Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

I discoverd injera a week or so ago at one of our local Ethiopian groceries. I bought a huge package of it and really didn't know what to do with it all. I made a beef wat, of sorts, and it was fabulous with that. So what to do with the other 4.75 pounds of it? I froze most of it, but left out a quarter of it. I decided to see how well it fried. Its *#$%$@%^& AWESOME!!!!!

I cut it in thick strips and fried it, and have plans to dip it in hummus if there happens to be any left over. I keep wandering into the kitchen to snag a strip and munch. Thin, crunchy, sour... its really quite divine.

Has anyone ever tried this? I fried them in the same oil that I used for frying vada, so the oil imparted some lovely flavors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love injera too. I like to eat leftover injera for breakfast as the bread that goes with some spicy scrambled eggs. Especially with butter melted over it.

Haven't tried frying it yet, but the addition of tomatoes and chilies is similar to fit-fit, a salad great for leftover injera. Chop it up with chopped red onion, jalapenos, tomatoes and garlic, and mix with lemon juice, melted butter and salt and pepper, let sit for a bit to let the flavors sythesize, and eat. :wub:

Pat

Edited by Sleepy_Dragon (log)

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Color me ignorant, but what is nitter kibbe? Is it a variation on the lebanese lamb and bulgar kibbe? I'm intrigued.

While I loved the fried injera, it was realllllllly oily, so I think I'm going to lightly oil and season the strips next time and bake them or broil them. I'm thinking they will be stellar with baba ganouj. :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Niter kibe is spiced butter. Delicious heavenly spiced butter. My favorite Ethiopian restaurants always have a nice oil slick of it over the food, hehe. It makes the injera lined underneath the food so rich and juicy!

I posted a recipe in an earlier thread out of one of my books, towards the bottom.

Pat

Edited by Sleepy_Dragon (log)

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My pleasure to do so, Elie!

Injera is an Ethiopian flatbread made out of a fermented teff flour batter. They are very thin, moist and flexible. Here it is quartered. You can see the bubbles, thats the top side. They are cooked only on one side, the bottom lacks the lacy look. They are typically cooked in these huge skillets and are used instead of utensils to scoop up food and sauce.

Very sour flavor, and just delicious!

i7735.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My pleasure to do so, Elie!

Injera is an Ethiopian flatbread made out of a fermented teff flour batter. They are very thin, moist and flexible. Here it is quartered. You can see the bubbles, thats the top side. They are cooked only on one side, the bottom lacks the lacy look. They are typically cooked in these huge skillets and are used instead of utensils to scoop up food and sauce.

Very sour flavor, and just delicious!

i7735.jpg

Very interesting, it looks like the Indian Dosa. Honestly, I have never had Ethiopian food. I think we have a restaurant in Houston, so I might check it out.

Thanks

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very interesting, it looks like the Indian Dosa. Honestly, I have never had Ethiopian food. I think we have a restaurant in Houston, so I might check it out.

Definitely check out that restaurant. Ethiopian food, when done well, is on par with any other nationality of cuisine.

If there's Ethiopians eating in the restaurant you go to, watch carefully the way they use the injera to make packets of food by pressing the food into the injera rather than just scooping it up and making a mess. In the hundreds of times I've dined at Ethiopian restaurants I have never seen an Ethiopian ever get food on themselves. Westerners, on the other hand, have a tendency to be complete slobs :smile:

It's all in the technique. Concentrate on getting the injera around the clump of food so a little pocket is formed. Ethiopians I've watched have an interesting rhythm. Presspresspresspresspresspressclose eat. It helps if the food isn't too watery or too chunky. The real secret is getting the most of the main dish with as little bread as possible. That will come with practice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

is also a millet i think.i like ragi too.

millet

For many years, food writers included millet as the key ingredient for the Ethiopian bread "injera", but now only about 5% of all injera is made from millet. Most utilize a grain that closely resembles millet, called teff.
Edited by gingerly (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Teff is the smallest of cultivated grains, being a fraction of millet's size. In fact its name is thought to be derived from a word in a regional dialect which means "lost." Aside from its flavour and nutritive value, its great distinction is that it is the most drought-hardy of grains, surely a recommendation in Ethiopia of all places.

