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blue_dolphin

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Everything posted by blue_dolphin

  1. Sounds like you have lots of great options for fresh pasta, so no need to get into this again but I give you an A+ for what you accomplished in one day. Setting up and getting the hang of rolling pasta with one of those manual crank machines for the first time isn't easy. Just doing that with a small piece of dough is plenty for a day 1 lesson. Cut them with a knife, toss into the pot of water and enjoy a little bowl of noodles with butter & cheese for extra credit. You went way above and beyond on your first day!
  2. Don't sweat this too much! You've put a lot on your plate. Sounds like you are not only making fresh pasta but also making something with a filling AND a sauce. Is it lasagne? ravioli? I think either of them are projects all on their own. You can still put everything back into the fridge and pick up later. You've gotten a lot of good advice her from people with a lot more fresh pasta experience than I have but my very beginner recommendation is to make a basic cut noodle with a very simple sauce for your first run. You can make a full 1 lb batch of dough, but just roll and cut what you need for a meal and put the rest back into the fridge. No need to work out details on drying, freezing, etc. for the first time. Just roll, cut, drop them into the water and enjoy a nice meal. If you are up for more and ready to go right into fillings, etc. then don't let me discourage you - I'm impressed and pulling for you!
  3. blue_dolphin

    Lunch 2020

    Tuna salad on pita
  4. Good luck with the coffee roasting! I used the popcorn popper for quite a while and it was a good learning opportunity. I found the Sweet Maria videos very helpful. Do take notes on your batches. Two downsides from my perspective. First, it's LOUD but you can't just turn it on, set a timer and walk away. I found it helpful to stir the beans around a bit in the beginning to help ensure an even roast and you want to listen for the cracking sounds so you need to stay pretty close to the noisy thing. If you've got some noise-cancelling headphones, try them. My Bose over-the-ear headphones that I use for plane travel very much helped to muffle the popper noice but let me hear the cracking sounds. Maybe mine was unusually loud or I am unusually sensitive to noises, but I found that aspect quite unpleasant. The second issue was the relatively small volume of beans that can be roasted at a time in a popper. Not a problem just for myself but when I had coffee-guzzling guests, I was needing to roast more beans almost every day or sit there for a long time doing multiple small batches. A few stretches of caffeine addicted houseguests led me to go back to buying coffee. I should reconsider roasting the beans again I'm unlikely to be hosting crowds anytime soon!
  5. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    I've never been one to argue with a good idea especially since a packet of balsamic roasted onions with sage was handy in the freezer. Not everything in my freezer is "handy" but these had fallen out and landed on my toe yesterday when I was looking for something else so I knew right where they were 🙃
  6. blue_dolphin

    Lunch 2020

    When I pulled out Mark Vetri's Mastering Pasta yesterday, I spied a recipe for Farfalle with Chorizo and Favas. I had favas in the freezer and was convinced there was a small piece of Spanish chorizo in the fridge so I embarked on making the farfalle this morning using the Whole Egg, Bread Flour and Stone-Ground Wheat Dough from his book. The chorizo went missing so I settled on some 'nduja instead. Vetri calls for Pantaleo, a hard, aged goat cheese from Sardinia. I subbed Cabrillo, a Spanish-style goat & cow cheese from Stepladder Creamery on the California central coast. Next time, I'll roll dough a little thinner but it was a good learning experience - I used pinking shears to cut the dough 🤣 and a satisfactory lunch with a glass of syrah.
  7. In American Sfoglino, Evan Funke recommends blanching filled pasta for future use. He says that if you refrigerate them directly after making, moisture from the filling can sweat through the pasta, resulting in a tacky dough but that blanching cooks the surface protein of the pasta and seals the moisture inside. I imagine that's why Teo recommends putting them directly into the freezer and I'd suspect that a blast chiller would be even better. Funke says to just boil them until they float, transfer to a towel-lined surface and turn them every 5 min or so, ideally with a fan blowing on them, until they are completely dry (20 - 40 min) before refrigerating for up to 10 days or freezing for up to 3 months. I have not tested multiple methods but I've done this a couple of times and it's worked nicely.
  8. This 2019 paper, Water-indexed benefits and impacts of California almonds, doesn't specifically address the 1 gal/almond claim, rather they use a measure called "water footprint" but they use the same metric across a large range of California crops to compare water usage vs nutritional value vs commercial value and also compared the water usage of almonds grown in different areas of the state. As to how those water usage values were derived, they cite a 2011 paper, The green, blue and grey water footprint of crops and derived crop products, which goes into much detail on the mathematical formulas used to calculate the water footprint values they present in the voluminous tables in the paper. Kinda interesting. Obviously, I don't have enough to do 🙄
  9. Thanks to this thread, I pulled out my KitchenAid pasta roller and made fettuccine with the Whole Egg, Bread Flour and Stone Ground Wheat Dough from Marc Vetri's Mastering Pasta. Used some here in Marcella Hazan's Fettuccine col Sugo di Tonno con Aglio e Panna, a recipe from Marcella's Italian Kitchen that I was reminded of by @Margaret Pilgrim's recent post in the dinner topic. Recipe available online here: Food52. It's a super easy, one pot/one bowl pasta and an excellent option if you want to try fresh pasta as a weeknight meal. Mix up the dough, then pull together the simple sauce and maybe a salad while the dough rests. Boil the water while you run the pasta through the rollers, drop it right into to cook, toss and serve. Last time I made this (see here), I found the sauce a bit rich, so this time, I tossed some broccoli and red bell pepper into the salted water along with the pasta. Delicious with or without the added vegetables.
  10. Yes, that's right. I like this method for making quick "micro stock" in the Instant Pot from vegetable trimmings. Of course, the rest of your asparagus is probably long gone by now so it may be no help.
  11. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    A very sturdy breakfast here. Two of the Cheese & Spicy Pepper Potato Balls I ordered from Porto's bakery "bake at home" service and a 6.5 minute egg At first, I thought I might be able to balance a poached egg atop those balls but I could see that wasn't going to work so I went with the soft boiled.
  12. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    Those mushrooms of @Anna N's have been taunting me since she posted them on Saturday. Sadly, no mushrooms in the house. Happily, I remembered that I'd roasted up the last round with some rosemary and garlic in preparation for something that was never made. Even more happily, they were in that super cold region of my fridge and aside from being almost frozen, seemed OK. I reheated them in a little oil and a splash of sherry, finished with a splash or two of whipping cream and piled them on toast I think I could eat another plate of this!
  13. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    What's the cheat? Looks awfully good to me!
  14. Nice! I see their little country ham biscuit slices are 30% off. Maybe not the lowest price per ounce for bulk ham but they are so very handy to have on hand, either for a breakfast sandwich or when a recipe calls for a small amount of diced ham.
  15. Me, too. Currently 4 on the dining table, 5 on the kitchen island and 4 on the coffee table. That's fairly typical.
  16. A while back, I posted a photo of the cover I cut from a sheet of mylar covered styrofoam insulation. The one I posted is a small cooler, I also have a larger one if needed and made the same sort of lid for it. I already had these items on hand. I don't have a Joule, but it should work fine.
  17. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    Grilled cheese sandwich on homemade bread with Manchego cheese, Serrano ham and quince paste
  18. blue_dolphin

