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torakris

kamaboko

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Well, you open up for questions... I think I will have a trip to Japan this winter. And I want to try 5-10 types of kamaboko. Which ones at the pictures should I pick out, and what are the names of them? Five is fine.

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Well, you open up for questions... I think I will have a trip to Japan this winter. And I want to try 5-10 types of kamaboko. Which ones at the pictures should I pick out, and what are the names of them? Five is fine.

Come to Japan just to take a look at kamaboko?? :blink::biggrin:

Since you asked,

1. Chikuwa

2. Sasa kamaboko (or sasakama for short)

3. Tsumire (usually made from sardines)

4. Satsuma age

5. Hanpen

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Just what I wanted! :smile:

And it's almost true. My contribution to the crazyness of the world.

Well, you open up for questions... I think I will have a trip to Japan this winter. And I want to try 5-10 types of kamaboko. Which ones at the pictures should I pick out, and what are the names of them? Five is fine.

Come to Japan just to take a look at kamaboko?? :blink::biggrin:

Since you asked,

1. Chikuwa

2. Sasa kamaboko (or sasakama for short)

3. Tsumire (usually made from sardines)

4. Satsuma age

5. Hanpen

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Very simple chikuwa dish:

gallery_16375_5_19555.jpg

Chikuwa with cheese in their holes.

One of my daughter's favorites.

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I have made little dive in the world of kamaboko now. Favourite; the top kanikama of Sugiyo. But there was some handmade hanpen, and... it's not possible to compare. Just one more little question: Some people use the world Kamaboko to frame this diversity. Some use the word Nerimono. It seems to me. What's the difference?

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I have made little dive in the world of kamaboko now. Favourite; the top kanikama of Sugiyo. But there was some handmade hanpen, and... it's not possible to compare. Just one more little question: Some people use the world Kamaboko to frame this diversity. Some use the word Nerimono. It seems to me. What's the difference?

As the word implies, nerimono (lit. something kneaded) is very broad in sense. It actually includes kamaboko, hanpen, satsuma age, chikuwa, etc., etc.

The same goes for almost all other words ending with -mono. The only exception I can think of at the moment is kimono (lit something worn), which in modern Japanese, means only those traditional Japanese garments.

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Great pictures of supermarket oden selection Hiroyuki. :rolleyes: But, I just can't warm up to chikuwa suffed with cheese. :blink: Do you eat this too?

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Great pictures of supermarket oden selection Hiroyuki.  :rolleyes:  But, I just can't warm up to chikuwa suffed with cheese.  :blink:  Do you eat this too?

Of course, I do. I like it too. Chikuwa with cucumber sticks in it is also good. :biggrin:

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I have made little dive in the world of kamaboko now. Favourite; the top kanikama of Sugiyo. But there was some handmade hanpen, and... it's not possible to compare. Just one more little question: Some people use the world Kamaboko to frame this diversity. Some use the word Nerimono. It seems to me. What's the difference?

As the word implies, nerimono (lit. something kneaded) is very broad in sense. It actually includes kamaboko, hanpen, satsuma age, chikuwa, etc., etc.

The same goes for almost all other words ending with -mono. The only exception I can think of at the moment is kimono (lit something worn), which in modern Japanese, means only those traditional Japanese garments.

Thank you! Interesting lecture! You're always vigilant. But is it wrong to use kamaboko as a common term that can include the other surimi based products like chikuwa, satsuma age and hanpen?

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I have made little dive in the world of kamaboko now. Favourite; the top kanikama of Sugiyo. But there was some handmade hanpen, and... it's not possible to compare. Just one more little question: Some people use the world Kamaboko to frame this diversity. Some use the word Nerimono. It seems to me. What's the difference?

As the word implies, nerimono (lit. something kneaded) is very broad in sense. It actually includes kamaboko, hanpen, satsuma age, chikuwa, etc., etc.

The same goes for almost all other words ending with -mono. The only exception I can think of at the moment is kimono (lit something worn), which in modern Japanese, means only those traditional Japanese garments.

Thank you! Interesting lecture! You're always vigilant. But is it wrong to use kamaboko as a common term that can include the other surimi based products like chikuwa, satsuma age and hanpen?

When I hear the word kamaboko, I usually associate it with that semicircular surimi product with or without a wooden board at the bottom.

But I found this passage from Wikipedia:

茹でたものははんぺんやつみれであり、揚げたものは薩摩揚げ(西日本では天ぷらとも呼ばれる)などとなる。これらも広義の蒲鉾の一つといえよう。

from here

Rough translation: Those boiled include hanpen and tsumire, and those fried include satsuma age (also called tempura in Western Japan). These can also be called kamaboko in its broad sense.

