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Kuih / Kueh


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Also, don't know if you have it in indonesia but in singapore they sell mung-bean cakes fried up goreng pisang style. Ah... to be back in singapore :raz:

Do you mean these? We call them gandasturi, do you remember what they're called in Singapore? One of my favorite places -- shop 'til ya drop & eat to the beat. The food, the food!!

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Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Odading fluffy pillows of deep fried dough.  Delicious fresh, hot out of the wok -- great for dunking in morning tea or coffee.

I've never heard of odading before but I have a long-held belief that any type of dough that's deep fried has to taste good. :biggrin: What does it taste like? Is it more like donut or yu char kway?

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Odading is the sister of yu char kway, just a sweet, denser version. Why do these things taste best when fresh? They're awful even an hour old!

Floss is abon dried, shredded & fried meat. I've seen a variety of floss: pork, beef, chicken, fish, shrimp & squid. It's the topping on the nasi kuning we're having for lunch here today to celebrate a co-worker's birthday.

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Where's the sambal?!?

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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  • 2 weeks later...

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Here's a specialty of Bandung, pisang molen /pastry wrapped banana.

This one is stuffed with a little cheese stick. These buttery pastries come with chocolate, too!

They make great oleh-oleh or gifts/souvenirs, and I've seen people come out of the bakeries with armloads of boxes.

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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I tried something this weekend that may or may not fit in the kuih category, but it was very good and I'm trying to figure out how to make it at home. They appeared to be made out of fresh cassava, grated coconut, coconut milk, and possibly other ingredients. They're fried and look exactly like an unglazed donut. I'm fairly sure it's Malaysian. The woman who made them is from Perak; unfortunately, she doesn't speak English and nobody could translate it for me very well. Anyone have any idea of what these are called and how to make them?

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Anyone have any idea of what these are called and how to make them?

Is it sweet or savory? Do you know if it was cut into its shape? What color is it? Do you know if it was steamed first and them pan fried? Was it deep fried?

I need more clues, but I like this game already :raz: Maybe in the meantime, someone who really knows can provide an answer.

Edited by Laksa (log)
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I tried something this weekend that may or may not fit in the kuih category, but it was very good and I'm trying to figure out how to make it at home. They appeared to be made out of fresh cassava, grated coconut, coconut milk, and possibly other ingredients. They're fried and look exactly like an unglazed donut. I'm fairly sure it's Malaysian. The woman who made them is from Perak; unfortunately, she doesn't speak English and nobody could translate it for me very well. Anyone have any idea of what these are called and how to make them?

Do they look like these http://yulabme.textamerica.com/?r=618072? If it's that, they're called kuih keria. It's usually made from sweet potato though ... but cassava (that's tapioca right?) could be a Perak variation.

Don't have a personal recipe for kuih keria but TP may still have the kuih keria recipe she learnt in school. TP :raz: ?

If not, I should have one in some recipe book at home and can PM you it if you like.

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Thanks for the quick reply. The kuih keria sounds right. I should have paid more attention to your foodblog, Shewie. This was definitely made with cassava/tapioca but fresh not flour. I think I'll experiment. It tastes quite a bit like the cassava mash that I make every now and then. I just don't shape it and fry.

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My mother recently hosted a little tea party for about 100 guests. Here are some of the kueh she served.

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The banana leaf lined bamboo nampan holds an array of mini cakes - kueh ku shaped in pastel fruits, dadar gulung stuffed with sweet grated coconut. The top right is kueh cocorot, palm sugar & rice flour cornets. And below that are some gemblong, deep fried & glazed sweet sticky rice & shredded coconut cakes.

Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Don't have a personal recipe for kuih keria but TP may still have the kuih keria recipe she learnt in school. TP  :raz: ?

Now, Shiewie, you jest! You should know that I've left the bangku sekolah for donkey years already! Unless....unless....you are fooled by my (uh, hem) youthful looks??? Sorry, no recipe.

Yetty, a 'little' tea party, you say? I can't imagine a regular size party! Yummy, yummy, yummy. Those tea time treats look too good to eat.

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Yetty, a 'little' tea party, you say? I can't imagine a regular size party! Yummy, yummy, yummy. Those tea time treats look too good to eat.

There were still more kueh after these, too!

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The mini kueh were special ordered, but the rest were homemade. You don't want to know what the kitchens looked like!

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Yeah, how big is a "big" tea party at your mother's? She has lots of friends! Or is it that they're just coming for the food? :shock::laugh:

Seriously, that looks like a Hari Raya spread. Amazing.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Yeah, how big is a "big" tea party at your mother's? She has lots of friends! Or is it that they're just coming for the food?  :shock:  :laugh:

Seriously, that looks like a Hari Raya spread. Amazing.

Heheh my absolutely brilliant mother. People always want to come to their house to visit and eat, and often invite themselves over even if it's just a simple meal. The thing is she's a wonderful, wonderful cook, her food is not always "photo worthy" but what lacks in appearance & presentation is certainly made up in taste. :raz:

Hari Raya is coming up soon. :shock:

Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Terrific pictures as always. I'm starving now. The bamboo nampan reminds me of the sweets of my childhood in the Philippines. They were served similarly but were mostly flat cakes. My favorite was usually the one that was made up of different colored layers. We also have something like the kueh cocorot. I think most people eat it with coconut jam, but I like it with just a sprinkle of sugar. The donut things in the bottom left of the second set of pictures looks exactly like the donuts I was asking about last week.

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  • 1 month later...

The array of kueh found at the local Asian supermarket is actually quite delightful!

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But I've become very enamored with these spongecakes. They're so light and fluffy, and their charm is how moist they are.

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Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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But I've become very enamored with these spongecakes.  They're so light and fluffy, and their charm is how moist they are.

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Those spongecakes are in every single Chinese bakery here in NY. If I leave the house early for school, I can get one still warm from the oven at a really great local place. For 40 cents a pop, they're great.

There is a ridiculously small and overpriced selection of kuih in the asian grocers around here though. Best selection I've found so far was in flushing, and even that was mediocre.

Edited by Transparent (log)
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The word "Kuih or Kueh" (Malay?) sounds very similar to the Chinese word 糕 (Gao [Mandarin] and Go [Cantonese]). It generally refers to these cakes, sweets and such. That makes me wonder if the word Keuh has a Chinese origin.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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The word "Kuih or Kueh" (Malay?) sounds very similar to the Chinese word 糕 (Gao [Mandarin] and Go [Cantonese]).  It generally refers to these cakes, sweets and such.  That makes me wonder if the word Keuh has a Chinese origin.

I've noticed that too. Whenever I show some kinds of kuih to my parents, they tell me its Cantonese name, and it ends with goh. Kuih refers to a much broader array of foods, so perhaps Chinese just adapted the word goh to kuih.

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