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eje

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2007–2008)

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jmfangio   
The most interesting recipe for Sirop-de-Citron I reproduced in this eGullet post:

Sirop-de-Citron

You thinly slice three lemons, macerate them in 400kg of sugar for 4 days, briefly boil them, and then mash and strain.  I've no idea why I haven't done that yet.  Laziness.  It seems like it would be a lot more intense than other versions I've read.  Definitely get some of the bitter kick from the pith.

There was a similar recipe for a homemade lime cordial on The Spirit World last month. I made it with yuzu and lime, and it has a wonderful depth of flavor, and (so far) is holding up very well in the fridge. (I couldn't find tartaric acid so I made it without, and I don't think that it suffered for it).

edit: fixed wonky quoting.


Edited by jmfangio (log)

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eje   
i've gone threw quite alot of clayton's kola tonic but never had the roses... i don't think you could balance 1/2 of clayton's with 3/4 oz. lemon juice... it would be quite tart beyond the average of most people's tastes... clayton's is fairly complex stuff with lots of gingery notes. i don't really think it is challengingly bitter at all. i wonder if turn of the century tonics were comparable to jamaican "rootsman" tonics that you can get today. the are bitter, very complex, and usually have kola nuts as the dominant flavor.

i just helped my pastry chef to make bergamot orange sorbet... pretty wild stuff.  the unchilled base of a lemon sorbet might be somewhat like syrup de citron...

[...]

Interesting about Clayton's. It does sound like it is a bit less sweet and maybe more complex than the Rose's Kola. To me Rose's is more about cinnamon-ish spice and musty funk than ginger. However, I wouldn't put the sweetness of the Rose's too far from Cinzano Rosso. I just don't think it has as much bitterness to balance that sweetness. I'll have to try Dr. Cocktails formulation for the Filmograph later this week.

You're absolutely right in suggesting that methods are similar for making a sorbet base and Sirop (syrups.) You could probably use recipes interchangeably.

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Finally got my hands on my own original copy of the Savoy Cocktail Book this week, :smile:, so I'll be able to follow this thread with more interest.

My copy included a couple of newspaper clippings (every book I seem to get my hands on does). One of them was an article printed when Harry Craddock retired, titled Invented the 'White Lady'.

SEVENTY-FOUR YEAR OLD Harry Craddock, one of the world's best-known barmen - he has been at the American bar of the Dorchester Hotel, London since 1939 - retired yesterday.

In 55 years he has mixed 20,000,000 cocktails - in Chicago, New York, London.  He claims 250 cocktails, including the "White Lady" and "Paradise" as Craddock inventions.

"As an appetiser, one cocktail is enough," he says.  "Two is plenty and three is not half enough."

There's also a 'Cointreau cocktail card' (don't know how else to describe it :wacko: ) that includes recipes for :-

The Silent Third Cocktail

1/3 Cointreau

1/3 Lemon Juice

1/3 Scotch Whisky

The Sidecar Cocktail

1/3 Cointreau

1/3 Lemon Juice

1/3 Brandy

The White Lady Cocktail

1/3 Cointreau

1/3 Lemon Juice

1/3 London Gin

The card is stamped on the back by 'Aylward & Sons LTD. Winchester'.

There's also a recipe for 'Ginger Pop' that a previous owner has left in the book, as well as a recipe for 'Sloe Gin' that's been hand-written into the back of the book.

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eje   

Cool, Adam!

Which version/printing of the Savoy Cocktail Book?

A couple odd things we've noticed with some first editions, is they may contain the Bacardi Cocktail on a slip of paper. Some others seem to have been manufactured in cooperation with Booth's Gin, and have a section at the back dedicated to recipes for cocktails with Booth's.

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_47826.jpg

Fine and Dandy Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)

1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)

1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, it is a "Fine and Dandy" cocktail. It doesn't quite match the special magic of either the Pegu Club or the Sidecar. Still, all in all, quite enjoyable.

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eje   
[...]

Fine and Dandy Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)

1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)

1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

[...]

Oh, and it is nice not to have to second guess a single ingredient or technique for a change! Lemon Juice, check. Cointreau, check. Plymouth Gin, check, (well, ok, there might be a slight "proof" issue here.) Angostura Bitters, check. Shake well and strain. And we're done!

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Which version/printing of the Savoy Cocktail Book?

It's a first edition. My (ex) girlfriend, :sad: , got it for my birthday.

A couple odd things we've noticed with some first editions, is they may contain the Bacardi Cocktail on a slip of paper.

