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Cancoillotte

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I came across a type of cheese I'd not previously encountered, either here in the U.S. or in France (where I've spent most of my time in either Normandy or Languedoc). It's called cancoillotte and is a bit like a fondue (except that it's already liquid at room temp), made with skim milk and butter. More about it here.

Having not seen it before myself, I was wondering how commonly it's used in France?


Can you pee in the ocean?

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Cancoillotte is on the menu at Chez Maitre Paul in Paris which is an outpost of Franc-Comtoise cuisine.


Edited by Laidback (log)

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Cancoillotte is on the menu at Chez Maitre Paul in Paris which is an outpost of Franche-Comté.

Not surprising, as it's a product local to that area.

But is it otherwise consumed elsewhere in France? Presumably a "poor man's" product given that it's made with skim milk. Finding it in Atlanta seems pretty strange, unless perhaps there's some sort of marketing to the U.S. based on it's being "leger" (though my market made no mention of this---I noticed on the ingredient list that it was made with skim milk and so chose it because I'm dieting at the moment).

A bit "La vache qui rit", in point of fact.


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www.fromages.com entry on cancoillotte. Cancoillotte is made from a skim milk cheese called Metton. Addly enough although there's a page on cancoillotte, which means it can be ordered from this commerical site, but there's no entry for metton. According to the site, cancoillotte is made by melting metton in a bit of milk or water over low heat and adding butter and salt. It's sold ready made as spread for bread. It also comes in garlic and wine flavors. The closing discription on the entry says it all -- "The taste is simple."

Robert Buxbaum

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Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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The term "metton" apparently refers to the fermented skim milk curd. You actually can buy it from Poitrey and then make the final cancoillotte at home.


Can you pee in the ocean?

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It's not really cheese. It's a commercially processed cheese product . Presuming that it's a "poorman's product" is not entirely off base. It's an ordinary product for ordinary tastes. Small children probably really like. I've never tasted it. In answer to your question, think of it as French Velveeta (of course better, because its French :laugh: )


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

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Cancoillotte is a regional product, but it is readily available at most supermarkets in the Paris region and in many other parts of France. So one may assume that is has become fairly common as a national (sort-of) cheese. It is available as plain or garlic cancoillotte.

It is not really used like cheese but as an accompaniment to warm foods like poached Morteau sausage (+ a salad), boiled vegetables, pot-au-feu, etc. It is more a condiment than a cheese.

I wouldn't compare it to Velveeta, Velveeta is more like Vache Qui Rit. Cancoillotte is quite unique, unlike anything else. The best analogy I could find would be the runny part of a ripe camembert, shiny and almost translucent, with a mild taste and a slightly rubbery texture. It is neither for "ordinary tastes" (if there is such a thing) nor for sophisticated tastes, it is only, and simply, quite delicious.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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Cheese product/condiment in a tub sometimes with added flavors. So it's French Cheese whiz. I couldn't resist. All in good fun. I'll refrain from further comments untill I actually try it.

You're correct The Laughing cow is more like Velveeta. I've heard of Velveeta being referred to as Arkansas Brie. Would Vache Qui Rit be Goussainville Velveeta?


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

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Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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It's not really cheese. It's a commercially processed cheese product .  Presuming that it's a "poorman's product" is not entirely off base. It's an ordinary product for ordinary tastes. Small children probably really like. I've never tasted it.  In answer to your question, think of it as French Velveeta (of course better, because its French  :laugh: )

Well then, high time you tried it. It's quite tasty, not at all Velveeta-ish and most definitely not Cheez Whiz. My "La vache qui rit" comment had to do with its very uniform, gooey texture.

The brand being marketed here in Atlanta (Poitrey's "Gourmande" series, made with 14% butter instead of the lower fat "La belle etoile" product) comes in a version made with kirsch as well as the more common options.

And while we're at it, La vache qui rit isn't very much like Velveeta either.


Can you pee in the ocean?

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I won't be trying it anytime soon. Don't want to.

La Vache qui rit is a sin against cheese.

It seems that you missed my "tongue in cheek" comments. I offer my opinions, I'm not wagging a finger. And while we're at it why don't we just agree to disagree?


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Cancoillotte is a regional product, but it is readily available at most supermarkets in the Paris region and in many other parts of France. So one may assume that is has become fairly common as a national (sort-of) cheese. It is available as plain or garlic cancoillotte.

It is not really used like cheese but as an accompaniment to warm foods like poached Morteau sausage (+ a salad), boiled vegetables, pot-au-feu, etc. It is more a condiment than a cheese.

I wouldn't compare it to Velveeta, Velveeta is more like Vache Qui Rit. Cancoillotte is quite unique, unlike anything else. The best analogy I could find would be the runny part of a ripe camembert, shiny and almost translucent, with a mild taste and a slightly rubbery texture. It is neither for "ordinary tastes" (if there is such a thing) nor for sophisticated tastes, it is only, and simply, quite delicious.

