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Tria


sara
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I'm intrigued by the review in today's Citypaper-- has anyone checked out Tria, the new wine/cheese/beer bar on 18th (123 s. 18th) yet??

Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.

-- William Grimes

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I'm intrigued by the review in today's Citypaper-- has anyone checked out Tria, the new wine/cheese/beer bar on 18th (123 s. 18th) yet??

Sara:

Owner is Jon Myerow, former Operations Director for all of Neil Stein's restaurants. Real smart, extremely service oriented fellow I owe a debt of gratitude for teaching me an awful lot of what I know about restaurant operations. He's very hands-on, so I'd expect that the menu and beverage selections are a reflection of his impeccable taste. The niche he's trying to fill is a place for a nice cheese platter, a decent glass of wine or a good beer. Not like anywhere else in the city.

I've walked by a bunch of times (it being all of a block away from me) and it looks real cute on the inside, but I haven't been in since it opened. I've heard good things though.

Please report back!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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i went about 2 weeks ago and had a great time. i tried 2 of their panninis (proscuitto and mortadella) and thought the mortadella was fabulous. although it was on a tues night, the place wasn't very busy and it took forever to get the sandwich. they also have a great (but small) beer list which i think goes with hams and cheeses much better than wine. i def reccomend it.

"i bet you smell like strawberry ice cream... the good kind" - e.dunn
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Went last week on a late afternoon (I think they open at 4:00). Pleasant decor, warm and knowledgable service.

They get their cheese from Murray's (NYC), so they're able to offer items that, presumably, one can't find here at, say, DiBruno's. The cheese selection is quite diverse and intriguing. Prices per wedge are in the $5-6 range, and of respectable portionage. I tried a self-constructed flight of Spanish cheeses -- one goat, one sheep and one cow (sorry; neglected to jot down the names), all very tasty. The cheese is served with a terrific honey; upon inquiry, it's local, from a purveyor named (and I'm not kidding) Buzzas. Also had an order of Niman Ranch speck (Germany's version of proscuitto). I always thought DiBruno's speck was great, but the Niman Ranch version is superb. Drank Vin Santo by the glass ($6).

All in all, a pleasant way to while away a late afternoon. The owner is very nice and engaging. I hope they do well.

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I had a nice bottle of Hitachino white ale there this afternoon, along with a good-sized block of chevre from massachusetts and a wedge of a pyrenees blue. Oh and a little of a friend's chunk of Montgomery's cheddar. They serve the cheddar with a dish of marinated cherries, and the goat with a dish of local honey. The cherries went really well with the goat cheese, though, so you might want to ask about that.

Very pleasant place, very friendly staff. I'll be back, probably relatively often, on my way home from work.

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I had a nice bottle of Hitachino white ale there this afternoon, along with a good-sized block of chevre from massachusetts and a wedge of a pyrenees blue.  Oh and a little of a friend's chunk of Montgomery's cheddar.  They serve the cheddar with a dish of marinated cherries, and the goat with a dish of local honey.  The cherries went really well with the goat cheese, though, so you might want to ask about that.

Very pleasant place, very friendly staff.  I'll be back, probably relatively often, on my way home from work.

James:

If indeed you're stopping there on your way home from work, give me a call first. I'd happily stroll up the block to join you since (I'm enbarrassed to say) I haven't been in to see Jon yet. I know almost the entire staff, since most of them are former staff members from Bleu. It would be a lot of fun to go see all of them and certainly to congratulate Jon on an enterprise obviously very well done. There's a really nice blurb in June's Philadelphia Magazine about Tria.

Cherries and goat cheese :wub::wub::wub:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Stopped by Friday evening for happy hour. Started out with the Dogfish Head 90-minute IPA and the gorgonzola and fig jelly bruschetta. Excellent. Moved on to the Allegash White and a grilled sopresatto sandwich. Excellent sandwich. Finished up with a Brooklyn Lager and the flourless chocolate cake. Fantastic. Stumbled home and promptly passed out. Can't wait to get back.

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Started out with the Dogfish Head 90-minute IPA

Not directly OT, but: Should you find yourself in the West Village sometime, stop by the Blind Tiger Ale House (Hudson @ W. 10th) to sample the Dogfish Head 90-min. IPA. BTAH is one of only (currently) three taverns in the country, I believe, featuring Randall the Enamel Animal, a filter (or an "organoleptic hop transducer module") packed with fresh hops, through which the ale is tapped. The result is a truly delicious, creamy yet bitter ale.

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Mrbigjas and I did indeed make it over to Tria last week and it's a terrific little spot. And an excellent addition to the dining scene in Philly. Excellent selection of beers, wines by the glass and a short but well thought out menu of panini sandwiches, little "snacks" like house made olive oil and rosemary potato chips, a bowl of olives, cured meats or various bruschetta in the $3-8 range. And an awe inspiring cheese selection, of course. A great place for light bite on the way home, before a movie or a show, or after the movie or show. It's really the perfect place for couples where he's a beer guy and she only drinks wine. Something for everyone.

I tried a glass of Austrian Gruner Veltliner and a glass of Oregon Pinot Noir, both of which were delicious. I seem to recall mrbigjas having a glass of Riesling to start and then a glass of Gamay. Staff was kind enough to send us a couple of samples of bruscetta - one with mushrooms and Fontina and the other with a Romesco sauce. Both were outstanding.

Service was friendly, knowledgeable and efficient and we had a nice chat with Chef Chris since we were sitting right near his prep area. The whole vibe of the place is quite laid back.

All in all a very pleasant visit and certainly someplace I'll be visiting again with some frequency.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Yeah I've been meaning to post about this. I also had the prosciutto rolled around fig/apricot chutney, which is a nice combination of salt and sweet--three rolls for about four bucks, if I remember right.

