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Pierre Hermé's "Macarons"

108 posts in this topic

Has anyone had a look at his new book? Also does anyone know who to contact to find out if an English edition is in the pipeline?

Cheers

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I have the french edition. It is very pretty and a good book on macaron making, but much of the information is available elsewhere, on the web or in eGullets's excellent thread on macarons.

If you want to have recipes for all of PH's signature macarons or are interested in more exotic macarons like black truffle or foie gras then the book is essential.

My french is only "kitchen french" but I can follow the explanations without much problem.

Edit: Ah, there was that thread. Tried searching for in this forum.


Edited by TheSwede (log)

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I have the french edition. It is very pretty and a good book on macaron making, but much of the information is available elsewhere, on the web or in eGullets's excellent thread on macarons.

If you want to have recipes for all of PH's signature macarons or are interested in more exotic macarons like black truffle or foie gras then the book is essential.

My french is only "kitchen french" but I can follow the explanations without much problem.

Edit: Ah, there was that thread. Tried searching for in this forum.

Thanks for the info. I've gotten by with Spanish books so I suppose, with some help from online translators, I can get by with French.

Cheers

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I have the french edition. It is very pretty and a good book on macaron making, but much of the information is available elsewhere, on the web or in eGullets's excellent thread on macarons.

If you want to have recipes for all of PH's signature macarons or are interested in more exotic macarons like black truffle or foie gras then the book is essential.

My french is only "kitchen french" but I can follow the explanations without much problem.

Edit: Ah, there was that thread. Tried searching for in this forum.

Thanks for the info. I've gotten by with Spanish books so I suppose, with some help from online translators, I can get by with French.

Cheers

It's a fantastic book!

Well worth the $$ and the fuddling about with translation.

Classic!


2317/5000

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It's a fantastic book!

Well worth the $$ and the fuddling about with translation.

Classic!

Thanks for the input. Now I just need to see which is cheaper, ordering it from amazon.fr or amazon.ca.

Cheers

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I got mine from Amazon.fr back in September and shipping was 10.90 Euros. I'm pretty sure I had to pay GST at the post office, another 8-9 dollars, including the $5 service charge at the PO.

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The one thing I would add is if you're getting it from Amazon.fr is USE Chronopost or the high end delivery system.

I had an *%ing nightmare when I ordered PH10 and tried to save 15 euro (lol!) only to wait for two, TWO months and endless emails and such to see what in the hell happened.

I ordered "Macaron" and many others express and it was a beautiful story.

PS: Just to add 2 cents to the original question, I doubt we'll be seeing an English version anytime soon, if ever.

If a book like PH10 has been published in all of the major languages except English (wish someone would explain why) not to mention the general lack of knowledge about the 'Mac here in the US, the macaron needs an explosion of publicity like cupcakes did.

Paulette macarons ln Los Angeles, a joint venture between her and Christophe Michalak, winner of the 2005 Coupe du Monde de la Pâtisserie, a former protege of PH himself and author of a really delightful cook book called "C'est du gateau!" which covers the 'mac with some great recipes and how to illustrations. Michalak writes a great pastry blog as well, Passion Gourmande

Paulette is opening a store in San Francisco next so maybe the wave is starting to roll!


Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

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Thanks a ton for the added info. Just a quick question. Is there a list of the macaron recipes somewhere. I'm just interested to see if he has included some basics like a strawberry (bonus if it is strawberry and rose), cassis (blackberry) and perhaps a nice vanilla bean one. Both amazon.fr and amazon.ca do not have the "look inside" option for this book. Thanks again

The one thing I would add is if you're getting it from Amazon.fr is USE Chronopost or the high end delivery system.

I had an *%ing nightmare when I ordered PH10 and tried to save 15 euro (lol!) only to wait for two, TWO months and endless emails and such to see what in the hell happened.

I ordered "Macaron" and many others express and it was a beautiful story.

PS: Just to add 2 cents to the original question, I doubt we'll be seeing an English version anytime soon, if ever.

If a book like PH10 has been published in all of the major languages except English (wish someone would explain why) not to mention the general lack of knowledge about the 'Mac here in the US, the macaron needs an explosion of publicity like cupcakes did.

Paulette macarons ln Los Angeles, a joint venture between her and Christophe Michalak, winner of the 2005 Coupe du Monde de la Pâtisserie, a former protege of PH himself and author of a really delightful cook book called "C'est du gateau!" which covers the 'mac with some great recipes and how to illustrations. Michalak writes a great pastry blog as well, Passion Gourmande

Paulette is opening a store in San Francisco next so maybe the wave is starting to roll!

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Not really but in PH's book at least, the basic recipe for fruit flavors could lead you pretty right.

His big vaniila flavor "Infinement Vanille" is there


2317/5000

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I just received this book and wanted to chime in to say It's Beautiful! I love the close ups of the macarons and it appears to have recipes for all the Herme classics. I ordered it from Amazon Canada and paid US$47 with shipping.

