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Korean Namul and Banchan

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buchu jeon (부추전)

garlic chive pancake

ingredients

<b>2 bunches garlic chives (buchu)

1 handful shrimp, clam or oyster meat (optional)

3/4 cup flour

3 tablespoons mochiko (sweet rice flour)

3 eggs

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

3/4 cup water

oil for frying</b>

<ol><li>rinse, then shake dry the garlic chives. pick out any dried out leaves. chop them into 5 cm lengths. set aside.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041019buchu2.jpg"></center>

<li>if using seafood, clean and prep by chopping into small pieces. this time i used a handful of shrimp i found in the freezer. i defrosted them in cold water, took off the shells and chopped them fine. set aside.

<li>in a large bowl, mix flour, mochiko, eggs, salt and pepper and water. mix well. gently fold in the chives and seafood, if using.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041019buchu3.jpg"></center>

<li>turn the stove to medium high and heat a couple tablespoons of oil in a frypan. when the oil is hot, add heaping spoonfuls of the batter. make them any size you want. this time i made them pretty small. but they can be two, three or even four times that size.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041019buchu4.jpg"></center>

<li>fry on each side, until the sides are slightly browned. add more oil as needed.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041019buchu5.jpg"></center>

<li>serve with chojang (recipe at the bottom).</ol>

<i>notes:<blockquote>buchu is apparently sometimes called garlic chives or chinese chives. they are not the same thing as regular chives. the regular western chives are shaped like straws. buchu, on the other hand, is flat and shaped like loooong blades of grass. i looked it up and i believe the scientific name is </i>Allium tuberosum<i>. i know for a fact that these are found as weeds in america. as a child, i went into the forest with my mother and gathered them where she made jeon and buchu kimchi. also, i have collected buchu in public parks in maryland and in virginia.

when sold at stores, they are typically sold in bunches (regular chopsticks for size reference):

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041019buchu.jpg"></center></blockquote></i>

<hr width = "65%">

chojang

dipping sauce

ingredients

<b>1 part water

1.5 parts vinegar

3 parts soy sauce</b>

<ol><li>mix all three ingredients in a jar or small bowl.

<li>if desired, add some or all of the following:

<blockquote><ul><li>sesame seeds

<li>gochuggaru (korean chile powder)

<li>finely chopped scallions</ul></ol>

<i>notes:<blockquote>i usually make this so that the water is equal to 1/4 of a cup. i store the rest in the fridge for later use, using only about half a cup for one night.

this sauce is also used for any other kind of jeon and for mandu.

you can up the gochuggaru content.</blockquote></i>


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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gorgeous!

are they commonly made in small sizes like that?

I usually see them as one large fry pan sized piece that is then cut into smaller pieces. I like the little ones! :biggrin:

and the garlic chives are called nira in Japanese and should be available at Japanese markets as well.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I love these garlic chive pancakes! I've had them in various sizes...individual to the larger pancake-sized ones as well.

I forget how easy these things are to make.

Though I never really make any banchan myself. I always end up buying from the banchan bar at my local grocery when I eat Korean food.

However, this thread may inspire me to make some of my own! :biggrin:

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<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi06.jpg"></center>

<b>anchovy stir fry sidedish</b> (green pepper and anchovy stir fry)

멸치볶음 (멸치 풋고추 볶음)

2 cups of dried anchovies, picked over

8 korean green chile peppers, sliced into thick strips

2 red jalapenos, sliced into strips

8 cloves garlic, sliced thin

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 tablespoons water

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1.5 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon of sake or cooking wine

a drop of sesame seed oil

toasted sesame seeds

<ol><li>prep the ingredients. pick over the anchovies, making sure the anchovies are clean. slice the chile peppers, jalapenos and garlic.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi.jpg"></center>

<li>in a non stick pan, fry the anchovies over medium high heat WITHOUT oil for a couple minutes. move the anchovies to a bowl for the time being.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi02.jpg"></center>

<li>in the now empty pan, add two tablespoons of cooking oil. fry the korean green chile peppers, the jalapenos and the garlic for about three minutes, until the garlic has cooked through and the green chile shave brightened.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi03.jpg"></center>

<li>add the water, the soy sauce, sugar and sake. mix well. keep stirring so that the sugar dissolves and so that the water starts to evaporate and the sauce thickens.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi04.jpg"></center>

<li>after about two minutes, when the sauce has thickened a bit and the bubbles are bigger, dump in all the anchovies and stir well.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi05.jpg"></center>

<li>keep stir frying until the dish dries out a little bit, but take care not to burn.

