Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

rebgold

Meltaways

Recommended Posts

I made your fondant recipe today. I think it turned out fine, but I have nothing to compare it to. I stirred once while it was cooling and it crystalized, but you didn't mention anything about not stirring so I assume that doesn't matter since you paddle it anyway?

I'm going to use it for the dipped mint patties and maybe lemon logs from Greweling's book tomorrow. I guess I'll be able to compare the finished product with his pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you enrobe mint meltaways in chocolate? I thinking that they may get too soft while dipping because of the coconut fat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup you can - over time there does tend to be some fat creepage - so enrobe in either milk chocolate or dark chocolate with some milk chocolate added in to make it more resistant to the fat bloom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much chocolate would you add the milk? Can you combine them when they're melted or temper them together?

My fondant turned out grainy. Apparently I shouldn't have touched it while it cooled. I made some enrobed mint patties with it anyway and added invertase hoping that it would smooth out the graininess when it started converting the sugar, but just a small batch in case it's garbage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will likely smooth out with the invertase. I'd probably add about 5% or so of milk chocolate to the dark. I usually temper them together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yup you can - over time there does tend to be some fat creepage - so enrobe in either milk chocolate or dark chocolate with some milk chocolate added in to make it more resistant to the fat bloom.

Any idea how milk chocolate mixed with the dark chocolate may inhibit fat creepage? Just curious.

I made the mint meltaways yesterday. Rather than tabling, I put them in the KitchenAid with the paddle for 20 minutes at speed 3. When I poured them into a frame, they were solidified in under an hour. Very smooth texture, definitely melt in your mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Milk chocolate contains a significant amount of butterfat and, because butterfat creates a strong eutectic with cocoa butter, the resultant product is much softer than plain chocolate. Milk chocolate rarely if ever undergoes Form VI bloom. The reason for this is the composition of butterfat contains a large range of TAG structures and molecular weights. This is due to the presence of significant amounts of fatty acids from C4 to C14. These serve to block the move from Form V to Form VI because, as they co-crystallise with cocoa butter TAG, the packing density of the crystals does not permit the thermodynamic change. The butterfat TAG also cause a change in the solid solution and thus a softer product. Both these effects reduce the incidence of bloom. This action of butterfat can (and is) harnessed to reduce the occurrence of bloom in plain chocolate. Butterfat can be added at a low level where softening of the chocolate is not significant but the effect on crystal form change is very significant."

Quoted from -

Fat Bloom

Eugene Hammond and Susan Gedney, United Biscuits (UK) Ltd, Group Technical, Lane End Road, Sands, High Wycombe, Bucks, HP12 4JX, UK

The way I've always pictured it is that dark chocolate in temper has all it's little chair shaped crystals lined up in military fashion allowing lines and planes that will allow other fats to creep through - when you add the more amorphous milk fat to it you fill in those lines between the crystalline planes and make it more impermeable to fat creeping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Kerry. It makes sense, especially your explanation! Next time I'll trying dipping the mint meltaways in dark chocolate spiked with 5% milk chocolate. I didn't have time to dip yesterday, so they got coated with powdered sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did enrobe mint meltaways in dark chocolate spiked with about 5% milk chocolate as Kerry suggested. There was no fat seepage at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make them with a mixture of milk and dark usually - but I have made them with just dark. In his description - he states they can be make with dark, milk or white.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone ever made the Greweling meltaways with dark chocolate?

I have made them several times with dark chocolate (70%). Also enrobed them in dark chocolate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the green tea meltaways from Greweling's at Home book. They're made with white chocolate. The texture is amazing, i.e., very creamy. I have made the mint meltaways before and what surprised me with these is how long that it took for them to crystalize to a point where they could be cut. Whereas the mint meltaways (dark chocolate) could be cut an hour after pouring the slab, it took about 6 hours before the green tea meltaways could be cut. I much prefer the texture of the green tea meltaways, though. The mint meltaways made with all dark chocolate were a little bit on the hard side for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other than the green tea meltaways, has anyone tried other meltaways using white chocolate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone - thinking of making the chocolate mint meltaways as christmas gifts... I see that they can be enrobed. What about using the meltaway as a filling for a molded chocolate? Has anyone tried this / any sense of whether this would work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone - thinking of making the chocolate mint meltaways as christmas gifts... I see that they can be enrobed. What about using the meltaway as a filling for a molded chocolate? Has anyone tried this / any sense of whether this would work?

It's a bit challenging because you want the meltaway to be thickening from the tabling you do before you pipe it in to the shells. It can be done but timing is everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm. I'm confused about how important the tabling really is... I made a batch tonight that I poured nearly hot into silicone molds, let set on the counter for a little while, and then put in the fridge. Less than an hour later they were set and the texture was divine...