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I just received this book and wanted to chime in to say It's Beautiful! I love the close ups of the macarons and it appears to have recipes for all the Herme classics. I ordered it from Amazon Canada and paid US$47 with shipping.

Nice one!

Also wanted to tell scout 21 that cassis is in there as well as a strawberry and a couple of vanilla's.


2317/5000

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Here you guys go, a list of the recipes in the book. Its an awesome book and though the recipes are different from his other books, they all still work the same as long as you get the Macaronage right.

Different flavours seperated by a comma, and flavour combinations either in brackets or with a + sign between flavours. Hope this provides enough temptation for you all to buy it! Have tried 3 recipes and they all taste good, better than anything you can buy here in London anyway (And Singapore too), provided the ingredients used are great!

Classics:

bitter chocolate, rose, praline, blackcurrant (Cassis), caramel, pistachio, coffee, raspberry, lemon, glazed chestnuts

Fetishes:

Carrement (extra bitter chocolate, nibs and salt), Celeste (Strawberry, passionfruit and rhubarb), Eden (Peach, Apricot and Saffron), Ispahan (Rose, Lychee and Raspberry), Infiniment Vanille (Mexican, madagascan and tahitian vanilla), Mogador (Passionfruit, milk choc), Montebello (Pistachio, Raspberry), Sarah (Chestnut, matcha), Plenitude (Choc and caramel), Mosic (Pistachio, griottines, ceylan cinnamon), Satine (Passionfruit, orange and cream cheese).

Signatures:

Olive oil + vanilla, grapefruit+orange+campari, violet+blackcurrant, arabella (Milk choc+ginger+passionfruit+banana+hazelnuts), mint, arabesque (Apricot +pistachio), lime + basil, earl grey+milk choc, yuzu+choc, avocat+banana, milk chocolate+caramel+rice krispies, mint+raspberry, chuao choc+blackberry), vanilla+strawberry, coffee+orange confit, lemon+hazelnut praline+feuilletine), rosehip+chestnut, salted caramel+apples, mlk chocolate + coconut, raspberry+pink peppercorns+parmesan, milk chocolate+hazelnuts

Special recipes for clients:

jasmine, avocat+lemon, carrot+orange, ketchup, raspberry+esplette pepper, madnarin orange+baies rose, orange flower water+ginger+rose, tea from Maison des Trois Thes

Exceptions:

25 yr Balsamico, white truffle+piedmont hazelnuts, foie gras+choc, Osetra caviar+l'eau de noix (Walnut eau de vie?), rosehip+figs+foie gras, black truffle, wasabi+grapefruit

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Very excited - just ordered my copy! Can't read a word of French, but I'm sure I'll get by somehow.

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I've been playing around with this wonderful book for a while now and was planning on making the Ispahan macarons but I noticed a few other recipes and blogs that mention the use of gellan instead of gelatine for making the raspberry cubes.

Ispahan Macaroon : Star Chefs adaptation

Does anyone have some experience as to the texture differences between gelatin and gellan cubes?

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The Isaphan is made (the gel) with gellan now but I've seen it used for the Litchi cubes not the raspberry.

Here is a recipe for the Isaphan cake with the litchi gel with gellen.

As for the 'Mac recipe, I don't think there is a noticable difference.

I find it more...natural, for lack of a better word.

If you get the gellen, make sure you get the correct acyl


2317/5000

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Sorry if I'm just having a block head moment, but do you find the gellan or the gelatine more natural?

Thanks for the link and info

Cheers!

The Isaphan is made (the gel) with gellan now but I've seen it used for the Litchi cubes not the raspberry.

Here is a recipe for the Isaphan cake with the litchi gel with gellen.

As for the 'Mac recipe, I don't think there is a noticable difference.

I find it more...natural, for lack of a better word.

If you get the gellen, make sure you get the correct acyl

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When I have used gellan I found it more natural, in a way, not as tight,

For me any of these products ( locust bean gum, agar, etc.) all kind of screw with your minds concept of what it should be like.

I can't explain it much better w/o starting a new topic.

My point before was make it like the cookbook :biggrin:


2317/5000

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Many thanks for the help. The only gellan product I can find on PCB France's website is the textura gellan. This is the high acyl gellan, correct?

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It appears so.

Why not try these folks?

Get the LL Kelcogel and the other for less then the texturas?

You'll have these around forever!!!


2317/5000

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anyone get any snaps of their creations?


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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anyone get any snaps of their creations?

I did these before I got the book, but they are made with the Hermé method:

gallery_56770_5388_169481.jpg

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v.impressive!


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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It seems that Macaron is already out of print -- Amazon.fr is only listing secondary sellers at very high prices.

We reviewed it on The Gastronomer's Bookshelf a few weeks back. There's a lot of repetition in the book, but it's clear and helpful.


-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."

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