With all of these qualifications, it may well be worth a taste, no? :raz:


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Cancoillotte is a regional product, but it is readily available at most supermarkets in the Paris region and in many other parts of France. So one may assume that is has become fairly common as a national (sort-of) cheese. It is available as plain or garlic cancoillotte.

It is not really used like cheese but as an accompaniment to warm foods like poached Morteau sausage (+ a salad), boiled vegetables, pot-au-feu, etc. It is more a condiment than a cheese.

I wouldn't compare it to Velveeta, Velveeta is more like Vache Qui Rit. Cancoillotte is quite unique, unlike anything else. The best analogy I could find would be the runny part of a ripe camembert, shiny and almost translucent, with a mild taste and a slightly rubbery texture. It is neither for "ordinary tastes" (if there is such a thing) nor for sophisticated tastes, it is only, and simply, quite delicious.

With all of these qualifications, it may well be worth a taste, no? :raz:

How do I answer as subtlely and politely as possible? Non, non, non! :raz: If I wanted a cheese sauce/condiment that tasted of ripe camembert with the consistency of a fondue I would simply make one. It doesn't take much time at all. I would peel the camembert (which is a staple in our frigo) give the rind to my 6 year old to eat (she loves the stuff, eats the cheese outside in anyway), add a little of this or that, voila sauce.

As for La vache qui rit, the laughing cow, I still have nightmares about it. The cheap package with 1,2,3,4,5,6 little wedges of cheese wrapped in foil. The surprise inside, cheese that had the mouthfeel of a poorly made roux. The film it left it left in my 4 year old mouth. The horror! :laugh:


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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"La vache qui rit." I'm reminded of it's cousin, not Velveeta, but it's European cousin, crème de Gruyère[/e] not to be confused with Gruyère at least not with the aged piece I bought the other day. That stuff, let's not call it cheese, in silver foil triangles used to appear in gourmet food baskets all over America at one time and may still do that. It's a horrid soapy stuff made from leftover bits of inferior cheese whipped up with chemicals and stabilziers, but it was imported and passed for fancy food and, as I said, may still do in some quarters, as no doubt La Vache Qui Rit all the way to the bank does.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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La Vache qui rit is a sin against cheese.

It's all in the context. Shortly after the War, when I was 18, on my first trip to France, bicycling from Chartres to the Point du Raz, I thought "La vache" was a revelation; my grandkiddies still do. Hey back in the 1950's our Mom's used to make grilled cheese with what we now think of an unspeakably industrial yellow Kraft cheese and in memory anyway, it wasn't all bad.

"Context, history and memory distortion" help us appreciate how come it still sells.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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All of this talk about "processed cheese products" wrapped in foil reminds me of a true abomination - the Apericube. It was served to me at a French friend's house - the only thing I've had to spit out in my napkin in a long time...

Alright, I am going to try this Cancoillotte product and give my report, if I can find some in my neighborhood tonight.

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I had my first Cancoillotte in a traditional one star restaurant in the Franche Comté during the 80ies. I found it quite good, a kind of a poor man's Mont d'Or. I could immagine there's artisanal cancoillotte and there's industrial junk cancoillotte, just like with, say, Emmentaler cheese.

There's a similar, traditional product (at least wrt. production method, I suspect) in Austria called "Kochkäse", "Glundner-Kas". You can buy it from very rich, creamy to fat free variants.


Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler.

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How do I answer as subtlely and politely as possible? Non, non, non!  :raz:  If I wanted a cheese sauce/condiment that tasted of ripe camembert with the consistency of a fondue I would simply make one.  It doesn't take much time at all. I would peel the camembert (which is a staple in our frigo) give the rind to my 6 year old to eat (she loves the stuff, eats the cheese outside in anyway), add a little of this or that, voila sauce.

Um, you would booger around with a piece of Camembert instead of just eating it?

My "poor man's" comment had nothing to do with the quality of the cheese, but with the fact that it's made with skim milk. I was assuming that the cream had been skimmed for use in some other more luxurious product.

It's not (if internet sources are to be believed) not even remotely a new cheese, and it looks as if pretty much all of the manufacturers are local to the original area and include both small and large producers. The brand I purchased actually bore a "small business labeling exception" tag instead of the usual required nutritional info tag.


