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Epicurious.com


YoChefGregg
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On Epicurious' main page, they have a link to a recipe section, the link is called Soups & Sammies.

WTH, is that a Rachael Ray invented term? :wacko:

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Water Boils Roughly

Cold Eggs Coagulating

Egg Salad On Rye

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Gregg Robinson

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Either:

(a) we are all in for a large dose of Rachel Ray's personal contrived infantile lexicon for foods or ...

(b) we are headed down the 'steep slope' of inane verbiage by this young woman ...

In any event, seeing this on the Epicurious website, and so prominently featured, makes me just the tiniest bit nauseous ... :huh:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Either:

(a) we are all in for a large dose of Rachel Ray's personal contrived infantile lexicon for foods or ...

(b) we are headed down the 'steep slope' of inane verbiage by this young woman ...

In any event, seeing this on the Epicurious website, and so prominently featured, makes me just the tiniest bit nauseous ...  :huh:

try listening to your morning news and hearing the traffic reporter mention that there is a "jamm-o" on the road..... :wacko:

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On Epicurious' main page, they have a link to a recipe section, the link is called Soups & Sammies.

WTH, is that a Rachael Ray invented term? :wacko:

It could be worse, at least it wasn't "Stoups and sammies"

<grin, duck and run>

Pamela Fanstill aka "PamelaF"
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It is midwestern slang for sandwiches.

Could of fooled me. I'm pure Midwesterner and I never heard that term until reading message boards online.

Davydd

It is just an Anglicized Welsh spelling for David to celebrate my English/Welsh ancestry. The Welsh have no "v" in their alphabet or it would be spelled Dafydd.

I must warn you. My passion is the Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich

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On Epicurious' main page, they have a link to a recipe section, the link is called Soups & Sammies.

WTH, is that a Rachael Ray invented term? :wacko:

Gregg, where is that unfortunate link? I can't seem to locate it.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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"Gregg, where is that unfortunate link? I can't seem to locate it. "

fg- you know it's funny, i saw this soup and sammies link on epicurious when i was looking around for a recipie. alittle later i saw this thread (maybe 10/15 minutes later). went back to epicurious to see it again, and it was gone. vanished.

coincidence? i think not!

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:hmmm:

I noticed that the headline vanished quickly, but I didn't notice just how quickly.

Wow. And thankfully.

I'm also a midwesterner, and have never heard that term used for a sandwich.

-------------------------

Water Boils Roughly

Cold Eggs Coagulating

Egg Salad On Rye

-------------------------

Gregg Robinson

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On Epicurious' main page, they have a link to a recipe section, the link is called Soups & Sammies.

WTH, is that a Rachael Ray invented term? :wacko:

the term "sammies" has been around long before Rachel Ray landed on TV, everyone might, or might not, be interested to know.

Edited by tommy (log)
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  • 3 weeks later...
It is midwestern slang for sandwiches.

' Sammie ' is a very common term used in New Zealand, Australia and the UK to describe a sandwich.

I, for one, am not in the least bit snobbish about the word. Its cute. :raz:

It would sound better if said by a Brit or Aussie (it too is a derivation): like "telly," "ciggie," or the rest. I remember in the last century some said "drinkie pooh" for cocktail. It's baby talk so I get why a mother might "sammy" to her kids.

Edited by pangloss (log)
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