Typically, in areas which may-or-may-not get enough water for other grains, maize will be attempted first, with millet and then teff as the fall-back crops. I'm assuming that this would be due to the relative yields of the crops; and the relative difficulty of milling teff given its tininess.

I think I have a little bit left in my cupboard as I write this. It's bloody expensive stuff, about $13/lb when I bought it last. Remarkably tasty stuff, though.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally I can't find similarities between dosa and injera, which seem to be at the opposite sides of a cathegory of food that, maybe, has in its middle our Ligurian "Panigacci". Dosas are crispy, crunchy and tasty, while injera is soft, fluffy and has a sour taste that I never found in dosas.

Anyway, an odd thing happens to me! Every time I make dosas, I get something pretty soft which doesn't look that much like the dosas I know and love :sad:

On the other side, the only time I tried to make injera I got perfect dosas! :blink::laugh:

But, even admitting that this result wasn't serendipitous :wink: the injera issue remains...so, I have some questions for those who can make it by scratch.

Since it's unlikely that I can find teff here in Genoa, where Ethiopians are few, which type of grain could I use? Some recipes I found suggest half white wheat flour and half maize flour, does it make sense? Am I supposed to add a leavening agent (some recipes call for natural yeast) or the batter must ferment by itself?

Another question: can I cook injera into a nonstick pan?

TIA!

Pongi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cringe when I see non teff injera recipes. Without the teff,it's not injera.

Do you have any Ethiopian restaurants near you? A restaurant will usually sell you some teff.

By the time you factor in shipping it's outrageously expensive, but here is one online source that ships internationally:

http://lib1.store.vip.sc5.yahoo.com/lib/tr...s/tfcatalog.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cringe when I see non teff injera recipes.  Without the teff,it's not injera.

That's not true. Teff injera is the staple but it is also made with other flour.

Since it's unlikely that I can find teff here in Genoa, where Ethiopians are few, which type of grain could I use? Some recipes I found suggest half white wheat flour and half maize flour, does it make sense? Am I supposed to add a leavening agent (some recipes call for natural yeast) or the batter must ferment by itself?

Another question: can I cook injera into a nonstick pan?

1. I would recomend trying to track down some Teff. I you do a google search there a several vendors listed that might ship internationally if you email them. Buckwheat injera is also good. Keep in mind that Ethiopians usually roast grains like buckwheat before grinding them.

2. In my family the batter is always left to ferment on the kitchen counter like you would a sourdough.

3. My mother has a large electric clay injera maker that she brought back from Addis for my wedding but I don't think she has ever used it. Her tool of choice is a large round non-stick electric griddle that I believe is marketed as a lefse (or maybe crepe) maker. Any flat (or slightly convex) round pans will work fine

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am looking for any information on an authentic injera recipe. I have tried all teff recipes, and I have tried recipes with a mixture of teff and wheat flours--none are as tastey as in restaurants. If anyone has a successful recipe, I'd be grateful to know about it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to have a recipe for injera...if this is the Ethiopian bread for dipping into food.

My ESL class is mostly Ethiopians and I have enjoyed their cooking many times. They have tried to tell me their recipe, but we still have a language problem :wink:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

HI: I was looking for info on Ethiopian recipes myself and used the search feature.

I found the following thread with lots of sources of recipes.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=36956

I had an idea for your ESL class. Maybe you could have a cooking class where the students show you how to make injera and you take good notes and measure what they are using. Then show them some quick American or British food, like french fries, grilled cheese, eggs, something easy. Then you could work on a recipe book that shows measurement. I know that most countries use the metric system but it might be a good experience for your students to see that some countries still persist in keeping their identities through old forms of measurement.

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...