Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Creme Anglaise


Franci
 Share

Recommended Posts

I need your advice. I always been taught in school that for creme anglaise as well for any other custard I should always "blanchir" the eggs. For my chef was expecially important for the creme anglaise in gelato making.

Well, here is the thing: I was just discussing with friends about a recipe that reccomand for creme anglaise to incorporate the less air possible. One of my friend agrees, he thinks that cooking the cream deflates anyway and that creates an annoying unnecessary foam.

So, now I was thinking of all the skimming done for pots de creme and so, to much foam for nothing?

I am looking for a better technical answer for my friend: is the recipe also my friend right or the whipping effect the final taste of custards and creme anglaise in particular?

THANK YOU

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say no, don't whip the eggs for any custard. Whipping incorporates air, which is in the form of bubbles. I don't think cooking removes the air (think meringue). If you incorporate air, you will get bubbles in your custard.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's my opinion that it's OK to whip the eggs, but unnecessary and a complete waste of time. If you reach the proper temperature with the anglaise, all that air will be cooked out anyway, and it just makes it harder to tell when it's done. Of course you do need to mix the sugar into the eggs a bit so they don't "cook" and get grainy before tempering in the liquid, but a quick whisk is all you need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Neil. Whipping the eggs in creme anglaise is about as pointless as measuring two different flours seperately for bread, its still going to have the same result.

When you temper the eggs with the cream you will probably most if not all of the air anyways. Then as Neil said, cooking it will deflate it due to the fat in the cream and constant whipping/stirring.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't even warm the milk and temper in. I just mix it all together minus my flavoring and cook until done, strain, flavor and done. It comes out exactly as the other more involved technique. I work with a French chef and he can't tell the difference.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bring my cream and sugar up to a boil, turn off the heat (cause I'm usually doing something else at this moment) pour in my yolks, give it a couple stirs and it's done. I totally don't believe in the need to whisk together the sugar and yolks..........and I don't even temper the cream into my yolks anymore. It's all just more steps.

I don't get lumps of cooked yolks with my unorthodox method, believe it or not. If I did, it wouldn't matter because I pour it thru a strainer anyway.

I'm totally against tons of applications that call for whipped yolks and sugar. Rarely is it needed, usually it's deflated by a wet ingredient in the end. And tempering with anything but chocolate.......is for the shy or in-experienced...........jmo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...