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i'm born in Lure, in franche comte, a Lure, there everybody, but me, love cancoillotte ... it was call "fromagere"in the old time and home made, specially in haute saone, in Lure ... my grand mother make some ... i have a recipe from the book "franche-comte" i give you the ingredients only cause i try to translate it but to many words i don't know in english ... if someone is interested i translate it ... the main business seems to make the milk "curdle" ( cailler ) ... and heat it

1 milk liter without cream ( lait ecreme )

100 grs of butter

5 cl of milk with cream ( lait non ecreme )

one "pod" ? of garlic ( gousse d'ail )

salt

peper

in my memory this "cheese" is almost liquid, maybe some people like it more or less liquid, i don't know ... they eat it on hot bread most of the time ... i was raise by my grand-grand-mother, she love, use to love that cheese, but i think she doesn't eat as much as she want cause i hate the odor, my grand mother use to love me better than cancoillotte

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How do I answer as subtlely and politely as possible? Non, non, non!  :raz:  If I wanted a cheese sauce/condiment that tasted of ripe camembert with the consistency of a fondue I would simply make one.  It doesn't take much time at all. I would peel the camembert (which is a staple in our frigo) give the rind to my 6 year old to eat (she loves the stuff, eats the cheese outside in anyway), add a little of this or that, voila sauce.

Um, you would booger around with a piece of Camembert instead of just eating it?

My "poor man's" comment had nothing to do with the quality of the cheese, but with the fact that it's made with skim milk. I was assuming that the cream had been skimmed for use in some other more luxurious product.

It's not (if internet sources are to be believed) not even remotely a new cheese, and it looks as if pretty much all of the manufacturers are local to the original area and include both small and large producers. The brand I purchased actually bore a "small business labeling exception" tag instead of the usual required nutritional info tag.

I reread my post and I said IF I wanted this type of cheese/condiment sauce I would

just make it. I didn't say that I would make it.

What is boogering?


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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i'm born in Lure, in franche comte, a Lure, there everybody, but me, love cancoillotte ... it was call "fromagere"in the old time and home made, specially in haute saone, in Lure ... my grand mother make some ... i have a  recipe from the book "franche-comte" i give you the ingredients only cause i try to translate it but to many words i don't know in english ... if someone is interested i translate it ...  the main business seems to make the milk  "curdle" ( cailler ) ... and heat it

1 milk liter without cream ( lait ecreme )

100 grs of butter

5 cl of milk with cream ( lait non ecreme )

one "pod" ? of garlic ( gousse d'ail )

salt

peper

in my memory this "cheese" is almost liquid, maybe some people like it more or less liquid, i don't know ... they eat it on hot bread most of the time ... i was raise by my grand-grand-mother, she love, use to love that cheese, but i think she doesn't eat as much as she want cause i hate the odor, my grand mother use to love me better than cancoillotte

This is the version that I would try. Thank you for the recipe.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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La Vache qui rit is a sin against cheese.

It's all in the context. Shortly after the War, when I was 18, on my first trip to France, bicycling from Chartres to the Point du Raz, I thought "La vache" was a revelation; my grandkiddies still do. Hey back in the 1950's our Mom's used to make grilled cheese with what we now think of an unspeakably industrial yellow Kraft cheese and in memory anyway, it wasn't all bad.

"Context, history and memory distortion" help us appreciate how come it still sells.

Yes, context. They serve La Vache in the First Class Lounge of Asiana Airlines in Seoul. They sincerely offered it me as French Cheese.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Yes, context. They serve La Vache in the First Class Lounge of Asiana Airlines in Seoul. They sincerely offered it me as French Cheese.

Which I suppose, is why I don't search out Korean food in Paris. :biggrin:

gdg, in the US we refer to milk without the cream as "skim milk," and milk with the cream in it as "whole milk." Most dairies in the US now sell milk with various percentages of cream. There is skim milk with no cream, 1% milk with 1% cream, 2% milk and whole milk which I believe generally contains about 4% cream.

The cream is removed from the milk and sold at a much higher price, but the resultant skim milk is no cheaper to buy. Skim milk is no less expensive, just inferior. :biggrin:


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Yes, context. They serve La Vache in the First Class Lounge of Asiana Airlines in Seoul. They sincerely offered it me as French Cheese.

I actually like Vache Qui Rit. And it's very nice in a Vietnamese roadside sandwich. (Context!) :wink:

To horrify the audience a little further: I love Apéricubes too, they're my favorite kind of French decadent gastronomy. The tomato Apéricube is tops.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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Yes, context. They serve La Vache in the First Class Lounge of Asiana Airlines in Seoul. They sincerely offered it me as French Cheese.

I actually like Vache Qui Rit. And it's very nice in a Vietnamese roadside sandwich. (Context!) :wink:

To horrify the audience a little further: I love Apéricubes too, they're my favorite kind of French decadent gastronomy. The tomato Apéricube is tops.

In my mind all of your past and future posts will be forever tainted by your "confession."

:laugh::raz:


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

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Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

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Skim milk is no less expensive, just inferior.  :biggrin:

Entirely a matter of preference. I despise non-skim milk, having grown up drinking skim milk from my grandmother's cows (Guernseys and Jerseys). Cream was skimmed and used separately or to make butter (cultured, with real buttermilk left behind).

I like neither the mouth feel nor the taste of whole milk (it seems somehow rancid), and homogenized milk is a perversion.

Just my opinion, of course...


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