Yeah, that's the one that I have. :smile: The Bacardi Cocktail is on a slip of paper between pages 24/25.

On the inside cover, someone has written their name (which I can't make out properly) and the date, 12.11.1930

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jmfangio   
SEVENTY-FOUR YEAR OLD Harry Craddock, one of the world's best-known barmen - he has been at the American bar of the Dorchester Hotel, London since 1939 - retired yesterday.

In 55 years he has mixed 20,000,000 cocktails - in Chicago, New York, London.  He claims 250 cocktails, including the "White Lady" and "Paradise" as Craddock inventions.

"As an appetiser, one cocktail is enough," he says.  "Two is plenty and three is not half enough."

Hmmm...so Harry may not have just been cribbing recipes, but quotes as well. I believe it was James Thurber who said, "One martini is all right. Two are too many, and three are not enough."

(My apologies to Harry's memory if indeed it was Thurber who was cribbing from him).

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_31234.jpg

Five-Fifteen Cocktail

1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Luxardo Orange Triplum)

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I knew I'd made something like this before: Bud's Special Cocktail. This is nominally closer to idea of a Creamsickle in drink form, than the Bud's Special had been, and a bit more pleasant. Still, not really the sort of drink I can finish.

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_5618.jpg

Fluffy Ruffles Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry, 1/4 oz Inner Circle Green)

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini and Rossi Rosso)

The Peel of 1 Lime or Piece of Lemon. (Peel from a lime)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (For extra fun, I added the peel to the drink for the picture. It looked neat, but made it difficult to drink.)

OK, I couldn't resist slipping a little "character rum" in to zip up the flavor of the Flor de Cana in this cocktail. If Havana Club is any indication of the flavor vintage Bacardi Rum had, it probably had a little more funk than the very clean Flor de Cana.

The Fluffy Ruffles is a pleasant, lime tinged, rum Manhattan. I dare you to order it!

A quick google tells me "Fluffy Ruffles" was musical comedy by Hattie Williams which made its theatrical debut at New York's Criterion Theatre in the fall of 1908. Many of the songs in this production were co-written by Jerome Kern. Also, I find sheet music from earlier dates than that, so it appears it was first a ragtime song, or perhaps just that it was a popular name for songs, well, being that it refers to the fluffy ruffles of women's petticoats.

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_3829.jpg

Flying Scotchman Cocktail

(6 People)

2 1/2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)

3 Glasses Scotch Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch)

1 Tablespoonful Bitters. (Generous couple dashes Angostura Bitters)

1 Tablespoonful Sugar Syrup. (1/2 teaspoon Depaz Cane Syrup)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

A slightly sweetened and rather heavily bittered Rob Roy?

Perfectly enjoyable cocktail, as far as I am concerned.

"The Flying Scotchman" train running between Edinburgh and London, was, for a time in the 1800s, the fastest train in the world. It appears it was only bested in 1888 by a train called the "West Coast Flyer":

FLYING OVER THE RAILS; THE FAMOUS "FLYING SCOTCHMAN" OUTDONE.A TEST OF SPEED ON TWO GREAT ENGLISH RAILROADS--ATTAINING A RATE OF 75 MILES AN HOUR.

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Flying Scotchman Cocktail

(6 People)

2 1/2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)

3 Glasses Scotch Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Compass Box Asyla Scotch)

1 Tablespoonful Bitters. (Generous couple dashes Angostura Bitters)

1 Tablespoonful Sugar Syrup. (1/2 teaspoon Depaz Cane Syrup)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

A slightly sweetened and rather heavily bittered Rob Roy?

I always wonder with recipes like this whether the "bitters" in question are aromatic bitters or aperitif bitters. Maybe it's worth trying this one out with one of the Italian amari?

Edited to add quote, and then to say:

Oh, wait. I just realized I was mixing units. The tablespoonful of bitters is for the 6-people portion, not the scaled down version. Oops!


Edited by mkayahara (log)

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_22108.jpg

Four Flush Cocktail

1 Dash Grenadine or Syrup. (homemade)

1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/4 Swedish Punch. (1/2 oz Carlshamm's Flaggpunsch)

1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Flor de Cana Rum)

(1/4 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Drop in a cherry garnish.)

Again unable to resist the urge to add a touch of "character rum" to a cocktail calling for Bacardi.

Quite sweet, but not unpleasant. I'm always surprised by how dominant the Swedish Punsch is in the cocktails which contain it.

