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Infusions

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This is sort of an off shoot to the Odd and New Ingredients thread.

Infusions are fun to make at home and we've had a spirited thread (sorry for the pun) enthusiastically sharing our triumphs and a few fixes for something that may not be going as planned.

Many of the infusions were pleasantly surprising with fantastic results!

Gary and/or Mardee -- have you dabbled in this? What are some of your favourite combinations?

Thanks! :smile:

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My all time favorite infusion is in our New Classic Cocktails book (there's also a great Limoncello recipe in there from Al Forno restaurant in Rhode Island). Here's my fave, though:

The Lark Creek Inn Tequila Infusion

Created by Bradley Ogden, Lark Creek Inn, Larkspur, CA, 1995.

1 pineapple, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks

1 serrano chile

1 sprig tarragon

1 750-ml bottle reposado tequila

1. Cut the top and tail from the chile and discard them. Slice the chile lengthways, down the center, remove the seeds, and place it into a large glass container with the pineapple chunks and the tarragon.

2. Cover the mixture with the tequila and allow it to rest for 48 to 60 hours in a cool, dark place.

3. Strain the tequila from the pineapple, chile, and tarragon through a double layer of dampened cheesecloth. Return the tequila to the bottle and chill it in the refrigerator or freezer for at least 12 hours.

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I should have added that you should start tasting this infusion as soon as it's been resting for 48 hours. There's a risk of the chile taking over the whole thing, and if you think it's getting to that point you should strain it immediately.

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My fave -utter fave- was transcribed by one Charles Baker in 1939 from a 1937 recipe. I repeat it verbaitim:

"Tequila por Mi Amante; Mexico City, 1937

This is a prepared beverage requiring patience and from three to four weeks.

Tequila, 1 pint

Ripe strawberries, 1 qt., cut in halves

Wash and stem the berries, put into an airtight jar or bottle, pour on enough tequila to cover. Shut tightly and stand for at least 21 days. Strain... This berry process extracts some of the raw taste, adds a rosy dawn touch. Our Mexican drinks it straight always. We opine that handled in the same way as sloe gin, discoveries would be made...."

I'm with the Mexican, here. It is just so unexpectedly delicious, I haven't been able to get past sipping it straight.

Food & drink lover Chuck Taggart brought this gem to my attention.

--Doc.

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.....maybe three months ago there was an incredible infusion thread somewhere here in egullet. I made watermelon jolly rancher infused vodka and the girls are still batting their eyes at me across the bar.

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.....maybe three months ago there was an incredible infusion thread somewhere here in egullet. I made watermelon jolly rancher infused vodka and the girls are still batting their eyes at me across the bar.

Lucky fella!! :cool:

I've got friends doing fun things with gin or rum, but mostly with vodka because it is so painlessly easy to approach the neutrality/versitality of the spirit.

Tequila! :wub:

Thank you Gary and drcocktail for sharing those! I can see both infusions being tried within the very near future.

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