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SobaAddict70

Boeuf Bourguignon

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I asked about wine in making this on an earlier thread, and a few people suggested Gallo Hearty Burgundy. I will try that next time.

I've tried the Les Halles version, haven't tried TKeller's yet, but my favorite version, which I preferred over Les Halles, is from the New Basics Cookbook,

It's a rich hearty version, with loads of wine.

It calls for 3 cups red wine, 3 lbs cubed chuck, and 3 cups beef broth, tomato paste, carrots, onions, mushrooms, bacon lardons, and rosemary.

Easy, fast, and really flavorful.

:smile: Pam

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Chefzadi, you're a man after my own heart.

There's too much verbiage over a simple dish like beef stew, ok, boeuf bourgignon then. :biggrin: In another thread I used the word pragmatism in trying to get posters to free themselves from the strict constraints of "classical" (perceived or otherwise) recipes, insisting on the right brand of cooking wine, the exact brand of sauce, the precise ratio of ingredients, etc. ad infinitum. Except for my restaurant days, I can never replicate a dish to taste precisely, exactly each and every time. But then, our taste buds, among other variables, don't react exactly the same way each and every hour of any day. I am of the belief that you make do with what is at hand and if you don't have the goods, then improvise. And, if you do improvise, I will not be calling your efforts dishonest. :blink:


Edited by Ben Hong (log)

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I haven't made this recipe but a friend has and she said it was incredible:

From FoodNetwork's "Tyler's Ultimate":

"Tyler Florence's Boeuf Bourguignon"


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I'm just starting my prep work for the Keller recipe. Somebody with the book please clarify something for me. In the ingredient list, Keller lists a bunch of stuff for the red wine reduction. Do I put the onions,et al in while I'm reducing the wine? Further into his instructions, he more or less says to add the onions and leeks etc to the wine reduction. I am so confused. And I've just started!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'm a little unclear as to why I would put all that stuff into a straight reduction and then add more of it afterwards?


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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FYI: There are three recipes for boeuf bourguignon availabe from the Washington Post. The recipes are from Bourdain, Ina Gartena and Keller.

Clickamundo

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FYI:  There are three recipes for boeuf bourguignon availabe from the Washington Post.  The recipes are from Bourdain, Ina Gartena and Keller.

Clickamundo

Bourdain's recipe is more like mine. Althoug I don't add carrots and I use shallots instead. I also use meat from the rib (you can get a great deal on it at a Korean Market. It's in the meat case, 4-5 pound whole piece.) I only add parsley, no bouqet garni. I don't add bacon either. I also add much more wine. And for those who care about authenticity, versions without bacon are authentic.

Ina- Please no canned broth. Clean, fresh water is SO much better than the tinny, salty taste that canned broth will inevitably give a dish.

Keller- No comment.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I'm a little unclear as to why I would put all that stuff into a straight reduction and then add more of it afterwards?

I do not have the book with me but from what i can remember:

During the wine reduction process, there is a number of vegetables that you are going to include with it before the wine comes to a boil. You are basically cooking down or "infusing" the wine with a bunch of aromatics (i think leek, carrot, onions, shallots, mushrooms and bouquert garni if i remember correctly). In your pot, it should look as if you had an equal ration of veggies to wine (so your veggies should not "swim" in the wine). Reduce the wine by almost 1/4 at medium heat (not too quickly), let the wine slowly cook down, thicken a little and become kind of "syrupy". When you reach that stage, throw the whole damn thing in a chinois and strain it by pressing as much liquid out of the vegetables (taste it, it is yummy on its own!! now you have a great base for a red wine sauce!). You now have your wine base. At a secondary stage, you will mix that wine base with your stock and a NEW batch of aromatics (i think just a mirepoix). This in essence, adds a second layer of flavors to your cooking liquid.

I hope this answers your question. :smile:


"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

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It does. The part that seems to be missing in Keller's recipe is to strain the reduction which of course makes sense. Of course I could be just missing that. Ok, beef is browning, wine is about to go on reduction!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Re the Citrusy discussion, many recipes call for orange peel to be added to beef/wine stews (And that's what it is, Stew. French stew with wine in it, don't feel we need to be too precious about it)

I use what my Butcher refers to as Rib trim, just the right amount of fat, good flavour and pretty cheap.

I also tend to use a fairly hefty Spanish Rioja. And some thyme if I have any.

Might not be authentic , but it's tasty and warms me up on a winters day.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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FYI:  There are three recipes for boeuf bourguignon availabe from the Washington Post.  The recipes are from Bourdain, Ina Gartena and Keller.

Clickamundo

Bourdain's recipe is more like mine. Althoug I don't add carrots and I use shallots instead. I also use meat from the rib (you can get a great deal on it at a Korean Market. It's in the meat case, 4-5 pound whole piece.) I only add parsley, no bouqet garni. I don't add bacon either. I also add much more wine. And for those who care about authenticity, versions without bacon are authentic.