<li>add a little bit of sesame seed oil for flavor and top with toasted sesame seeds, if desired. (i didnt this time around.)</ol>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi06.jpg"></center>

<hr width = "65%">

notes:<blockquote><ul><li>you can find anchovies (멸치, myeolchi) at the korean supermarket. they will be labeled as dried anchovies and in korean, they will be labeled as 볶음멸치 (bokkeum myeolchi). they come in a variety of sizes for different uses (stir fries or for use in making soup base) but the ones im using for this dish average 4 cm from head to tail.

you can use iriko in this recipe (it is the same thing as myeolchi, actually). if they are too large, just pull off the heads and take out the innards before cooking. the iriko below are kind of on the large side, although there are even larger grades.

some folks pull the heads and innards out for even the small guys. thats too fussy for me. besides, this dish still tastes good with the heads! but any larger than 4 cm, id probably pull the heads off too.

<center> a "special" grade from korea. a little more expensive than the regular stuff. was used this time around.

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi07.jpg"></center>

<center>another brand on the left and japanese iriko on the right.

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi08.jpg"></center>

<li>korean green chile peppers (풋고추, put gochu) are korean red chiles that have not yet matured. they are not as spicy as when they are red. they are eaten raw (often dipped into chile paste or in soy bean paste or a mixture of both) or cooked in stews and stirfries. <a href="http://images.google.com/images?q=%ED%92%8B%EA%B3%A0%EC%B6%94&hl=en&lr=&sa=N&tab=wi">put gochu images from google</a>. these green chile peppers can be more spicy than bell peppers, but are generally pretty mild.

<center>at one of the stores, they label them as "korean chilli" (sic)

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi09.jpg"></center>

<center>a close up of "put gochu", korean green chile pepper

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041024myeolchi10.jpg"></center>

<li>since the green peppers are not very spicy, i have added jalapenos. i have chosen red ones for their color. they are optional, as are the korean green chiles.

<li>i have made this dish with walnuts and pecans. they are an interesting addition. you can add them when you stir fry the garlic and peppers.

<li>you can go the other extreme and do this dish with ONLY the anchovies. that tastes good too. be sure to increase the anchovies for the amount of seasoning if you want to do that...</ul></blockquote>thank you for reading.


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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Wow, Melonpan, this is great; thanks especially for all the great photos detailing everything....I usually buy my banchan to go, and my pancakes from a place that makes them on weekends mornings, but I'm gonnah give it a try..

I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?

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melonpan,

thank you for the recipe for that anchovy dish!!!!!

I have eaten it a couple times and even seen recipes for it but now I am going to try it!! :biggrin:

In Japan, most of the recipes use shishito, a Japanese green pepper on the very mildly spicy side. I might give it a try with that as chile peppers are hard to come by here.....


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?
maybe you are thinking about bindaeddeok (빈대떡)? they are made with mung beans. flour or mashed. i dont actually know. but i think this is a good chance for me to find out and maybe even try cooking. as a kid, i never liked bindaeddeok, not if there was good jeon around. but now i can appreciate it and even like it when other people order.

i will look into learning how to make it, but i am unable to do anything in the immediate future. when i have the chance, i will post here.


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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continuing on the jangajji...

back on the 22 (oct) i drained the jars of vinegar and added soy sauce. the veggies had lost some water and since i needed one of the jars for some soup i had made i combined all the veggies from one of the jars into another.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041104jang.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041104jang2.jpg"></center>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041104jang3.jpg"></center>

<center>you can see the lid that i stick on top (left photo) to keep the veggies under.

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041104jang4.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041104jang5.jpg"></center>

the jangajji is just a step away from being done.. i had one of the carrots today. they were an experiment. i had never done (or seen this) jangajji with carrots... and now i think i know why. they get kind of soft. they were much more promising just under the vinegar. but they dont seem to hold up under the soy sauce. the garlic was crunchalicious though.

anyhow, if i can find time this weekend (maybe on monday if i cant find time earlier) i will drain the soy sauce out. this time, i will reserve the soy sauce. i threw away the vinegar, but i think if i were more frugal, i would have saved it... found a use for it somehow. wish i did now. experiment. for next time.

my mom has taught me to boil the reserved soy sauce to get rid of the excess water from the veggies. then you use the soy sauce for making dipping sauces. its SPICY good! (example: for mandu or for cha dol baegi)

after you drain the soy sauce, you leave the veggies in the jar in the fridge. you take out small batches and mix them with sugar to taste and enjoy as a banchan. photos will be posted again later when i do this.


