laugh:

The tree that is. :biggrin:

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Kew, do you grow any food plants in a garden? If so, tell us about that.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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This morning, I had had to meet a customer at a gas station and so I decided to try the Nasi Lemak and Kuih Lapis sold there.

gallery_17803_917_4511.jpg

gallery_17803_917_4674.jpg

Nasi Lemak is rice cooked with coconut milk instead of water, along with some ginger, shallots and ocassionally fenugreek seeds or cinnamon is added.

Kuih Lapis is a steamed dessert and made of rice flour, coconut milk, rose water, sugar, flour and some cornflour. It is then steamed layer by layer.

Lunch was fried Koay Teow (flat rice noodles).

gallery_17803_917_1378.jpg

And for dessert , I had ice-cream.

gallery_17803_917_6139.jpg

These reminds me of the days when I was little. Whenever Mom made these desserts, she would make extra so I could freeze them.

Now, Wall's make them as lollies. They are actually not too bad, considering that they are mass produced.

Kacang merah = red beans

Kacang hijau = green beans

Pulut Hitam = black glutinous rice

Each dessert is cooked similarly. Coconut milk, sugar, palm sugar and the beans/glutinous rice and some Pandan leaves for the aroma. It's not as thick as a pudding but more like soup.


Edited by kew (log)

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Kew, do you grow any food plants in a garden? If so, tell us about that.

Oh yes! Should I take pictures of them? There are mango, jackfruit, banana, calamansi and kedondong trees. And curry and pandan plants too, I think. :raz: I don't plant them - the gardeners do. :biggrin:

Btw, I *am* taking better pictures, am I? :unsure:

edited to add kedondong's botanical name, Burseraceae

The tree you see in the picture on the website is the of the 'original' specie. Many years ago they have successfully cultivated a better variety. The kedondong trees that are planted nowadays don't grow that big anymore. The fruits are more abundant with a softer skin, and the meat less 'stringy'. Kedondong makes good pickles.


Edited by kew (log)

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I'm sure we'd all like to look at pictures of the food plants in your garden.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Yes kew - pictures of the trees and fruits! We want pictures of everything - great time to test out the new camera :wink:!

How do you eat the kedondong? (The kedondong fruit is somewhat like a crunchy green mango with and odd-looking seed that has spiny fibres sticking out all over). I like it with a dip of dark soy sauce, sugar and cut red chillies.

(edited coz I type badly :sad:)


Edited by Shiewie (log)

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Yes kew - pictures of the trees and fruits! We want pictures of everything - great time to test out the new camera  :wink:!

:raz::biggrin:

How do you eat the kedondong? (The kedondong fruit is like somewhat like a crunchy green mango with and odd-looking seed that has spiny fibres sticking out all over). I like it with a dip of dark soy sauce, sugar and cut red chillies.

Dark soya sauce and sugar for me. Or with sambal rojak.

Unfortunately, we hardly ever get to pick the fruits. :rolleyes: Just yesterday I saw a few bunches of mangoes .... today they're gone. Grrr ....

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What do you think happened to the mangoes?


Michael aka "Pan

 

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I have no idea where the honeydew comes from  :hmmm:

I think they grow certain temperate fruits and vegetables in the Cameron Highlands, where the weather is cooler. I wonder if it could have come from there?

The pictures are great, kew! I liked the pictures when they were bigger too.

I love tropical fruits, and I couldn't get enough of it while in Malaysia. But my parents, who live there, prefer to eat imported fruits, like oranges, apples and grapes. My dad says tropical fruits like rambutans and papayas are so commonplace that he's sick of them.

Living in the states, I feel the same way about apples and oranges.

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This morning, I had had to meet a customer at a gas station and so I decided to try the Nasi Lemak and Kuih Lapis sold there.

How was the nasi lemak? What else came wrapped with the rice in the banana leaf?

Lunch was fried Koay Teow (flat rice noodles).

Did you cook the kway teow yourself or did you take out? What was in it?

And for dessert , I had ice-cream.

gallery_17803_917_6139.jpg

Ahh.... ais potong. Would gladly give my right arm for some ais potong right about now. I almost had to when I was in Carrefour at the Megamall back in February. I spotted a six-pack of aix potong in the freezer and had to have it right then and there. I took it to the cashier and paid for it, and walked back into the supermarket, ripping open the pack, and started biting off big chunks of the ice cream. Apparently, that sort of thing isn't done in KL, and the security guard wasn't too pleased. I think the guy must've been close to 60, and looked more like a greeter at Walmart, so I thought better of messing with him, and wisely left the store. :biggrin:

Kew, do you know why they're called ais potong (potong=cut)?

My favorite is the pulut hitam flavor. Is this a new flavor? Don't remember seeing it when I was a kid.


Edited by Laksa (log)

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