The menu there has four pages: snacks, wines, cheeses, beers. The key thing about the place is that it's obvious that when the put together the menu, they had a very specific idea what they wanted to do. Their wine list is all over the place, from prosecco to zinfandel, with interesting selections throughout--the Marigny-Neuf Gamay I had was one; they have rose in still and sparkling, and the Gruner Veltliner that Katie had. There are interesting beer choices as well, including Hitachino white, which is a Hefeweizen brewed in Japan. Nice beer, nice place.

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Sounds like a great place, good quality snacks without having to commit to a long meal! We sure need more of them around.

What are their hours by the way?

Edited by SG- (log)
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  • 2 months later...
18th & Sansom, on the northeast corner, where the Alaska Ice Cream place used to be. Don't know their hours, but it seems bar-ish, so I can't imagine it closing before midnight or so.

That location has a long and proud restaurant heritage. Used to be a wonderful little cafe on the second floor.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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18th & Sansom, on the northeast corner, where the Alaska Ice Cream place used to be.  Don't know their hours, but it seems bar-ish, so I can't imagine it closing before midnight or so.

That location has a long and proud restaurant heritage. Used to be a wonderful little cafe on the second floor.

Really? What else was there, in reverse chronological order from Alaska?

What was on the first floor when the cafe was there on the 2nd floor?

Can't think of anyone better qualified to edumicate me than you.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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As I recall the first floor had a few ice cream places. Before then it was the stylish maternity shop for Philadelphia.

Upstairs

Jay Gubin's Cheesecake Place - Named after an Aunt of his I recalled

A Backgammon Club

Holly Moore's Upstairs Cafe - Owned by Holly Moore

Holly Moore's Upstairs Cafe - Not Owned by Holly Moore

A Moroccan Restaurant

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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We ate there two weeks ago and we had a considerably better experience than Laban. I thought everything, from the tapas dishes to the wine to the cheese, was fantastic.

We shared a panini of prosciutto and fig jam that was positively sublime. We had a lovely little Malbec, and when asked for a recommendation for a complementing cheese our waiter was friendly and knowledgeable, and helped us pick a terrific one that really tied everything together. The mushroom bruschetta was meaty but not overwhelming, and the breadsticks with garlic dip were a little bit of heaven. The only dish I would have skipped is the sauteed asparagus, which were good but ultimately forgettable.

Anyway, the meal was excellent and just a hair over $40. Based on the quality and uniqueness (for lack of a less clumsy word) of the food and the overall pleasant experience, it was a bargain. We'll definitely be going back.

Edited by MysticMilt (log)
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I'm in agreement with MysticMilt. I've had several great experiences at Tria. They have one of the most unique wine by the glass selections in the city. The food is lovingly prepared from fresh ingredients. There's an incredibly cool beer selection. What's to bitch about? :unsure:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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As I recall the first floor had a few ice cream places. Before then it was the stylish maternity shop for Philadelphia.

Upstairs

Jay Gubin's Cheesecake Place - Named after an Aunt of his I recalled

A Backgammon Club

Holly Moore's Upstairs Cafe - Owned by Holly Moore

Holly Moore's Upstairs Cafe - Not Owned by Holly Moore

A Moroccan Restaurant

There used to be a stylish maternity shop in town? A predecessor to Belly?

Tell me more about versions 1 and 2 of Holly Moore's Cafe.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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I'm in agreement with MysticMilt. I've had several great experiences at Tria. They have one of the most unique wine by the glass selections in the city. The food is lovingly prepared from fresh ingredients. There's an incredibly cool beer selection. What's to bitch about? :unsure:

i loved that spanish rose they were carrying for a while.

last time i was there, i had the garlic breadsticks. and then i didn't have anything else for dinner. and then for other reasons i spent the night in the emergency room. and about 330 a.m. the heartburn i was experiencing was about as bad as any i've ever had.

so if you're going to be up all night with no dinner, i don't recommend the garlic breadsticks as your only nourishment for the day. other than that i have nothing bad to say about the place.

oh, except that they don't open early enough. i was dawdling around town on saturday and stopped in about 3, and they told me they didn't open till 4. which was sad because i was hot and wanted one of those hitachino hefeweisses they serve.

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The other thing that I love love love about Tria is that, IIRC, most (if not all) of their wines are available by the glass. My husband and I both love wine, but a bottle, and sometimes even half a bottle, is just too much wine for us, both money-wise and consumption-wise*. Most restaurants make only their lowest-quality wines available BTG, and since we're not Sutter Home folks, that usually means no wine with dinner. But at Tria we can try just about anything on the menu and split a glass and we're good.

* - Yes, yes, you oenophiles, I hear you. No such thing. Sheesh.

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oh, except that they don't open early enough.  i was dawdling around town on saturday and stopped in about 3, and they told me they didn't open till 4.  which was sad because i was hot and wanted one of those hitachino hefeweisses they serve.

Really? They claimed, a while back, that they were going to be open for lunch very very soon. Lying bastards.

For what it's worth, my one experience there was also better than LaBan's. I had a server who knew the menu backwards and forwards (or at least she faked it well), and the food was uniformly good. But man, it's easy to spend a lot of money there before you know what's happened. That's not a knock on Tria; it's just a reality of the tapas genre, I think.

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Really? They claimed, a while back, that they were going to be open for lunch very very soon. Lying bastards.

Depends on your definition of very very soon.

Someone with such a broad view of history as yourself should know that time is relative.

Doesn't mean that they're not lying bastards though.

Someone should bring it up with Ali Waks or Jon Myerow.

Volunteers?

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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