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Yakiniku


shelora
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There is a new restaurant opening near me and they will be serving yaki niku. The chef has been trained in this style of cooking, in Japan. I can hardly wait to try it.

Can anyone speak informatively about this type of Japanese cuisine?

Arigato.

Shelora

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Yakiniku is grilled meat.

Typically very thin slices of raw meat are brought to your table, and your table also has some kind of heating device (gas or charcoal) coverd with a wire mesh grill. You cook the meat yourself, on the grill, then dip in sauce and eat.

Here's a quick link about yakiniku.

From what I hear, it draws very much upon the Korean style of grilling meat. Jim would be better able to talk about this.

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Like Palladion said ,yaki niku (yaki = grilled niku = meat) is the Japanese style of Korean grilled meats.

There are loads of yakiniku places all over Japan and they often sell other Korean dishes as well.

This is a type of do it by yourself cooking, so normally you will be presented with a platter of raw meat (sometimes seasoned, sometimes not) and you will cook it by yourself on a grill at your table. You will probably also receive dipping sauces to dip the meat into before eating. Other variations can include wrapping the meat in a lettuce leaf.

Here is a previous thread that discussing Korean style beef as well as yakiniku restaurants in the US:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...st=0&p=286737

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 5 months later...

we don't really talk enough about yakiniku. :biggrin:

First off for those of us in Japan, Gyukaku is having a special this weekend with almost half off some of their most popular dishes, including the beer!

Gyukaku

We are going tomorrow, my favorite harami is on sale at 290 yen (about $2.50) from 515 yen (about $5.00).

SO what are some of your favorite dishes at yakiniku places?

What are some of your favorite places?

Gyukaku is decent, definitely not the best, but I like their variety and the prices are good for our family of 5. I may be splurging a bit tomorrow. :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Had a great meal at Gyukaku last night!

started with 3 of their "specials" chicken (plate show 2 person serving), pork with a salt and onion sauce (2 servings) and harami with the soy based sauce (5 servings).

gallery_6134_549_24374.jpg

on the grill

gallery_6134_549_19115.jpg

a side of various kimchis

gallery_6134_549_16935.jpg

we also ordered some thick cut bacon, this was great!

gallery_6134_549_14717.jpg

and my favorite the chicken cartilage (nankotsu) with a miso sauce

gallery_6134_549_23627.jpg

web also ordered a couple more orders of beef as well as a couple bowls of rice and a lovely bowl of komtang (beef stock) soup)

gallery_6134_549_11492.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Since we saved so much money by ordering mostly the cheap items I decided to splurge and go for dessert. :biggrin:

Mia had the Kyoho grape sherbet

gallery_6134_549_12784.jpg

my husband and Julia had the Gyukaku special, vanilla ice cream with kuromitsu (dark brown sugar sryup) and kinako (toasted soy bean powder)

gallery_6134_549_1899.jpg

I had the kinako ice cream with a kuromitsu sauce and shiratama (rice flour dumplings)

gallery_6134_549_7940.jpg

the final cost of the meal for 5 was 7400 yen (about $70)

and my husband also had a beer....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Nice report Kristin. No dessert for your son?

We recently went to a place that, in addition to the usual beef and pork, had a section for shamo and kamo. The kamo wasn't anything special, but the shamo was superb, especially the hearts!

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Nice report Kristin.  No dessert for your son?

oops :biggrin:

Hide just had vanilla...

gallery_6134_549_13770.jpg

all decked out from head to toe in his Deka-ranger outfit that my in-laws bought for him, he was VERY popular in the kid's playroom at Gyukaku. :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Torakris! I'm afraid you're going to have to hand Hide over to me! :raz: I'm missing cute *little* boys like Hide round my house!

I estimate it costs 4,000 yen to have yakiniku at home if we really splurge...(she says, totting up the bill of ingredients for tonight's test-drive of the electric grill)...oh, and that includes oranges for dessert :laugh:

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Did you say Kinako icecream??!!!

Sounds fabulous!  :wub:

I wonder if I can I get the same desserts at the Gyukaku over here?

unfortunately not....., but they do have the Gyukaku special with kuromitsu and kinako powder. It is $2.95 in the US and it was only 180 yen here (about $1.70), that's a first.... :blink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Yakiniku is very popular here in Okinawa amongst our diverse poplulation. My daughter's love to go to a local yakiniku restaurant and sit in the "take off your shoes" area. There are two areas, one with booths and the other with sunken pits around the center grilling tables in which shoes are removed. Most yakiniku restuarants here are all you can eat and priced at 1980 yen for adults, 990 for kid's 5-12 and free for the little ones. A good selection and no one to blame but yourself if the meat gets burnt. Favorites are the short ribs miso flavored, lamb chops and the Bibimbap. Yakiniku must be one of the most popular cuisines here and ranks up there with curry houses and hamburger steak restaurants as the hidden Japanese staples not very well known in the US.

we don't really talk enough about yakiniku. :biggrin:

First off for those of us in Japan, Gyukaku is having a special this weekend with almost half off some of their most popular dishes, including the beer!

Gyukaku

We are going tomorrow, my favorite harami is on sale at 290 yen (about $2.50) from 515 yen (about $5.00).

SO what are some of your favorite dishes at yakiniku places?

What are some of your favorite places?

Gyukaku is decent, definitely not the best, but I like their variety and the prices are good for our family of 5. I may be splurging a bit tomorrow. :biggrin:

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  • 10 months later...

Last night we went to our favorite local, All You Can Eat Yakiniku parlor and had a great time. The dipping sauce you make yourself really sets off the flavors of the grilled meats. I always thought the four bottles on the tabletop were plain Soy Sauce, Rice Vinegar, Minced Garlic and Red Miso. On this particular visit I happened to try each individually to see what they really were.

