Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cho Dang Gol


Pan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Yesterday (Tuesday) night, Scamhi, a non-eGullet friend of hers, and I met up at this Korean eatery, on 55 W. 35 St., Tel. (212) 695-8222.

The meal was soothing and very pleasant, and the company was also thoroughly pleasant and gracious.

Cho Dang Gol specializes in artisanal tofu, which it makes in several varieties. I'm sure Scamhi could describe the dishes better than I (and I hope she does), but one that was particularly appealing was a near-puree of tofu (consistency slightly reminiscent of farmer cheese or ricotta) in broth - very soothing. We also had a stewy soup of another type of tofu in a spicy broth with scallions and such-like, a third soupy dish with yet another type of tofu and consistency, and a non-watery dish with some bean threads, rice sticks, sliced smoky pork, scallions, etc., and oven-baked tofu (yet another type of tofu). Some of the panchan dishes were interesting, too: Kimchee with tree ears and some other things in addition to cabbage, and some root vegetable we couldn't identify with red chili sauce and little bits of some kind of bacala'-like dried fish. Our appetizer, kimchi pancakes with sliced pork, was better than similar pancakes I've had at Kang Suh, very tasty. The room is elegant, too. I basically consider this a purveyor of special heimish Korean food that's made from scratch, and I'm certainly interested in going back.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you give more details on the pancakes? Were they non-soggy? I'm still searching for a non-soggy Korean pancake. Have you finally found one?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I don't know what your standards are for sogginess. I didn't find either those pancakes or the ones I had at Kang Suh to be notably soggy.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you pick a wedge of the pancake up by its edge, does it go all floppy or does it maintain integrity?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get the sense that's the standard for Korean pancakes. But wouldn't they taste better if they were fried to a crispier state, like Chinese scallion pancakes?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it's like how a properly browned french fry tastes better than a pale undercooked one. Much of the flavor comes from that what's-it-called reaction with the M.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maillard. What most of us confuse with caramelization.

I love Cho Dang Gol. In several visits, I doubt we've duplicated any panchan. And the food doesn't seem to be "adapted" to Western tastes (that's just conjecture, though). Which is great, because to us spicy = comfort.

But what I love most is the pleasure and pride the staff takes in the place and its food. We tend to order specials -- once it was raw oysters and boiled pork belly, to be wrapped in lettuce with chili paste and lots of raw garlic -- and the staff looked genuinely happy that we enjoyed "their" food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you give more details on the pancakes? Were they non-soggy? I'm still searching for a non-soggy Korean pancake. Have you finally found one?

FG,

Those Kimchi pan jun pancakes did have a big of sog(g).

The best pan jun not the least bit soggy is Han Bat convienently located right next door to Cho Dang Gol.

What distinguishes their pancake is that it is cooked and comes to the table in a stonewear dish.

Thanks Pan, for helping us get thru a copious quantity of Korean comfort food.

Edited by scamhi (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Where do you stand on the scallion pancake issue, Suzanne?

I try not to stand on them; it's too hard to scrape them out of the treads of my boots.

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you give more details on the pancakes? Were they non-soggy? I'm still searching for a non-soggy Korean pancake. Have you finally found one?

while nowhere near the bearer of authenticity, Dok Suni in the east village fries their pancake and it's wonderful.. their bulgogi isn't bad either.. for meat i'm still hooked on woo chon on 35th.. their panchan is amazing as well.. their pancake isn't crispy though..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Juuceman:

I love the Woo Chon branch on Kissena Blvd. in Flushing. Have you been there? If so, can you compare the two branches?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 years later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...