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ChefCrash

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  1. Hi Restorer This photo is of fried chicken wings. Rinsed with water and shaken in seasoned flour. Deep fried in fresh Crisco shortening, in three batches, 10 wings at a time, same temperature for 9 minutes. As you can see, the color is uniform across all. This photo is of another session where I wanted to try buttermilk. Again, I started with fresh Crisco. The batch on the right was done the same as the ones above (rinsed in water and shaken in flour). The batch in the center was dipped in buttermilk then shaken in flour. Not only did they turn too dark fast, the shortening darkened in color as well. Although the last batch on the left was not dipped in buttermilk, it came out darker too but not as dark as the batch dipped in buttermilk. Needless to say, the shortening was shot and was thrown out. You may want to consider rinsing the buttermilk off one or two of your chicken pieces before you dredge in flour and fry them, and see if you get the same results.
  2. I'd add about 2T water, mix, cover with cellophane and microwave.
  3. I'm sure you've had a 'Big Mac' that had been sitting under the lights. What's the difference? Make your sandwich the way you want.
  4. I don't see why it wouldn't work. It's a bit pricey, I've seen units like that for about $50. If you decide that sous vide is not your bag of chips, the unit will come handy for many thing: Controlling a space heater in the winter. Controlling a cooling or ventilation fan in the summer. Controlling temperature of a dedicated refrigerator for Lagering home brew or aging meats. Controlling temperature in an electric smoker. On the other hand, for about $45 and a cheap hot plate you could have PID control using this.
  5. Well, your heating element is shot and needs to be changed. This happens when the insulation between the inner resistance coil and the outer casing of the heating element disintegrates allowing the two to touch. That shorts the circuit causing arcing (much like welding). You'l need to gently file the burr off the pan with a metal file. Try not to file the pan itself.
  6. We recently changed to a stainless topped gas range with continuous grates. With the old electric it was easy to wipe off splatter as we cooked. After cooking the range top needed minimal cleaning. Now however, we have a new ritual of removing the heavy grates to wipe the range top clean after every meal. Continuous grates = continuous cleaning. Do you fined yourself doing the same thing? We’re enjoying your blog BTW.
  7. ChefCrash

    Fish & Chip

    Cod is what I like to use. For the batter: 1/4 cup corn startch 3/4 cup self rising flour light beer Mix flour and corn startch and whisk in enough beer to get the consistency of a runny pankace batter, and refrigerate. Cut the Cod into sticks or flat chunks. Preheat corn oil to 375 F, using tongs, dunk the fish into the cold batter and place in the oil. Try not to over crowd the fish in the oil (this depends on the size of your fryer). Fry until golden brown and crisp.
  8. Thanks Foodman, I think I read somewhere that you grew up in Tripoli. Did Akub grow in the mountains that far north in Lebanon? Miriam, I googled 'Akoob' and found one reference linking Akub to 'Gundelia tournefortii' here. Hope it helps.
  9. Hi Miriam, The Akub in your photo are the tender hearts with the tougher stems and thorns removed. The bundles in my photo are how they look like right out of the ground. Your preparation of Akub (steamed and sauteed in olive oil), is the traditional one. Mnazzali't Akub: 1 C canned chick peas drained 2 lb Akub, 1 inch chop 1 C onions diced 3/4 C olive oil water salt and pepper Saute 1 cup onion in 3/4 cup olive oil (I know it sounds like a lot) til lightly blond. Add Akub,season and saute ~ 10 minute. Add water to barely cover everything and simmer covered until the Akub is tender. Add chick peas and season to taste and simmer further. The result should not be soupy, but more like a stew. If you prefer to used dried chick peas, they must be soaked overnight and must be added to the skillet in the beginning. The Alosh in the photo, we refer to as 3ilt or wild hinbeh. Your preparation (cooked leaves in warm water very quickly, then sauteed them in olive oil with some garlic and a squeeze of lemon.) is our preferred way as well. Peasant food at its best.
  10. Two sweet old ladies from a near by village, selling Akub door to door in Deirmimas Lebanon. Close up. Mnazzali, is another dish you can make with the tough parts of Akub.
  11. I haven't had this dish in over thirty years. It's traditionally made with Lamb tripe and is not readily available here in the States. This week however, we found some frozen. My grand mother used to stuff the tripe with a rice mixture (Hashweh), and boil them with Lamb's feet. We couldn't find any of those so we used pigs' feet. Filling: 2 c rice 1 c chic peas soaked overnight 1 lb minced lamb shoulder meat 2 small onions roughly chopped 1 stick butter 1 tsp Lebanese 7 spice 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp black pepper 1 T salt For the boil: 4 pigs' feet reserved bones from Lamb shoulder one onion cut in half 5 cloves 10 whole pepper corns 2 bay leaves 3 sticks of cinnamon salt water to cover. The tripe was very clean but soaking it in some vinegar and water for a few minutes, got rid of all odors of Zankha. This tripe resembled two or three braziers with D sized cups, connected together. It was easy to divide the individual "cups" and sew each to form pouches. They're sewn inside out leaving an opening for the stuffing. The stuffing before mixing. Fill the pouches 2/3 full to allow for expansion and sew them shut. Poke all the pouches with a fork to allow broth to penetrate the inside. Line the bottom of a 20Qt pot with the bones and feet. Top with the pouches and cover with water. Bring to a boil, skim off the scum then add the rest of the ingredients. Cover and simmer for ~ 3 hours or until the pouches are fork tender. Everything turned out delicious. Just the way I remember it. The broth was served on the side as well as garlic/lemon/oil sauce to dip the meats in. Next time I'd use black string to sew the pouches. Much easier to find and pull out before eating.
  12. I haven't had this dish in over thirty years. It's traditionally made with Lamb tripe and is not readily available here in the States. This week however, we found some frozen. My grand mother used to stuff the tripe with a rice mixture (Hashweh), and boil them with Lamb's feet. We couldn't find any of those so we used pigs' feet. Filling: 2 c rice 1 c chic peas soaked overnight 1 lb minced lamb shoulder meat 2 small onions roughly chopped 1 stick butter 1 tsp Lebanese 7 spice 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp black pepper 1 T salt For the boil: 4 pigs' feet reserved bones from Lamb shoulder one onion cut in half 5 cloves 10 whole pepper corns 2 bay leaves 3 sticks of cinnamon salt water to cover. The tripe was very clean but soaking it in some vinegar and water for a few minutes, got rid of all odors of Zankha. This tripe resembled two or three braziers with D sized cups, connected together. It was easy to divide the individual "cups" and sew each to form pouches. They're sewn inside out leaving an opening for the stuffing. The stuffing before mixing. Fill the pouches 2/3 full to allow for expansion and sew them shut. Poke all the pouches with a fork to allow broth to penetrate the inside. Line the bottom of a 20Qt pot with the bones and feet. Top with the pouches and cover with water. Bring to a boil, skim off the scum then add the rest of the ingredients. Cover and simmer for ~ 3 hours or until the pouches are fork tender. Everything turned out delicious. Just the way I remember it. The broth was served on the side as well as garlic/lemon/oil sauce to dip the meats in. Next time I'd use black string to sew the pouches. Much easier to find and pull out before eating.
  13. Great blog DG. What a beautiful country. Just so you know, our president has invented a new language too.
  14. Tili3 sinno w'firhat immo, w'bayyo khaf 3al khibzaat. or Kil "sin" w'into bkhair? Looks great Congratulations Foodman.
  15. Yes Kerry, four cloves of garlic as well as a T of salt is excessive. Tarator is the equivalent of Tartar sauce in the U.S., in that it is served with most fried fish dishes in Lebanon, as well as Falafel and Shawerma sandwiches. In a small bowl add 1 clove of garlic, a dash of salt and mash with a wooden pestle. Add ~ 1/2 C Tahini, juice of 1/2 a lemon and stir. You will feel the mixture start to seize and acquire a granular texture, that is normal but do not add more lemon juice. Add water a little at a time until the mixture is smooth and you reach the desired consistency. Dash salt to taste.
  16. Thanks Milagai agalarneau, yes they're Turnips and get their color from beets. Start with 12% solution (120g salt per 1 liter of water). To that, add 1/3 liter white vinegar and bring to a boil just to sterilize. Pack Turnips in jars, along with 2 slices of raw beets and 1 or 2 serrano peppers. Fill with hot brine and wait a few days.
  17. To us, this is known as work food. That is, we only have it at work. I have never seen it being made. My wife, or one of the sisters in law or all of them would make Falafel, and would deliver them in a deconstructed state to where, we the brothers, work. When I saw this Cook Off, I knew we had something to contribute, our Falafel are as good as any served on the streets of Beirut. 2 C Hummus 1 C Split or cracked Fava beans 6 cloves garlic 1/2 C parsley 1 1/2 tsp cumin 1 1/2 tsp coriander seed ground 1 T salt 1/2 tsp cayenne 4 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda water to correct consistency while mixing. Served with Tarator
  18. ChefCrash

