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The cabbage thread has gotten me thinking about these. I had never heard of them before I made the recipe for the mango achar this weekend.

Are their certain types that are more common then others? any "traditional ones?

What are they normally eaten with?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Here's a nyonya acar recipe (uses cabbage too!)

http://www.kuali.com/recipes/viewrecipe.asp?r=208

The acar recipe linked by SG is known as Acar Awak - this is probably the most common type of acar available. I remember my gran making it.

Other types of acar are:

- Acar Timun (Cucumber Acar)

- Acar Nenas (Pineapple Acar)

- Acar Buah (Fruit acar - preserved limes, prunes, nutmeg, starfruit, kedondong)

- Acar Mangga (Mango Acar)

- Acar Ikan Masin (Salt fish Acar)

- Acar Ikan (Fish Acar)

- Acar Cili (Acar of whole chillies)

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  • 4 years later...

Our language seems to have a lot of similarities with Indonesian's and Malaysian's. Achar is probably the same as Atsara(no letter c in our alphabet), a ginger flavoured sweet pickled slaw?

Our traditional version atsara is made with julienned green papayas, red peppers and carrots. It is pickled with sugar vinegar and ginger. To cut down on the richness of fried food and fatty foods, this pickle is served with fried fish, chicken or pork....I think?

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You are right Fugu, atsara (Filipino word for picked vegetable relish) is usually served with fried/grilled meats such as pork, fish or chicken. It is a traditional sidedish in a lot of restaurants serving grilled items. I don't particularly like it as most of the restaurant version are too sweet for my liking. I do like our pickled quail and pearl onions atsara.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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You are all making me hungry! Domestic Goddess if you have any more recipes for these please *beg* post recipes. Thank you!

Anyone else? I think I will be making the cabbage one sometime soon I hope. I have to get some kimchi made to, not to mention cookies. *sigh*

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Fugu - I didn't know you wanted the humba recipe. Lemme search my files for it.

Here is my great-uncles Pickled Egg and Pearl Onions Achara

Achara (Pickled Quail Eggs and Pearl Onions)

INGREDIENTS:

1-1/2 cups cooked quail eggs, peeled

1/4 cup thinly sliced carrot disks

12 pearl onions, peeled

1/2 cup vinegar

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 tsp. Salt

1/8 tsp. Black ground pepper

1 tsp. Finely chopped fresh ginger

Mix eggs, carrots and onions in a deep glass bowl. Set aside.

Boil the vinegar, sugar, ginger, salt and pepper uncovered in

a cooking pan for 2 - 4 minutes. Pour the eggs/onions mixture over

cover for 5 - 8 minutes, then remove from the pan to a glass

bowl. Let it cool, transfer into clear, sterilized bottles and then refrigerate. After a week or so, your atsara is ready to be eaten.

Humba recipe coming up.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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I know this may be OT but this is the recipe for Pork Humba... (which is also good paired with atsara)

Pork Humba

1 Pork leg (complete with knuckles) or 1 kilo pork belly cut in chunks

1 whole garlic head, minced,

3 pcs star anise,

10 oz. banana blossoms (about a dozen pieces)

1 tsp whole peppercorns

1/4 tsp ground black pepper

5 bay leaves

1/2 cup dark soy sauce

1/4 cup of white vinegar

1/2 cup brown sugar

1 1/2 cups water

1 tsp MSG

3 Tbs Rice wine or chinese wine (optional)

6 peeled, hard-boiled eggs

1. Have the butcher slice the pork leg into 1 1/2 inch round slices and halve the knuckles. If you're using pork belly or any other kind of pork meat (just make sure it is fatty), cut into 2X2 inches chunks.

2. Boil the pork meat first for 15 mins. then throw the water.

3. Add all the ingredients in a clean pot and simmer until the meat is soft and tender. Add more water if it looks like it is drying up. Don't add too much water and make sure the sauce is thick not soupy.

3. Add the hard-boiled eggs at the end and make sure the sauce coats everything. Served with fresh, hot rice.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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