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maxmillan

How to keep raisins from sinking in pound cake?

9 posts in this topic

I'm sure there is something written here about this subject.

I tried coating the raisins/berries in flour and mixing it last into the batter and it still sinks to the bottom.

How does one fix this problem so that the raisins/berries are dispersed evenly throughout the cake?

Thanks.

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I'm sure there is something written here about this subject. 

I tried coating the raisins/berries in flour and mixing it last into the batter and it still sinks to the bottom.

How does one fix this problem so that the raisins/berries are dispersed evenly throughout the cake?

Thanks.

Dust them with flour and add them last.


Living hard will take its toll...

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I'm sure there is something written here about this subject. 

I tried coating the raisins/berries in flour and mixing it last into the batter and it still sinks to the bottom.

How does one fix this problem so that the raisins/berries are dispersed evenly throughout the cake?

Thanks.

Dust them with flour and add them last.

That is, indeed, about the only general rule pertaining to the subject.

I fold final ingredients in rather than beat them, but otherwise I'd suspect your batter is too thin. Do you measure or weigh your ingredients?

SB (big advocate of measuring by weight) :wink:

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This is actually a question my sister had when baking her pound cake. She did coat her raisins with flour. She filled her pan with 3/4 of the batter, sprinkled the flour-coated raisins (not too many) and topped with the rest of the batter.

Yet those darn raisins sank to the bottom. I assume her pound cake batter would be thick. So how thick should a batter be when one wants to keep berries or raisins from sinking?

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I personally dont think coating with flour helps , it actually makes the raisins heavyer. Personally when i make cakes like fruit cake or plum cake with raisins and stuff i follow the recepie and i cooked for the first 10 minut on higher temperature then lower the temperature for the rest of the time ( depends how long needs to bake and stuff ).And I do think the thickness of the batter influence on the sinking .


Vanessa

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Chop them a bit maybe, make them smaller???? Use currants???

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I had this problem and found that if I used a lower grade flour the fruits (chocolate chips etc.) will not sink. If she is using cake flour, she can try replacing it with AP and see if that works.

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Hi there,

I have bake cakes with raisins and mixed fruits, I normally fold them in towards the end gently and do not stir too many times. Just a few gentle folds and pour the batter into the baking tin and into the oven.

Hopes this helps...


Cheers...

Don

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Flour does help with dry fruits

It doesn't make them heavier, the flour absorbs into the batter, it grips to the batter.

Your batter is too thin.

Fold the ingredients at the end before putting in your pan.

try this:

1# Butter

16.8oz Sugar

12.8 oz eggs

.4 oz vanilla

.2 oz salt

1 # Pastry Flour

1/10 oz baking powder

3.6 oz sour cream

8 oz garnish (raisins)

You can multiply that if you want, it should give you right around two normal sized pound cakes.


Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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