    Dried Fava Beans

    Hathor, As Kerry explained above, you want a little bit of seasoning on each Fava bean. Tossing everything in a bowl wouldn't be the same. Kerry, I'm glad you enjoyed them. I didn't mention Foul Mudammas because it's usually made with the smaller Fava beans since their skins are softer. They're used whole, skins and all. Foul mudammas is mostly served for breakfast in Lebanon. The restaurants that serve it usually also serve Hummus B'Tahini as well. Soak the beans overnight. Next morning, change the water, add salt and boil. This time you want them to get relatively mushy. Drain and reserve some of the liquid. In a bowl, sprinkle a clove of garlic with a little salt (to keep it from flying around) and mash it with a wooden pestle. Add about two cups of beans and mash them with the pestle, use the reserved liquid to correct the consistency. Add juice of half a lemon, 1/2 tsp dried mint, 1T fresh parsley and mix. Add salt to taste. Drizzle a generous amount of new olive oil on top, and enjoy with pita bread, olives, green onions, radishes, pickled turnips and the like.
  19. That would surely resolve Zeno's dichotomy paradox, but what Faby proposes opens a whole new can of worms. :
  20. ChefCrash

    Dried Fava Beans

    The larger Fava beans are preferred for this Lebanese mazza dish. Soak overnight, and boil til tender but not mushy. Drain, place on a shallow dish in thin layer. Squeeze lemon juice and sprinkle with salt and lots of Cumin. These are often served warm or at room temperature with drinks. Use your fingers to bring them to your mouth, bite the tip off, pinch the bean into mouth and discard the skin.
  21. Here's another use for a wok.
  22. Ok, I'm getting Korea and some sort of savory pie - my guess is the Domestic Goddess. ← Yes, I recognize this counter top from someone's fried chicken pictorial.
  23. Smithy, You don't mention oven temperature and cooking time. My roaster has a vent in the lid (as does an oven), which I leave open. I view the roaster as an oven within an oven, and merely acts as a buffer. As the oven cycles on and off, the roaster maintains constant temperature. I'll entertain any debate as to why it's steaming vs roasting any day. I've cooked my Turkeys in a covered roaster for the last 15 years. Eighteen to twenty pounds @400F for about 3.5 hours. This one from last Thanksgiving: Crisp skin and moist breast.
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