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Felice

Salon Saveurs des Plaisirs Gourmands

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The Salon Saveurs starts this weekend. I've never been and was thinking of going on Friday night. Has anyone been?

The details can be found in the "What's Happening" thread under events for December


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The Salon Saveurs starts this weekend.  I've never been and was thinking of going on Friday night.  Has anyone been?

The details can be found in the "What's Happening" thread under events for December

Thanks Phyllis.

I'm pretty sure David Bizer went a few years ago since his thread mentions it.

Also, aside from info in "What's Happening," this week's Figaro Madame magazine has a piece on four reasons to go.


John Talbott

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We attended last Saturday. It was literally fabulous, probably the size of 3 to 4 of the fall Fermier shows, with many more prestige items. There is a pan-European presence with aisles dedicated to Italian products as well as a smaller representation from Spanish, German, Polish producers.

We bought an eclectic assortment that ranged from the best violet mustard I have found to Duval's classic andouillettes, with truffle butter, jars of caramel and German pumpkin seed oil along the way.

I would actually plan the timing of a visit to coincide with this event, coupled with the Vignorons Independent expo the previous weekend. I didn't catch the Figaro Madame article, but, trust me, there are many hundreds of reasons to go! :rolleyes:


eGullet member #80.

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I went, too, and also has lunch in that Italian osteria they imported from Venise with chef-owner, staff and all! Wasn't bad. Also met a kilt-wearing Scotsman who makes "Le Gar Normand" apple cider...


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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Excited that I'll finally be in Paris for one of these. Any reason that I shouldn't go? Also, are there particular types of products which tend to be particularly unusual? I haven't been able to find a web site for this spring's event.


Shira

Paris

lespetitpois.blogspot.com

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Just go! Do make sure to take at least one large carrier bag. Think of buying for gifts. This show is enormous. Products cover everything from savory to sweet, dairy, fresh and preserved meats/fowl/fish/shellfish. Huge range of confitures, pates, foie gras, sausages, oh my, so vast!

The only mistake we made, and I will never forgive my husband for insisting on it, was stopping and enjoying a shared bowl of Royan ravioli, boiled and served with a large splash of heavy cream. Absolutely delicious, but it completely spoiled my ability to sample anything else for the rest of the show. Talk about the wrong time and place!

I noticed that there was a free pass for the December show in the November issue of Saveurs or Elle a Table. It might pay you to look for one in the current issues for the spring show. However, if you stand at near the entrance, someone most often approach you and offer an extra complementary ticket.

Enjoy, and let us know your finds.

Note: be aware that if you are flying to the US, you will have to pack jams, oils, syrups, etc. in your checked luggage. We do this all the time, packing them in bubble pack and, if very fragile, also in light cardboard. We've never had anything break.


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Thanks for the response! I'm actually living in France, so imagine that most everything will be consumed here (or brought to a few lucky people in the UK). I think that rather than trying to squeeze it in after work on Friday, I'll devote the better part of a weekend day to it.


Shira

Paris

lespetitpois.blogspot.com

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