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docsconz

Welcome to an eG Conversation with Jose Andres

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Jose Andres</div>

The eGullet Society for Culinary Arts and Letters is honored to have one of the premiere chefs in the United States and the world, Jose Ramon Andres, join us for the next few days for an eG Spotlight Conversation. The multi-talented and energetic Chef Andres is the executive Chef for a number of leading Washington D.C. area restaurants, author of the cook book Tapas, television host and producer, eGullet Society member and a frequent participant of influential culinary conferences.

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<a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1400053595/egulletcom-20" target="_blank"> <img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1160963336/gallery_6393_3739_5256.jpg" hspace="16"></a><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/8408063146/egulletcom-20" target="_blank"> <img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1160963336/gallery_6393_3739_9982.jpg" hspace="16"></a></div>

For more information on the career of Jose Andres, please see About Jose Andres.

Please join Rochelle Reid-Myers (Malawry), Pedro Espinosa (Pedro), Ron Kaplan (Ronnie_Suburban), Rogelio Enriquez (Rogelio) and myself in welcoming eGullet member Jose Andres as he fields questions and discusses his career, restaurants, book, tv show and Spanish food both in the U.S. and Spain!

To post a question, click "New Topic" at the top of this forum. Each question will be its own topic. Once a question has been posted, we ask that the membership refrain from any additional posts or commentary until Jose has had the opportunity to respond to the post directly. Once Jose's response is up, the topic is open for in depth discussion by all members, and we warmly encourage followup conversation. Please note that this eG Conversation may be moderated, and your question may not appear as soon as you post it. Also, we may edit new topic titles for clarity.

Welcome, Jose and let’s begin this eG Spotlight Conversation!


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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