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My local's offerings


ctgm
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Local pub

Thought that this might be of interest to show what hardships I have to put up with! Generally they have an interesting cask or two on tap. It is a well known pub with pretty frightening prices, but the beer is kept very well (apart from a bad patch a few months back)

Would be interested to hear what your local watering holes have to offer.

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geez, the White Horse is world famous! I've read about it in books.

My "local" is called "The Shepard & the Knucklehead." It's very small but the beer is very good. About 15 taps and 1 hand pump (very rare in the States). Most of the beers (about 9) are Rogue which is an Oregon brewery that's fantastic. Shakespeare Stout is probably their most famous brew. They also serve Wolaver's Pale Ale (Vermont) which is the closest thing I've ever had to an English Bitter in America. I'm in love with the place.

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Some years ago, I worked directly opposite the White Horse on Parson's Green, and spent many an evening sinking beer in said pub.

Mark Dorber, the then cellarman, and now, I think, the landlord, is a dedicated fan of Burton beers - he really supports the classic East Midlands style. One time - and we're talking about 1992-3, the White Horse ran a Burton beers beer festival, and put forward, amongst its offerings, a specially-produced (at the Bass Museum brewery I think) India pale ale. Said beer brewed out to 7.6 per cent alcohol and about seventy five units of bitterness - it was the scariest beer I have ever drunk, because any other beer of that strength would normally be sweet, and old ale in style. This was aggresively dry and hoppy - it was phenomenal.

Great pub. Shame about the dodgy sloanes that hang out there.

Adam

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That looks pretty good. I am hampered by the fact that I don't pay much attention to the beers I don't order, but my local (for beer anyway) usually offers the following on tap: Beamish, Boddington's, Sierra Nevada (IPA and Celebration), Magic Hat, Brooklyn Lager (I think it's called) and sometimes Sam Adams. sometimes Stella Artois. In bottle, the red and blue Chimays, a nice French beer in a large bottle with a picture of a gnome on the front (name?), among others. They will also pass you a can of Pabst.

Not bad for an American pub, I contend.

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Great pub. Shame about the dodgy sloanes that hang out there.

Adam

Adam,

I am sorry to say that you are spot on but at least you aren't going to get into any trouble there when enjoying a pint.

To be honest I moved away from the White Horse for a few months because of all their beers tasting really dirty. (Wasn't just me who thought so, 2 or 3 of my friends who drink proper beer thought so).

Didn't notice any Buron's on tap but will have a look next time i'm in but thought that their Yankee's ale was fantastic although lacking a little depth - perfect for 5.30pm though

Edited by ctgm (log)
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It's funny that they refer to Anchor Steam as "Californian Common Beer."

I believe it's referred to that way here in the States as well. I could be wrong, but I think any ale made with lager yeast fermented at ale temps is called California Common. :smile:

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I could be wrong, but I think any ale made with lager yeast fermented at ale temps is called California Common.

It's called California Common because, as the sole surviving (original) brewer of the style, the Anchor Brewing Co claims trademark protection of the term 'steam beer'.

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Antone's Pub and Grill in Cranford, N.J. has over 40 taps; easily the most in Jersey.

Tap beer is irrelevant -- it is dead and not worthy of being drunk.

Cask beer, properly hand pumped, is the only real ale. Sadly, this is a lost art in the States, where only a precious handfull make real ale.

I have three locals. The first is a Young's pubs, so I get Bitter, Special and the seasonal. The second has Battersea, Adnams and a guest. The third has Pride, Adnams and a guest.

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I agree - basically - with Mogsob, with one point of difference: so long as the beer is not dispensed using pressurised, but is actually pumped, it doesn't matter whether the pump is powered by elbow grease, by electricity or any other method (eg gravity). There aren't so many around nowadays, because the tall handpump is such a powerful marketing image for real ale, but until very recently lots of smaller breweries, especially in the north and Midlands of the UK used electric pumps. Their beer was still real.

Adam

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I have three locals. The first is a Young's pubs

Mogsob, I am under the assumption that you are in the NY area (as well as the pubs you mentioned). If so, do you mind listing the other 2? Thanks.

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Antone's Pub and Grill in Cranford, N.J. has over 40 taps; easily the most in Jersey.

Tap beer is irrelevant -- it is dead and not worthy of being drunk.

Cask beer, properly hand pumped, is the only real ale. Sadly, this is a lost art in the States, where only a precious handfull make real ale.

I have three locals. The first is a Young's pubs, so I get Bitter, Special and the seasonal. The second has Battersea, Adnams and a guest. The third has Pride, Adnams and a guest.

Mogsob is correct that it is very difficult to find Real Ale in the States but to say "dead" beer is unworthy of being drunk is just pure snobbery. Besides Mogsob, you're missing out on some good brews.

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Tap beer is irrelevant -- it is dead and not worthy of being drunk.

Cask beer, properly hand pumped, is the only real ale.  Sadly, this is a lost art in the States, where only a precious handfull make real ale...

Yeah! More tap beer for me! :biggrin:

I think the underlying quality of the beer is a lot more important to my level of satisfaction than the method by which it dispensed frankly. I will admit that I really enjoy the 'cask conditioned' beers that are offered at some places here in Seattle. Most use a nitro tap instead of an actual hand pump. Have to say that the places that do this usually serve their best quality beer in this manner.

You want lots of choices? Go to the Sunset Grill in Boston. When I was in school, they had something like 50 taps and another 200 beers by the bottle. Last time I was in town they were up to 110 taps and had a few hundred bottled. Its beer Disney Land.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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I think the underlying quality of the beer is a lot more important to my level of satisfaction than the method by which it dispensed frankly.  I will admit that I really enjoy the 'cask conditioned' beers that are offered at some places here in Seattle.  Most use a nitro tap instead of an actual hand pump.

Real cask conditioned ales are not dispensed with nitro pumps. Thus, Boddington's et al. as consummed stateside are not real ales.

The pubs I referred to are in London, but there are a few NY bars that serve real ale, most notably dba.

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I agree - basically - with Mogsob, with one point of difference: so long as the beer is not dispensed using pressurised, but is actually pumped, it doesn't matter whether the pump is powered by elbow grease, by electricity or any other method (eg gravity). There aren't so many around nowadays, because the tall handpump is such a powerful marketing image for real ale, but until very recently lots of smaller breweries, especially in the north and Midlands of the UK used electric pumps. Their beer was still real.

Adam

True enough. I have yet to encounter anything other than the hand pump, but your point is well taken.

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Washington DC - Monday nights at the Reef in Adams Morgan. There is a local brewer who brings a small cask of his ales and other brews on Monday evenings which sits ont he bar and is then sold until gone. Ask Brian the owner/bartender/beer guru what's on for the day. Last time I was there he had a delicious and strong barleywine on offer.

dba's sister establishment of the same name in New Orleans is also a good bet for ales.

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