Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Obscure Steakhouses


Mister_Cutlets
 Share

Recommended Posts

One of the things I miss most about Steven's old fat-guy site was his encompassing steakhouse guide. I learned about a lot of places there. Now I put the call out: Do any of you have 1st class steakhouse experience and experience with outer-borough or undermarketed restaurants? A lot

of people will tell you that Embers, Jackson Ave. Steakhouse, and so on are

the very last word in steak and (the magic words) "as good as Peter Luger's."

Sadly, they might be right these days...but realistically, are there any places

that compare to Sparks, Christ Cella, or Luger's on its best days? The only

steakhouses I've been led to that are really of the first rank are Robert's (the

place in the Penthouse Club) and the late Nebraska, which still has its bronx branch in business, or did the last I heard. I would surely like to know about

any new ones that I should try...I'm trying to get a revised edition of Meat Me in Manhattan in motion, and need to start researching soon.

I have to say that I was disappointed with V, MarkJoseph, the Strip House, and most of the other top-end places that opened in the last few years. (The Strip House is the best of these, for my money.)

signed (his mark)

Edited by Mister_Cutlets (log)
Mr-Cutlets.com: your source for advice, excerpts, Cutlets news, and links to buy Meat Me in Manhattan: A Carnivore's Guide to New York!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I'd call it obscure, but Pietro's on E. 43rd St. in Manhattan deserves more attention than it gets. The menu combines all the usual steakhouse favorites with some italian specialties. I think the steaks are competitive with the more often mentioned places in its neighborhood, and the salads, sides and other items are above average. Hope you can try it sometime, and let us all know what you think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I'd call it obscure, but Pietro's on E. 43rd St. in Manhattan deserves more attention than it gets. The menu combines all the usual steakhouse favorites with some italian specialties. I think the steaks are competitive with the more often mentioned places in its neighborhood, and the salads, sides and other items are above average. Hope you can try it sometime, and let us all know what you think.

2nd that re: Pietro's. last meal was too long ago, but i remember an excellent steak with a real bona fide caesar's salad prepared at the table. very old style, but not shy about the prices. actually the 43rd st location does not compare to the original location which had a huge amount of ambiance as well as great steaks. in moving, it lost both much of its clientele & its rakiskness. also, in all fairness, this was during the advent of many additional steakhouses in NYC, fragmenting Pietro's regulars.

Pietro's was very similar to 2 other old-time Italian steakhouses: the original Palm (before the franchising) but still here. & Joe & Rose's, no longer.

addendum: as i understand it from reliable sources, the original Palm is the ONLY one still serving dry-aged steaks, all the others serve wet-aged!! & supposedly, many of the other premium steakhouses around NYC, also serve wet-aged to their customers who mostly can't tell the difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a steakhouse, but since the book discusses shawarma/souvlaki:

Alfanoose, now at 8 Maiden Lane in lower Manhattan, skewers fresh meat -- not the "grayish-brown wad you've seen around town." I've not tasted the finished version, but if it's as good as his (shhh) vegetable dishes, it will be good indeed.

Also, Kebab Kafe, on the Korner of Fulton and Gold Streets has pretty good grilled meats -- so good and copious they make up for the chaotic service. Well, almost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I'd call it obscure, but Pietro's on E. 43rd St. in Manhattan deserves more attention than it gets. The menu combines all the usual steakhouse favorites with some italian specialties. I think the steaks are competitive with the more often mentioned places in its neighborhood, and the salads, sides and other items are above average. Hope you can try it sometime, and let us all know what you think.

2nd that re: Pietro's. last meal was too long ago, but i remember an excellent steak with a real bona fide caesar's salad prepared at the table. very old style, but not shy about the prices. actually the 43rd st location does not compare to the original location which had a huge amount of ambiance as well as great steaks. in moving, it lost both much of its clientele & its rakiskness. also, in all fairness, this was during the advent of many additional steakhouses in NYC, fragmenting Pietro's regulars.

Pietro's was very similar to 2 other old-time Italian steakhouses: the original Palm (before the franchising) but still here. & Joe & Rose's, no longer.

addendum: as i understand it from reliable sources, the original Palm is the ONLY one still serving dry-aged steaks, all the others serve wet-aged!! & supposedly, many of the other premium steakhouses around NYC, also serve wet-aged to their customers who mostly can't tell the difference.

I often go to pietros with my one friend who is a garmento.. This place is still a huge hangout for the garment industry.. The food is excellent, from the italian to the steak. Love the shells a la nat. Homemade biscotti. Havent been to the old location, but this place is packed regulars nightly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

addendum: as i understand it from reliable sources, the original Palm is the ONLY manhattan steakhouse still serving dry-aged steaks, all the others serve wet-aged!! & supposedly, many of the other premium steakhouses around NYC, claim dry-aged, but in actuality serve wet-aged to their customers who mostly can't tell the difference.

quote: daniel:

"I often go to pietros with my one friend who is a garmento.. This place is still a huge hangout for the garment industry.. The food is excellent, from the italian to the steak. Love the shells a la nat. Homemade biscotti. Havent been to the old location, but this place is packed regulars nightly."

add: the regulars at the old Pietro's were the Wall St crowd, coming up from downtown. obviously, before many firms moved to midtown.

Edited by jgould (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't know if I would use the word obscure, but I can't believe nobody has mentioned Keane's. I happen to love this place. A real old New York feel, great food and great service. The mutton chop is the star but the steaks are excellent as well. Does anyone know if these are "dry-aged" or "wet-aged"?

(their website says DRY)

http://www.keenssteakhouse.com/

~WBC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't know if I would use the word obscure, but I can't believe nobody has mentioned Keens.

A restaurant that's been around since 1885 probably can't be considered obscure. In Zagat, it's tied for 11th among steakhouses, with a food rating of 23.

Heh. Definately true. Thats why I can never understand how Keen's so often slips under the radar of great NYC steakhouse lists.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although not a steakhouse.... Mr. Cutlets have you tried the Cote du Boeuf for 2 at Balthazar? After Peter Luger's porterhouse, this was the best steak of my life.

P.S. I ended up here at e-gullet because of Fat Guy's treatise on steak. It was the most informative and educational piece about beef I ever read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't Uncle Jack's recently open a Manhattan version?

Yes, about a year ago. I was there not long after it opened. It was okay, but not a place I'd care to return to, especially not on a night when there's a game at the Garden.

This is what I said about my visit there. I must add that at least it is better than the last restaurant to occupy that space (MK's), but then even a McDonald's might have been an improvement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think any place is in the same league as Peter Luger with respect to the quality of the steak. So the other places are competing on the basis of, "sides, wine list, atmosphere and service much better; steak not quite as good." I'm not sure it qualifies as "obscure," but Fat Guy and I had a very good meal at Ben Benson's not too long ago that fit that bill.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...