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Charlie Trotter's


adrober
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I like Chicago.  I like food.

I like Chicago food.  I like food in Chicago.

Hint hint.

Matthew, have you ever been to Charlie Trotter's? :smile:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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And he explained it in his own way. Perhaps a poor choice of words, but that's the way I read it. He was referring to the perception that many people have of a deeply held belief, value, whatever -- mistaken or stereotyped as it may be -- of people belonging to a certain segment of society who identify themselves as "Jewish", not the religion as was interpreted by another person elsewhere in the thread.

I suppose that this is another line of debate that we can go mano-a-mano another time. :wink:

And I thought it was gently alluded that this part of the discussion was not encouraged to be pursued, but to return to Charlie Trotter, his restaurant, his food.... :hmmm:

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And I thought it was gently alluded that this part of the discussion was not encouraged to be pursued, but to return to Charlie Trotter, his restaurant, his food....    :hmmm:

Beans, we've got something we can agree on. Varmint was excellent when he said two days ago,

"People, please let's get this back on topic. We have a couple of articulate and thoughtful reviews of CT here. Focus on those. Otherwise, the big boys will have to close the thread.

Thank you."

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:cool:

Hobbes has been raring to go, as I recall. We should maybe put something together the next time Matthew's in town, Ronnie...?

:biggrin:

I haven't been to CT. I've been working on mid-priced dining in Chicago.

However, after how ever many posts--way too many--on this thread that barely, if ever, touch on the actual food at CT, I think we should go & take over this thread.

At the latest, I'll be in Chicago over New Year's.

Can this thread wait that long? :rolleyes:

:smile:

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:cool:

Hobbes has been raring to go, as I recall.  We should maybe put something together the next time Matthew's in town, Ronnie...?

:biggrin:

I can't think of a better scenario for my first visit to Charlie Trotter's than going there with my fellow Heartlanders. :wub:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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I haven't been to CT.  I've been working on mid-priced dining in Chicago.

However, after how ever many posts--way too many--on this thread that barely, if ever, touch on the actual food at CT, I think we should go & take over this thread.

At the latest, I'll be in Chicago over New Year's.

Can this thread wait that long?  :rolleyes:

:smile:

:biggrin::rolleyes::laugh:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Interesting series of posts here. Yes, Trotters can be intimidating - but, I too would have to agree with Gordon - admit up front that you are inexperienced and the staff will bend over backward to make you feel comfortable.

One of these days I'll have to relate the story of eating at the kitchen table one night when one of our party found a piece of plastic wrap that had not been removed from his sunchoke & asparagus terrine.

Mr. Trotter was not pleased!

(By the way- I mention this only because it appeared in two separate posts- the word is g-a-l-l not g-a-u-l ... though the mind reels at the jokes inherent in this particular homonym!)

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I've read all the comments to this subject.

I have one question after all that.

Since when does have good food to be an "experience"?

Is it not purely GOOD FOOD?!

All these wonderful, celebrated new "star chefs'" are not just cooks, or shouldn't be?

Personally I couldn't care less about a person's celebrity status, all I'm interested in is the food.

The fact, that we made these people some kind of stars, creates the unpleasant experiences some people have to live through in their restaurants, one way or the other.

Why does anybody have to pretend to be "an experienced diner", who is in the know of the current trend in food or wine?

Why do we ( well, some of us)make good chefs seem like half gods?!

They are not!

And their establishments should not intimidate anyone either.

And as for the bill... they should not rip anyone off!

All this hyp about restaurants, celebrity chefs makes me sick, really.

The people who actually cook at those places, are underpaid and not celebrities at all!

The whole idea of this "star chef status" and the the prices of the food, and the inviroment in the "star" restaurants is just not right!

I understand the price of prime ingredients. I understand the price of real estate, or renting.

I do not understand the price of being a "celebrity" restaurant.

I used to cook in restaurants in Vienna.

I was portrayed in magazines in that city.

I still believe, it is the love of good food,not the love of self, that should come through./

Sure, you all can say now, I was not successful enough, that's why I talk like this now.

Not true. My belief is, Good food is anywhere!

In fact, best food can be found in the most unexpected places!(hint, hint, Bourdin)

In any case, if we think, really great food comes only from" celebrity chefs'"

kitchens, we are in trouble.

Great food can be on our tables any day.

celebrity status doesn't mean the person will satisfy your tastebuds.

It doesn't mean it IS the epitome of food either.

It only means the person made it in business.

And don't let anyone tell you otherwise!

They will.