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?
maybe you are thinking about bindaeddeok (빈대떡)? they are made with mung beans. flour or mashed. i dont actually know. but i think this is a good chance for me to find out and maybe even try cooking. as a kid, i never liked bindaeddeok, not if there was good jeon around. but now i can appreciate it and even like it when other people order.

i will look into learning how to make it, but i am unable to do anything in the immediate future. when i have the chance, i will post here.

follow up to this...

did some online research and found that most bindaeddeok is made from rehydrated, then ground (in a blender) dried mung beans. i have found a recipe for a bindaeddeok made from ground soybeans (fried okara patties is another way to put it). i have purchased the mung beans and when i get a chance i will post the results of my try at bindaeddeok. it will be some time probably, though.


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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It's been a while since I've made it, but I used dried mung beans which I soaked in water and then whirred in a blender until very smooth. I think others might whir it less than me. It's actually really easy with a blender.

I made mine pretty thin and throw stuff in it like seafood (I like baby octopus, small shrimp) and maybe a little almost-over-the-hill kimchi. The appeal of bindaeddeok for me are the seafood treasures and the vinegary soy dipping sauce, with the creamy pancake background.

For once I have to say that I don't appreciate the supermarket version. So far in my experience, they've all been quite poor.

great pics!


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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<center><b>hobak jeon (호박전)

fried korean squash</b>

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak6.jpg"></center>

2 korean hobak (squash)

2 eggs

2 tablespoons flour

salt and pepper

<ol><li>rinse, pat dry squash. slice into coins, about 1 cm thick.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak4.jpg"></center>

<li>prepare flour by adding salt and pepper and mixing well. crack eggs into a small bowl (large enough to lay the coins of squash flat) and whip them with chopsticks until just mixed.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak2.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak3.jpg"></center>

<li>dip both sides of a slice of hobak in flour, making sure the entire surface is well dusted with flour. then dip the dusted squash in the egg. make sure that it is completely covered with beaten eggs, then pan fry in oil.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak5.jpg"></center>

<li>serve with chojang, a mixture of soy sauce and vinegar. you can add korean chile powder (gochugaru) to taste, or you can use some of the jangajji soy sauce you may have around.</ol>

<hr width = "65%">

<i>notes:<blockquote>you can buy hobak at korean grocery markets. but if you want, you can substitute zucchini with very similar results.</blockquote></i>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com/~coconut/eg/04/041108hobak.jpg"></center>


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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This is a great thread.

I'm looking for a recipe for a potato banchan. it is usually quartered or halved potatoes that are sweet and a little crispy. it seems like they have been fried and then boiled in syrup? does anyone have the recipe?

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I have never heard of anything like that, but it sounds kinda like simmered potatoes in soy sauce and a little bit of sugar (if you want sweetness). However that technique makes the potatoes mushy and not crispy.


BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

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I think it is an adaptation of gam-ja. I have had it at various restaurants in the SF bay area. Has anyone eaten at Han Yang Korean Bar-B-Q in Hayward or Seoul House in Oakland? They have this particular banchan there. They were similar to Japanese daigakuimo but not as sweet.

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I am not quite sure what you're talking about here, John, so it might be a newer creation using Korean flavors. Like Sheen said, a similar preparation is "gamja jorim" (gamja=potato, jorim=stewed or simmered in a flavorful sauce). We make it at home with small whole red potatoes (in their jackets) the size of ping pong or golf balls and par-boil them until half cooked, and then finish cooking to just-done by simmering in soy sauce, a bit of water, sugar to taste (some restaurants make it quite sweet), and if you like, a clove or 2 of crushed garlic. Once they're done, sprinkle with some toasted sesame seeds.

This preparation is also great with "goguma" (sweet potato). Same preparation, except don't make the liquid too salty, because the cut sweet potatoes will absorb more salt from the soy sauce.