    Dinner 2020

    Once again, taking guidance from @Anna N, I took my slice of leftover pizza (Fava, ricotta & lemon from Cool Beans if anyone is interested) out back for a change of scenery before I chowed down. We took in the orange tree And the echium Apologies for my failure to remove the original mint leaves and replace them with perky, fresh ones.
  19. I thought that video was pretty good. For me, the most valuable take away was to plan ahead and set up your workspace before starting this stuff. Duh, I know. I have good working knowledge of aseptic technique but my "work brain" was apparently left behind in the lab and I kept messing up my grocery handling when I was more or less winging it in my kitchen instead of sitting at a laminar flow hood! After watching that the other day, I did much better.
  20. blue_dolphin

    Dinner 2020

    No cook pasta sounds crunchy 🙃
  21. blue_dolphin

    Lunch 2020

    Egg salad sandwich again
  22. Yes, I bought one during their Kickstarter campaign for around $100. It arrived during a long stretch of very hot weather when I couldn't think of cranking up the oven so I put it out in the garage and promptly forgot all about it until I saw your comment pop up the other day. Thanks, os much for mentioning it, there is no telling how long it would have languished out there. No Marie Kondo-ing has ever happened in my garage! Having been reminded, I figured I should at least try it before responding so I've done that. I'll need to play around with it a bit but in general, it works as the promoters claimed and I like it. Super easy to take the bread out of the pan and peel off the silicone liner. A nicely shaped loaf with excellent crust all the way around. The current price of the LoafNest on Amazon is $199, a significantly larger investment. I re-read this thread there was a lot of concern about the offset handles. They might look a bit odd, but in practice, they work just fine. When I pick it up wearing oven gloves and cup my hands around the base unit, my thumbs naturally stabilize the handles of the lid. It's not a stretch to do so. All the recipes in the manufacturer booklet use 500g flour which makes a loaf size that is a good size for me. When I drop a loaf of this size into a dutch oven, it would always spread into a flatter loaf. These slices are good for smallish sandwiches. Again, good for me. All the recipes in the booklet are super simple: Mix, rise, transfer to the pre-heated pot and bake. No kneading, no turns and folds, no shaping at all. Unless your yeast is dead, they're probably pretty foolproof. They strongly recommend following one of their recipes for the first bake and I did, pretty much. I used 50% bread flour and 50% spelt flour and used leftover whey from some homemade "ricotta" as the liquid. Here is my loaf: The loaf is about 8.5 inches long, 5.25 inches wide and it rose to a little over 4 inches tall. And the crumb: The interior isn't doughy at all but still moister than I would like. Next time, I'll remove the lid for the last 15 min or so of the bake as I usually do with a dutch oven and make sure to temp the loaf before I remove it, something I forgot to do here. This will be fine for toast and sandwiches but I'd like to play around with other recipes to get more gluten development and probably use a second rise. To easily transfer shaped dough into the liner, a small, oval proofing basket would be handy. I'm going to try and rig something up and if that doesn't work, I'll break down and buy one. I'm taking my time with experimenting because of challenge of getting bread flour around here but once that's solved, I look forward to playing around some more.
  23. Yes, very similar here in Ventura County. All the farmers markets are still open. No sampling. No displaying cut fruit. No feeling up all the produce - you touch it, you buy it! You have to queue up (well separated) at a lot of the stands. The market staff are quite committed to supporting the farmers and keeping the markets open as "essential." They've set up a lot of extra hand-washing stations, separated the stands and go around 'policing' the guidelines. I do worry about some of the farmers who are in their 70s as it's a lot of exposure to people and cash handling, even taking precautions as they do.
  24. blue_dolphin

    Breakfast 2020!

    @Kim Shook, that looks like bacon & egg perfection to me! Greek yogurt, farmers market strawberries, a cream scone and black coffee
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