So, I guess, depending on whom you speak with, you can call them kamaboko.

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Thank you, Hiroyuki. And please forget this one: "I have a slight feeling that neither the Japanese or the world take kamaboko/surimi seriously,"

The feeling has gone.

I have made little dive in the world of kamaboko now. Favourite; the top kanikama of Sugiyo. But there was some handmade hanpen, and... it's not possible to compare. Just one more little question: Some people use the world Kamaboko to frame this diversity. Some use the word Nerimono. It seems to me. What's the difference?

As the word implies, nerimono (lit. something kneaded) is very broad in sense. It actually includes kamaboko, hanpen, satsuma age, chikuwa, etc., etc.

The same goes for almost all other words ending with -mono. The only exception I can think of at the moment is kimono (lit something worn), which in modern Japanese, means only those traditional Japanese garments.

Thank you! Interesting lecture! You're always vigilant. But is it wrong to use kamaboko as a common term that can include the other surimi based products like chikuwa, satsuma age and hanpen?

When I hear the word kamaboko, I usually associate it with that semicircular surimi product with or without a wooden board at the bottom.

But I found this passage from Wikipedia:

茹でたものははんぺんやつみれであり、揚げたものは薩摩揚げ(西日本では天ぷらとも呼ばれる)などとなる。これらも広義の蒲鉾の一つといえよう。

from here

Rough translation: Those boiled include hanpen and tsumire, and those fried include satsuma age (also called tempura in Western Japan). These can also be called kamaboko in its broad sense.

So, I guess, depending on whom you speak with, you can call them kamaboko.

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I wonder if there's anywhere in the UK to source these products apart from the Japan Centre?...

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I wonder if there's anywhere in the UK to source these products apart from the Japan Centre?...

Sorry, but I think that your question should be posted in the UK Forum. :sad::biggrin:

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I wonder if there's anywhere in the UK to source these products apart from the Japan Centre?...

Sorry, but I think that your question should be posted in the UK Forum. :sad::biggrin:

Erm... that's a better idea.

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Special Hina Matsuri (Girl's Day) kamaboko

gallery_6134_4148_65121.jpg


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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:smile:

(How the ... do they make these?)

Special Hina Matsuri (Girl's Day) kamaboko

gallery_6134_4148_65121.jpg

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Probably like taffy

Like kintaro ame. :raz:

Just in case you don't know about it, it's like this.

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I love kamaboko.  Sometimes I'll slice it thickly and bread it in panko instead of chicken strips.

:smile: Does that mean that you grew up with kamaboko? Or is this a new love?

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I'm not sure if the kamaboko thread now has been stretched close to the limit. But I have heard there is a new book about surim-kamaboko history written by Tsuji Masaji in Suisan Times(in Japanese of course). Does anyone know this or where it is possible to get it?

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Must apologise for a slightly off-topic post but the kamaboko with the images inside them reminded me of their traditional antecedents. I remember watching a show where a master confectioner demonstrated the art of preparing a special sweet for particular festival: on a sheet of mochi a red (bean paste?) filling was slapped down the center in one expert fluid motion, but with no recognizable form.

Then the whole was rolled into a cylinder. When cut into slices, the filling had arranged itself into the exact shape of a red flying crane in each slice, the symbol of that particular festival (Boy's Day??). I was stunned. To this day, the virtuosity of that master brings tears to my eyes. Call me a simpleton.

I do hope such treasured experts do not die out, totally replaced by somewhat absurd taffy machines that seem to lack the dignity and simplicity that always has distinguished the Japanese aesthetic.

gautam


Edited by v. gautam (log)

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Okay, I just bought some chikuwa. When I was in Japan, we were served some simmered kamaboko, including chikuwa, at breakfast, and it was delicious. I was hoping to make this at home but I have no idea what it was. Can anyone help?

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I'm not sure if the kamaboko thread now has been stretched close to the limit. But I have heard there is a new book about surim-kamaboko history written by Tsuji Masaji in Suisan Times(in Japanese of course). Does anyone know this or where it is possible to get it?

I think I missed this question of yours.

Why not send an inquiry to Suisan Times?

http://www.suisantimes.co.jp/english/headline.shtml

There is an inquiry email address at the bottom.

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Okay, I just bought some chikuwa. When I was in Japan, we were served some simmered kamaboko, including chikuwa, at breakfast, and it was delicious. I was hoping to make this at home but I have no idea what it was. Can anyone help?

What was the kamaboko simmered in? A simple broth, probably a dashi, soy sauce, and mirin mixture of a 15 to 20, 1, 1 ratio (same as oden broth)?

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