Another great potato banchan is to cut some peeled potatoes into matchsticks and sauté them with lots of chopped garlic, some green Korean peppers, some sliced onion, and sesame seeds. The trick is to sauté the the potatoes until they are about 75% cooked. There should still be a bit of crunch in the center. Season with salt, sesame oil and finish with a flurry of chopped green onion. Its a nice breakfast too with a fried egg!

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Another great potato banchan is to cut some peeled potatoes into matchsticks and sauté them with lots of chopped garlic, some green Korean peppers, some sliced onion, and sesame seeds. The trick is to sauté the the potatoes until they are about 75% cooked. There should still be a bit of crunch in the center. Season with salt, sesame oil and finish with a flurry of chopped green onion. Its a nice breakfast too with a fried egg!

whoa, I forgot all about that panchan. I haven't had that since I was a wee lass, and I think i'm going to whip some up for lunch. That stuff is fantastic, and you're right about leaving it 25% uncooked. It's crunchiness is key.


BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

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gallery_41378_5233_125082.jpg

I made these two side dishes from recipes over at Just Bento - on the left is asparagus in a gochujang-miso sauce, and on the right are green beans and carrot with ginger. I guess they're more technically Japanese, but any small vegetable side dish will always be banchan to me, so I decided to post them here. We need some sort of pan-asian fusion thread to honour the cold-veggie side dish tradition.

Actually, I almost put both of these in the recipes that rock thread, because they're soooooooo yummy. Perfect with a cold beer while waiting for hubby to get home from the train.

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I get Korean takeout quite often and the banchan of course varies from week to week. Last week for the first time I received a single hotdog, diagonally slivered and lightly browned. I was just curious if this is traditional anywhere, or if the women at my carryout just really like hot dogs.

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Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc.

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war.

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew. It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc. It was a favorite dish growing up (:


BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

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Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc. 

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war. 

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew.  It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc.  It was a favorite dish growing up (:

Yeah, I know hotdogs can be used in stuff, but I've never been presented a naked lonely hotdog as banchan. I felt somewhat cheated.

I expect extra fish cake on my next visit to make up for it.

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Yeah, Korean banchan is a bit like a box of chocolates. Sometimes you get the truffle, and sometimes you get the nougat....or a naked hot dog, as it were.

I recently started making my own banchan, and found two really good recipes in "The Korean Table" - the potatoes in soy and sweet sauce, which were absolute gold - whenever I got these in Korea, it was a red-letter day, so I was so happy to make them at home.

And I made my favourite daikon strips, without which no bibimbap is complete, in my eyes. These are great, I'll be making them all the time.

gallery_41378_5233_51153.jpg

Now if I could just figure out how to make those sweet black beans...

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Is that moo saengchae? I had some tonight with with bossam....extra extra tasty (:


BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

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Yeah, Korean banchan is a bit like a box of chocolates. Sometimes you get the truffle, and sometimes you get the nougat....or a naked hot dog, as it were.

I recently started making my own banchan, and found two really good recipes in "The Korean Table" - the potatoes in soy and sweet sauce, which were absolute gold - whenever I got these in Korea, it was a red-letter day, so I was so happy to make them at home.

And I made my favourite daikon strips, without which no bibimbap is complete, in my eyes. These are great, I'll be making them all the time.

gallery_41378_5233_51153.jpg

Now if I could just figure out how to make those sweet black beans...

Nakji,

here is the recipe for the sweet black beans. I don't think she uses the black soy beans for the recipe but just substitute them.

Maangchi KongJang recipe.

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This is a great thread.

I'm looking for a recipe for a potato banchan. it is usually quartered or halved potatoes that are sweet and a little crispy. it seems like they have been fried and then boiled in syrup? does anyone have the recipe?

I think I know the food you are talking about. Normally it is a street food, or served as dessert. mom grandmother used to make this dish, and we used to sneak out and buy some from the vendors. Here is a website with the picture of the potatoes and a recipe. aeriskitchen.com sweet-potato-dessert (고구마-맛탕-goguma-mattang)

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Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc. 

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war. 

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew.  It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc.  It was a favorite dish growing up (:

Whenever I get a budae chigae craving at home I make a ramen with cheese, hot dogs, spam, bacon and kim chi. :D Pretty close to the same thing!

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