The Miso and Garlic were correct, but the others I had wrong. The one I thought was vinegar is what I believe to be lemon juice. The other one has me stumped. It was a very sweet soy based sauce with a caramel color. Is there "sweet" soy available in the markets or does this sauce go by another name. Here is the link to the restaurant we went to:

http://www.tokukei.com/

Thanks again in advance for any insight!

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I got no clue from the website you provided a link to.  Are you suggesting that the 'yakiniku no tare' you tasted there is not the same as regular ones??

It wasn't the sauce the marinates the beef prior to grilling....it was a sauce you made yourself from the four condiments and is meant for dipping the cooked items.

I would have to describe it as a Very Sweet Soy Sauce with the same consistency. Possibly Soy mixed with Mirin but I didn't detect any alcohol in it. I hope this isn't too vague. I should have asked what it was on my previous visit but my lack of Japanese may have confused the matter.

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Hiroyuki, do you have the recipe for the marinate?  I mixed soy sauce, marin, sake, sugar, scallion, minced ginger and a spoonful of the Korean Gochujang (Chilli Paste) for my last 2 yakiniku parties.

No, just store-bought 'yakiniku no tare' for me. Yours sounds promising.

But the question is not the sauce that marinates the meat but one of the condiments. I haven't received a reply from the restaurant yet. I think I'll send them a reminder later.

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This is my recipe for a yakiniku marinade. This has plenty of flavor so no extra dipping sauce is needed.

In Japan there are usually two types of tare (sauce) for yakiniku:

momidare -- this sauce is used as the marinade

tsukedare -- this the dipping sauce

The tsukedare type is by far more popular, most yakiniku I eat at homes in Japan consists of slices of meat (usually with nothing on it, no salt or peper) grilled or griddle pan cooked and then dipped into a purchased tsukedare.

Some yakiniku places put the sliced meats on the plate an then just pour a bit of sauce on top as their momidare. The cheaper the place the more likely it is that the same sauce will be on every plate of meat. At some places you can even choose the kind of momidare that you want.

Here are some pictures of the yakiniku at Gyukaku (probably the biggest chain that also has branches overseas):

gallery_6134_549_24374.jpg

gallery_6134_549_23627.jpg

Most of their meats come with the choice of their regular sauce (soy based), salt based sauce, or a miso based sauce.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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The one I thought was vinegar is what I believe to be lemon juice. 

Most yakiniku places will have a lemon based sauce, or even straight lemon juice, this is used for the grilled tongue.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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The one I thought was vinegar is what I believe to be lemon juice. 

Most yakiniku places will have a lemon based sauce, or even straight lemon juice, this is used for the grilled tongue.

The acid of lemon will tenderize and flavor the meat.

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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This is my recipe for a yakiniku marinade. This has plenty of flavor so no extra dipping sauce is needed.

In Japan there are usually two types of tare (sauce) for yakiniku:

momidare -- this sauce is used as the marinade

tsukedare -- this the dipping sauce

The tsukedare type is by far more popular, most yakiniku I eat at homes in Japan consists of slices of meat (usually with nothing on it, no salt or peper) grilled or griddle pan cooked and then dipped into a purchased tsukedare.

Some yakiniku places put the sliced meats on the plate an then just pour a bit of sauce on top as their momidare. The cheaper the place the more likely it is that the same sauce will be on every plate of meat. At some places you can even choose the kind of momidare that you want.

Here are some pictures of the yakiniku at Gyukaku (probably the biggest chain that also has branches overseas):

gallery_6134_549_24374.jpg

gallery_6134_549_23627.jpg

Most of their meats come with the choice of their regular sauce (soy based), salt based sauce, or a miso based sauce.

Speaking of miso-based sauce, I had some great lamb with a red miso sauce on my last visit to our favorite yakiniku parlor. To make a miso sauce for yakiniku, do you simply marinate in red miso paste or are there other ingredients mixed in? Any pictures of what type of red miso to buy in the market would be appreciated as well!

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Speaking of miso-based sauce, I had some great lamb with a red miso sauce on my last visit to our favorite yakiniku parlor.  To make a miso sauce for yakiniku, do you simply marinate in red miso paste or are there other ingredients mixed in?  Any pictures of what type of red miso to buy in the market would be appreciated as well!

I tried looking in a couple Korean (in Japanese) cookbooks that I have and the recipes for their misodare were all really different, most of them are also dipping sauces rather than marinating.

I did find one recipe in English, you might want to use this as a starting point for experimenting.

Some of the misodare in yakiniku shops contain kochujang which can account for the red color. If you want to add a kick to your sauce I would suggest replacing some of the miso with kochujang.

As to what kind of miso, I would avoid using just white or hatcho (dark red) as alone they would be either too sweet or too strong. A blend would be the best, start with some plain all purpose miso and add something stronger or sweeter depending on your taste.

Though the recipe is for a dipping sauce I don't see why you can't use it for a marinade as well.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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OK, I see.  I still have no idea what it is, so I just sent an inquiry to that restaurant.

Thanks so much Hiroyuki! I'm looking forward to hearing their response....

I received a reply from Tokukei Group today. Unfortunately, not much information... :sad:

Part of the reply:

Regarding the soy tare you inquired about, we checked and found that it is Okinawa Goen's original tare.

Since you eat yakiniku by dipping in it, it seems to be a tare made after much trial and error so its taste won't be persistent.

Original:

お問い合せのしょう油ダレの件ですが、確認したところ、沖縄五苑

オリジナルのタレだという事でした。

焼肉につけて召し上がっていただいくわけですが、味がしつこくな

らないよう、いろいろ試行錯誤しながら作り上げたタレのようです。

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