Edited by Emily_R (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now I'm coming around to the tabling idea. While my meltaways were smooth as silk the first day, the second day they were just an eensy bit grainy. Since I don't have a marble slab, I may try cmflick's stand mixer approach...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now I'm coming around to the tabling idea. While my meltaways were smooth as silk the first day, the second day they were just an eensy bit grainy. Since I don't have a marble slab, I may try cmflick's stand mixer approach...

Oops - never got around to answering yesterday - indeed they look great day 1...

I keep the meltaway in a bowl over a bowl of cold water with a bit of ice - and keep stirring to prevent clumps until it starts to thicken up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies if this question has been answered elsewhere - is there a good substitution for coconut oil in meltaways? I wanted to make peanut butter meltaways for our family Christmas celebration, but I have a great niece who is extremely allergic to many things - including peanuts and all things coconut. I figure I will try SunButter to sub for the peanut butter, but wondered what I might sub for coconut oil. Ghee, maybe? Any advice would be appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, patris said:

My apologies if this question has been answered elsewhere - is there a good substitution for coconut oil in meltaways? I wanted to make peanut butter meltaways for our family Christmas celebration, but I have a great niece who is extremely allergic to many things - including peanuts and all things coconut. I figure I will try SunButter to sub for the peanut butter, but wondered what I might sub for coconut oil. Ghee, maybe? Any advice would be appreciated!

I suspect ghee or butter oil would work reasonably well - make a tiny test batch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be far more expensive, but, wouldn’t coca butter work as well?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I suspect ghee or butter oil would work reasonably well - make a tiny test batch.

 

That was my plan, but I figured if someone knew it absolutely wouldn't work I would spare myself the trip to Wegmans. Thank you, as always!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, RobertM said:

It would be far more expensive, but, wouldn’t coca butter work as well?  

 

My gut says that the texture wouldn't be so nice and soft. I'll try the ghee first and report back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By CCB
      I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
    • By anonymouse
      I've been working with the Boiron purée recipe tables (chocolate and PdF, ice cream) - some good successes.  However the document is very terse and I wondered whether anyone who is experienced with these formulae might clarify what the expected result is:
       
      - "Fruit ganaches" and "Fruit and caramel ganaches".  I think these are supposed to produce a ganache for cutting and enrobing, although when I tried it came out far too soft to be dipped???
       
      - "Ganaches to be combined with fruit pastes" - I think these are to be layered above PdF and enrobed - is that right?
       
      - "Chocolate molded sweets" - Are these intended to be served as is, ie moulded without a layer of couverture going into the mould first? However the instructions talk about pouring into a frame.
       
      - "Fruity delight" - looks like a fairly light dessert to go into a parfait glass.  Has anyone done these and how do they turn out?  How do they compare to the sabayon-based ones in the Boiron ice cream book?
       
      I'm going to start working through some of the ice creams next week and it will be interesting to see how these turn out.
       
      Thanks for any advice.
       
    • By danielle_j
      Hello and Happy Holidays!  I own an ice cream company and am looking for some information about equipment to use for scaling large batches of caramel.  Right now, we cook sugar over electric heat in an approx. 6 qt. stainless steel pot.  Once the caramel is at the correct color and temp (more on that below), we add our dairy to the hot mixture.  Obviously, this is not a viable option for producing large batches.
       
      I'm familiar with confectionary equipment from Savage, but don't have the budget for an automated piece.  Does anyone have experience with using just one of their copper or stainless steel kettles over a regular sized burner on electric heat? We've tried to use a single larger flat bottom pot sitting in the middle of all 4 burners on the stove to make a large batch of caramel, but it doesn't heat evenly.  I'm wondering if the rounded bottom of the kettle helps the entire pot cook evenly -- would we be able to set the kettle right on the burner; or, have to use it in a double boiler setting?
       
      Additionally, any recommendations for thermometers that work well with caramel would be welcomed.  We've used digital probes and candy thermometers, but on numerous occasions, the color and smell of the caramel that we associate with "doneness" is a dramatically different temperature for each batch.
       
      I came across a similar post on this topic from 2016, but aside from a recommendation for a large piece of equipment from Savage, there wasn't any other feedback.  Hoping to get some good input that will bridge the gap between extremely small batches and mass production.
    • By Paul Bacino
      I want to make some candied mint leaves for a dessert. Would you blanch them first to set the color ? Dry them, coat in egg wash. Coat with confectioners sugar or super
      fine sugar ? Dry in oven at a low temp or on the counter? How long will they last?
      I will be serving this with a lemon panna cotta with a blueberry or blk berry sauce.
      Paul
    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×