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SobaAddict70

Cacciatore

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Sort of relevant to discussions about turkey leftovers, not to mention that I'll probably have this for dinner sometime next week, as leftover cacciatore gets better the day after or even two days after. A side variant of chicken cacciatore is chicken marengo (aka "hunter's chicken", which contains on occasion wild mushrooms and sometimes cognac or brandy, in addition to tomatoes, peppers, onions and the usual battuto).

So what's your favorite version of cacciatore? And what do you serve it with -- rice, grits, potatoes, noodles?

The real thing is so much better than your typical tv dinner (Stouffer's or Swanson's).

Discuss...

SA

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Sort of relevant to discussions about turkey leftovers, not to mention that I'll probably have this for dinner sometime next week, as leftover cacciatore gets better the day after or even two days after.  A side variant of chicken cacciatore is chicken marengo (aka "hunter's chicken", which contains on occasion wild mushrooms and sometimes cognac or brandy, in addition to tomatoes, peppers, onions and the usual battuto).

So what's your favorite version of cacciatore?  And what do you serve it with -- rice, grits, potatoes, noodles?

The real thing is so much better than your typical tv dinner (Stouffer's or Swanson's).

Discuss...

SA

I serve it alongside a big bowl of steaming hot, plain pasta as a side dish, lightly dressed with just a little evoo, S&P (the pasta, I mean). Sometimes, a smear of garlic, or dusting of P.Reg.

And occasionally, all the way to Pasta Carbonara.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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You are so right about it getting better. Like just about every braise. :smile:

My mother only used chicken, tomatoes, onions, sweet peppers, garlic, and mushrooms. Me too. I grew up eating it over plain boiled white rice. But now I also serve it with any cut pasta shape I have in the house that holds sauce well. Maybe sometime I'll use polenta or grits, though; thanks for the suggestion.

BTW, SA: do you leave the chicken on the bone? I figure you do, just asking.

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I serve mine with roasted garlic mashed potatoes, which, as I write this, seems like overkill with all the flavors going on the the cacciaitore, but that's the way we like it.


Stop Family Violence

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My version is exactly the same as Suzanne's and always served over rice for the husband and kids. I eat it with a big chunk of bread.

I like the idea of pasta or polenta.

I make a Greek style dish that is similar except for the additions of kalamata olives and feta, I serve this over orzo and it is a great combo.

I bet cacciatore would work with orzo as well.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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A side variant of chicken cacciatore is chicken marengo (aka "hunter's chicken", which contains on occasion wild mushrooms and sometimes cognac or brandy, in addition to tomatoes, peppers, onions and the usual battuto).

Errr, not quite. Chicken Cacciatore is hunter's chicken. Chicken Marengo was supposedly put together by Napoleon's chef on the battlefield and named after Napoleon's horse Marengo.

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Dana~

You just hit it on the head!~

Sometimes you just gotta disconnect the lobe of the brain that says too much..overpower...not right...shouldnt do...and say hey look....if I LIKE it this way....then its RIGHT!

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