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Mitmondol, you writing an epic poem or something? Use the word wrap and hit return only between paragraphs please for readability's sake.

I think most people would agree with your sentiments, but there are some problems:

1) People do go to restaurants for more than the food: the wine, eg, the feeling of being treated special with quality service, the experience of being in a superior setting surrounded by nicely dressed people eating on fine china, etc. If it was just about the taste of the food, Thomas Keller and Charlie Trotter would be shlinging great tasting slop out of the back of a roach coach.

2) Few "celebrity" chefs (I put it in quotes, because very, very few chefs are celebrities to more than very small segment of the populace) are celebrities for reasons other than the quality of their restaurants, really. People like Emeril Lagasse, Tony Bourdain, Alton Brown, Julia Childs, etc, are the exception, not the rule. They just happen to be have even more broad notoriety than the rest of the "celebrities". Charlie Trotter is one of these lesser-known, more narrowly recognized celebrities whose fame comes from his quality restaurant more than anything. There may not be a perfect relationship between notoriety, acclaim, celebrity status, etc, and food quality, but there's rarely no relationship. Usually chefs get acclaim for a reason, their restaurants are good.

3) Just like any person in charge in any business, while the chef often isn't cooking the food on a day to day basis, he is the one who guides the restaurant. It is he who decides on and often creates dishes. It is he who ultimately guarantees the quality of the food, the service, and so on. Etc. The buck stops with him. He deserves the blame when things go wrong, and deserves the praise when things go right.

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In fact, best food can be found in the most unexpected places!(hint, hint, Bourdin)

Yeah, ask Tony about that look of utter bliss after his experience at the French Laundry.

If dining at the best if not for you, just say so. Don't slag it as if anyone who does is wrong and being conned. The phenonemon of elite restaurants long pre-dates the modern cult of the celebrity chef. It is rather nice to see chef's getting their due (and gaining economic power) now.

Why is there is need for these asinine pseudo-populist rants from people? Not once has anyone who appreciates the best restaurants ever said that is the only place to get good food and don't go anywhere or you are being swindled. Not once has anyone said to not ever darken the doors of our favorite temple of haute cuisine. It is actually the opposite- just like appreciating any art that is full of subtletly and grace, it does take time and exposure to gain maximum pleasure from it.

Learn to use a keyboard and read what people actually wrote since no one said anything you are claiming.

A.

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In fact, best food can be found in the most unexpected places!(hint, hint, Bourdin)

Yeah, ask Tony about that look of utter bliss after his experience at the French Laundry.

As I recall, he was pretty blissed out by the street food in Saigon and the Mexican pit roast, as well. In fact, in the book he's clearly more viscerally engaged by those two legs of the tour, than the jaunt to Napa.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Yeah, I think he was trying to post in iambic pentameter. :raz:

hehe

Soba

Speak not against the haute cuisine Chef Trotter serves

Lest Bux condemn thy palate twice, with scowl

Nor criticize poussin lest thou observe

‘Tis not a fish, but faith, a sexless fowl.

Of wretched excess speak you not, china

Plates and crystal stems aren't meant for censure,

Such cosseting of a joyful diner

Oft joins the food to enhance the pleasure.

Of this debate, let one more phrase be spoke:

Viz: Different strokes for different folks

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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:cool:

Hobbes has been raring to go, as I recall.  We should maybe put something together the next time Matthew's in town, Ronnie...?

:biggrin:

I can't think of a better scenario for my first visit to Charlie Trotter's than going there with my fellow Heartlanders. :wub:

=R=

:biggrin:

This is beginning to sound like an evolving plan. Very well: Hobbes (are you in town around that time, signor?), Edemuth, Ronnie, MatthewB, yours truly...Gentle G, you and the ever-patient Flaca in if we can all make the scheduling work? Aurora? Mags and the Handsome One? You game to take the Travelling Riot as far upscale-and-eccentric as it gets in these parts short of Trio?

:biggrin:

Edited to clarify: This would NOT be for New Year's Eve, on which night the only place to be for us Heartlanders is gonna be at Guajolote's. I'm looking at the previous two days -- the 29th and 30th of December -- and at Friday, the 2nd of January. Opinions?

:biggrin:

Edited by Lady T (log)

Me, I vote for the joyride every time.

-- 2/19/2004

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I have not had the opportunity to eat there, though I very much would like to.

I'm just an observer fascinated by the little religious war that has broken out between the fine diners and the populists, who finds both merit and absurdity on both sides. And who wanted to see if I could still write in iambic pentameter if an emergency arose.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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