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_35322.jpg

Fourth Degree Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray Dry Gin)

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)

4 Dashes of Absinthe. (1 tsp. Absinthe Verte de Fougerolles)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel on top.)

I was all set to say I preferred this cocktail with the proportions dried out a bit. I've made it in the past with 2 oz Junipero, 1/2 oz French Vermouth, and 1/2 oz Italian Vermouth and really enjoyed it. I've made that version for friends and they've really enjoyed it. Other times, I've made the equal parts version with different ingredients and not enjoyed it as much.

This time, for whatever reason, this particular combination of ingredients was fantastic. There was a cherry/almond flavor that seemed to come out of nowhere, blindsiding me, and daring me to replicate it. What do you call that? Flavor harmonics?

The Savoy version of this Harry McElhone Cocktail doesn't include the lemon peel garnish, but it really takes the drink to another level. I don't recommend skipping it.

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slkinsey   

Anyone know the origin of the name "Fourth Degree"?

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eje   

Doesn't really answer your question, but, interesting nonetheless...

Robert Vermeire, in his 1922 book "Cocktails: How to Mix Them," includes the Third and Fourth Degree cocktails along with the Martinez.

Saying, "The Fourth Degree is a Martinez Cocktail (Continental Style) with a dash of Absinthe and a cherry, but 1/4 gill of Gin, 1/8 gill of French Vermouth, 1/8 gill of Vermouth should be used."

About The Third Degree, he says, "The Third Degree is a Martinez Cocktail (Continental Style) with a dash of Absinthe and an olive, but 2/6 gill of Gin and 1/6 gill of French Vermouth should be used."

He gives the "continental style" of Martinez as:

Fill the bar glass half full of broken ice and add:

2 dashes Orange Bitters

3 dashes of Curacao or Maraschino

1/4 gill of Old Tom Gin

1/4 gill of French Vermouth

Stir up well, strain into a cocktail-glass, add olive or cherry to taste, and squeeze lemon-peel on top.  This drink is very popular on the Continent.

He uses the term "Continental" to differentiate from the English style of Martinez:

In England the Martinez Cocktail generally contains the following ingredients:

2 dashes of Orange Syrup

2 dashes of Angostura Bitters

1/4 gill of Plymouth Gin

1/4 gill of French Vermouth

The whole stirred up in ice in the bar glass, strained into a cocktail-glass with a lemon peel squeezed on top.  Olive or Cherry according to taste.

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slkinsey   

Hmm. The Third Degree cocktail recipes I'm used to seeing have dry vermouth and pastis.

Mostly I'm wondering about the name, though.

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Hmm.  The Third Degree cocktail recipes I'm used to seeing have dry vermouth and pastis.

Mostly I'm wondering about the name, though.

it was a movie from 1926... movie inspired cocktail names seem to be popular...

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eje   

Phrases.co.uk Explains the phrase "Third Degree":

The classification of the qualities of objects by degree - heat and cold, moisture and dryness etc. - was commonplace in the middle ages. Henry Lyte's translation of Dodoens' Niewe herball or historie of plantes, 1578 includes a description of rue:

    "Rue is hoate and dry in the thirde degree."

Including this amusing quote from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, 1601:

"For he's in the third degree of drinke: hee's drown'd: go looke after him."

But, most common use of the "Third Degree" refers to the Masons. When a candidate enters the "third degree," or "Master Mason," they are subjected to a number of tests including an interrogation.

To me, the use of the term for the drink is probably related to the the masonic use. It's a complex and sophisticated cocktail. Something Joe and Judy Schmo, (or Jacques and Jacqueline,) in from the country for a night on the town aren't probably going to appreciate. They're going to want gimlets, sidecars, or highballs. Something a little simpler. It probably takes a "third degree adept of drinkology," to properly appreciate this variation on the Martinez.

In regards "Absinthe," by 1922 Absinthe had been banned in France, where Vermeire was bartending, for around 8 years. Unless he was using homemade steepsinthe or illegally produced Absinthe, he was probably using post-ban "Pernod" in these cocktails. I don't believe the term "Pastis" was used commonly to refer to these post-ban products until more recently. At least, I don't remember seeing the term "pastis" as an ingredient in cocktail books until relatively modern times.

Though, if a bartender was pulling out a stash of banned Absinthe, that would really be something you would imagine they would reserve for "Third Degree Bar Adepts" and very good friends.

The Fourth Degree of Masonry is the "Mark Master."

edit - By the way, this theory is just complete and utter speculation on my part.