Ina- Please no canned broth. Clean, fresh water is SO much better than the tinny, salty taste that canned broth will inevitably give a dish.

Keller- No comment.

I've decided I'll do Keller's this week, and Bourdain's next week. I want to do a taste comparision between complex and simple!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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It does.  The part that seems to be missing in Keller's recipe is to strain the reduction which of course makes sense.  Of course I could be just missing that.  Ok, beef is browning, wine is about to go on reduction!

Keller is an "over strainer". I think in this recipe he recommends straining at every stage (what, at least 5 or 6 times). I've followed his recommendation and when you only have ONE chinois (that ends up being rinced and cleaned after each use obviously) and so much cheese cloth to spare, it is a real pain. The result is fantastic though.


"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

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I just read Keller's version. It's actually not that complicated. He is basically applying some Cuisine Gastronomique cooking and plating techniques to a rustic dish. There are steps that a homecook could bypass to achieve pretty much the same results, if not the same look.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I just read Keller's version. It's actually not that complicated. He is basically applying some Cuisine Gastronomique cooking and plating techniques to a rustic dish. There are steps that a homecook could bypass to achieve pretty much the same results, if not the same look.

It is indeed not that complicated however, the beauty of this recipe lies in its pedagogical virtues. It teaches the homecook so much about certain aspects of "classic" cooking techniques. It involves at various steps infusing, reducing, marinating and braising techniques that can be applied in a myriad of other dishes. It not only does that but also shows how such techniques can impact the flavor, texture and complexity of each component of a particular dish.

It can certainly be shortenend but I would recommend anyone to try it, just because it is a great cooking "seminar" in itself for any homecook willing to learn.


"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

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What is this dish?  It sounds like Coq au vin with beef instead of chicken.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Best one I've heard all day. I thought the same thing when I first read the recipe.


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I just read Keller's version. It's actually not that complicated. He is basically applying some Cuisine Gastronomique cooking and plating techniques to a rustic dish. There are steps that a homecook could bypass to achieve pretty much the same results, if not the same look.

It is indeed not that complicated however, the beauty of this recipe lies in its pedagogical virtues. It teaches the homecook so much about certain aspects of "classic" cooking techniques. It involves at various steps infusing, reducing, marinating and braising techniques that can be applied in a myriad of other dishes. It not only does that but also shows how such techniques can impact the flavor, texture and complexity of each component of a particular dish.

It can certainly be shortenend but I would recommend anyone to try it, just because it is a great cooking "seminar" in itself for any homecook willing to learn.

Well, it's complicated to me :biggrin: . Seriously, I am doing this for exactly as you suggest, to learn. I am at a point in my home cooking where I am getting comfortable tackling the unknown and the more difficult. I will do this step by step as Keller specifies.

It's in the oven braising now.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Marlene-

Take it one step or stage at a time. Also be prepared to wash a lot of pots and pans. And sieves. LOL!


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Fortunately I have a lot of both! I have taken pictures as I go, but I'll wait until it's completely finished, then publish the step by step pictorial. One thing though, that red wine reduction smelled heavenly..


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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One thing though, that red wine reduction smelled heavenly..

Did you taste it? I'm telling you, you add butter to that and you have an amazing red wine sauce!!!!


"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

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What is this dish?  It sounds like Coq au vin with beef instead of chicken.

Except that coq au vin (oh, oh, oh!!!!) is another universe all unto itself.

Show me a pot of coq au vin and I'll show you an eGulleteer with a bib and a plate. :blink::wink:

hm, I think I'll start another thread on that one...

Soba

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One thing though, that red wine reduction smelled heavenly..

Did you taste it? I'm telling you, you add butter to that and you have an amazing red wine sauce!!!!

I did taste it. It never occured to me to add butter! :sad:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Here's my next question. Can one braise too long? It's 6:00 p.m. and the dish has been braising for about an hour and half. I checked the meat and it's not that tender yet. So probably another hour. The problem with that is I have to leave the house at 7:30 for about an hour. So I wouldn't have time to do the straining, defatting step before I leave. So I was thinking I could leave this in the oven at 200 until I get back. Is that going to be a problem?


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Here's my next question.  Can one braise too long?  It's 6:00 p.m. and the dish has been braising for about an hour and half.  I checked the meat and it's not that tender yet.  So probably another hour.  The problem with that is I have to leave the house at 7:30 for about an hour.  So I wouldn't have time to do the straining, defatting step before I leave.  So I was thinking I could leave this in the oven at 200 until I get back. Is that going to be a problem?

Not a problem, at least in my book. What cut of meat did you use?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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