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Immersion Blenders: 2011-


Chris Amirault
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I've got two immersion blenders at home that I bought used: iirc, a Braun and a Krups. They're both getting kind of wheezy -- one actually screams now and then -- and I may soon be in need of a new one.

We have an old topic on immersion blenders, but surely the new decade brings us astonishing innovations in this kitchen staple. What's out there that's good? What sort of features -- varying speeds, different attachments -- are worth having? Any stinkers?

Chris Amirault

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I recently got the Bamix professional and it's pretty great. I really like it for ganache which is what I got it for. The whipping blade definitely emulsifies better than a traditional blade.

I tried an olive oil ganache (didn't like it for texture-kinda vaseliney) and the whipping blade worked really well bringing it together. A previous batch separated that I just whisked together.

I need to try out all the different blades though.

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I have gone through any number of immersion blenders. Bamix certainly makes a terrific product. However, the one that surpasses all others is a Robot Coupe MMP160VV. This has a variable speed from 2,000 to 12,500 rpm's. Best of all the shaft, blade and bell can be removed for deep cleaning. There is a whisk attachment that can be bought to add versatility. Not the cheapest, but it will outlast anything else you are considering.

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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I don't use it much except for blending soups. The first Kitchen Aid one I got several years ago was a bust when I used it in a ganache. I called KA and they sent a replacement right away and it's worked fine since.

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My Cuisinart is woefully underpowered. I'll buy the Robot Coupe when it dies -- besides torque it has two distinct advantages over all competitors -- ubiquitous and easy-to-replace parts.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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I got this KAas a gift a couple of years ago. I use it at least twice a week and I use all the pieces. The Bamix with all the different blades lookes awesome. But, the KA has done everything I've asked of it, so I'll stick with it for the time being. I'm not a baker or candy maker, so can't speak to those applications. I use it for minor chopping (I hate getting out the food processor), pureeing soups, whizzing sauces and salad dressing, whipping cream, etc., etc.

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My immersion blender's working find - mostly use it just for soups and sauces. It even has a little whisk attachement that ok for chantilly creme. BUT: the cord is a hassle. Are there any cordless out there that have good power. Bells, whistles, frills are acceptable.

What do you use yours for besides soups, sauce, ganache?

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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I've learned how good it is at eggs -- whites for drinks and scrambled, in particular.

OK, I'm being obtuse here I think, but how do you deploy it for scrambled eggs?? With the whisk attachment while they cook..? Before they cook? Though I wouldn't imagine a blender is necessary for that..hmm. (I don't have an immersion blender, but am in the market for one, so am a heady combination of inept and intrigued).

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I've learned how good it is at eggs -- whites for drinks and scrambled, in particular.

OK, I'm being obtuse here I think, but how do you deploy it for scrambled eggs?? With the whisk attachment while they cook..? Before they cook? Though I wouldn't imagine a blender is necessary for that..hmm. (I don't have an immersion blender, but am in the market for one, so am a heady combination of inept and intrigued).

You crack a bunch of eggs into a bowl and blast them for a few seconds with it on low. I don't have attachments so I'm talking about the basic blade that comes on models like these.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I received a basic Cuisinart model as a gift. It's pretty basic. Retails for $30. No attachments (though the blending shaft does detach). Only came with a blending beaker/measuring cup. So far, I've only used it to blend some soups and tomato (marinara) sauce. Works fine. Want to make mayo with it. The recipe in the booklet that comes with it basically calls for dumping everything into the beaker and giving it a spin. Sure sounds quick and easy. Normally, I make mayo by hand with a whisk and get fantastic results. I'll try it for ganache to make truffles one of these days, too.

Are the really spendy Bamix blenders really giving much better results?

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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  • 11 months later...

After making my last batch of soup I decided that an immersion blender may be useful. I've looked on line and found good reviews for the Cuisinart CB-76, but thus far have not been able to determine if it is cordless. Does anyone know? I doubt that it is, but I'd like to be sure. If it has a cord, how long is it? It would be great if it could be used while the soup is in the pot and on the stove. Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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To make the diameter small, most hand blenders use perminent magnets for the field coil, which makes it easy to use DC power.

However, a hand blender requires a lot of power to achieve high RPM, a battery for cordless would be very heavy.

The not-too-many cordless ones you find do not give you the power you need.

The Cuisinart CB-76 has a 200 watt motor. I don't see that being cordless.

dcarch

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If you have an immersion blender, and heavy whipping cream, you can make quick, simple, amazing sauces.

for example:

lemon-dill sauce

1 cup heavy cream

2 packets of dill (stems and all)

juice of 1 lemon

big pinch kosher salt

black pepper corns

1/2 clove garlic

1/4 clove shallot

blitz until cream stiffens...AMAZING on fish, or a chip dip.

faux bernaise sauce

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 packet of tarragon (discard the stems)

pinch of kosher salt

black pepper corns

1/2 clove shallot

2 teaspoons of champagne vinegar

blitz until cream stiffens - bernaise flavors in under 60 seconds!

flavored cream topping

any fruit, berry

heavy cream

sweetener of choice

squirt of lemon or lime (lime preferred)

dash of rum

blitz until cream thickens

top your fruit with this fruit flavored cream...

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I've had a Braun 172-B made in Mexico for many years now. It really does not do much and has a time limitation on operation (For Intermittent Use Only) because its just a small motor for household use.

I recently purchased this Robot Coupe Combi with stick mixer, emulsifier and wisks.

http://www.robotcoupeusa.com/products/product-info.php?id=85

It's commercial quality, really works great and is made to serviced. It's made in France. I am in the process of replacing all my countertop household electrics with commercial products not made in China. Everything was Kitchenaid Pro-Line, some of it not too bad and made in the USA but the China stuff is going.-Dick

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Yes, it does look interesting, and were I not on a fixed income and if I was earning what I did before retiring, I'd buy two <LOL>

I think I'm going to stick with something in the $50.00 or less range until I at least know what I want, both in terms of quality and features.

Thanks for the link.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I wish they would make a hand blender with higher RPM.

12,000 RPM is not the same as a regular blender's 22,000 RPM.

dcarch

Your comment on the rotational speed of the blades is something I'd barely considered. I didn't realize that a regular blender spun so fast - 22,000 RPM. How does the slower speed affect the results?

My daily blender is an older Waring professional bar blender, huge, heavy, and which can crush rocks. I wonder how fast that puppy spins.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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