Edited by eje (log)

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Killer Cocktails states without further explanation that the 'Third Degree' cocktail was so named for it's excessive dryness, being 7:1 at a time when 1:1 was the norm. I think it's one drink where a very light touch with the absinthe really is needed. It seems to intensify the juniper aspects of the drink.

As for the Fourth Degree, I have nothing but wild and uneducated (but stopping short of wildly uneducated) speculation.

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eje   

Well, I was a bit surprised to see Vermeire calling for Dry Vermouth in his Martinez, but his recipe for the Third Degree is not particularly dry or unusual, at least for Cocktails of that era. Two parts Gin to one part Dry Vermouth, as far as my feeble brain can interpret the "gills" in the Third Degree. And then the Fourth Degree, being essentially the same amount of gin, but splitting the vermouth portion into sweet and dry.

I don't have a vintage copy of MacElhone to judge from.

I guess I do wonder, in regards the "continental" Martinez, if one was supposed to drop or leave in the Curacao and Orange Bitters or skip them in the Third and Fourth Degree cocktails.

I haven't gotten that far in my experimentation in variations to see if the cocktails are pleasant with or without the Orange. Generally orange and Absinthe is a nice combination.

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Enjoying this discussion a lot, very interesting.

Here are the recipes from McElhone's 1927 "Barflies & Cocktails".

Third Degree Cocktail

2/3 Plymouth Gin,

1/3 French Vermouth,

4 Dashes of Absinthe

Shake well and strain into old-fashioned whisky glass.

Fourth Degree Cocktail

1/3 Gin,

1/3 French Vermouth,

1/3 Italian Vermouth,

4 Dashes Absinthe

The recipe from his "ABC of Mixing Cocktails " from roughly the same period is identical except for specifying "Burrough's Beefeater Gin" for the Third Degree and "Ballor" as the brand of Italian Vermouth in the Fourth Degree.

Cheers,

Jeff

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Well, I was a bit surprised to see Vermeire calling for Dry Vermouth in his Martinez, but his recipe for the Third Degree is not particularly dry or unusual, at least for Cocktails of that era.  Two parts Gin to one part Dry Vermouth, as far as my feeble brain can interpret the "gills" in the Third Degree.  And then the Fourth Degree, being essentially the same amount of gin, but splitting the vermouth portion into sweet and dry.

I don't have a vintage copy of MacElhone to judge from.

I guess I do wonder, in regards the "continental" Martinez, if one was supposed to drop or leave in the Curacao and Orange Bitters or skip them in the Third and Fourth Degree cocktails.

I haven't gotten that far in my experimentation in variations to see if the cocktails are pleasant with or without the Orange.  Generally orange and Absinthe is a nice combination.

Sorry didn't mean to say that the recipes you gave were especially dry, but I was under the impression that a dryer drink was the norm for that name. I wonder if an American traveling in the UK might have tried to order a 3rd Degree and instructed the puzzled bartender that it is simply a Martini(ez) with Absinthe, and hence. Speculation sure but it seems plausible enough. Of course that still doesn't help with the Fourth Degree, unless it were to take a 'Third Degree' to the next level by adding another ingredient (sweet vermouth).

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eje   

gallery_27569_3038_34004.jpg

Fox River Cocktail

4 Dashes Peach Bitters. (1 tsp Fee's Peach Bitters)

1 Lump of ice.

1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)

3/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Use wineglass and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Hmmm...

Looking at this now, it seems like it should be built, old fashioned style, rather than stirred with ice and strained into a glass as I did.

All the same, I was OK with everything here except the lemon twist. I just didn't like how the lemon combined with the chocolate, peach, and whiskey.

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eje   
Enjoying this discussion a lot, very interesting.

Here are the recipes from McElhone's 1927 "Barflies & Cocktails".

Third Degree Cocktail

2/3 Plymouth Gin,

1/3 French Vermouth,

4 Dashes of Absinthe

Shake well and strain into old-fashioned whisky glass.

Fourth Degree Cocktail

1/3 Gin,

1/3 French Vermouth,

1/3 Italian Vermouth,

4 Dashes Absinthe

The recipe from his "ABC of Mixing Cocktails " from roughly the same period is identical except for specifying "Burrough's Beefeater Gin" for the Third Degree and "Ballor" as the brand of Italian Vermouth in the Fourth Degree.

Cheers,

Jeff

Thanks Jeff!

Nice to know Craddock and his editors occasionally get a recipe right...

One Question...

Is it Harry MacElhone or McElhone? I've seen it both ways and am a bit confused which is correct.

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