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I am having a standard seder this year, that means chicken soup with kneidlach, gefilte fish, salads of all sorts, baked salmon and roast beef. I will also do roasted potatoes, yams,onions, garlic and beets-all in one dish.

I am thinking of making it unusual by theme. I have not yet decided but I imagine a small puddle at the entrance of my house, through which everyone will have to cross in order to enter. Any more ideas would be great. I know that my in laws will refuse to do this... :angry:

Edited by Lior (log)
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Lior:

Wouldn't it be better to have two tubs of water on either side of the entrace so that the "waters are parted", so to speak? Seems a bit more historically accurate and a lot neater. No need to have wet dirty feet tracking into the house...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Well perhaps having the waters more "contained" will get the reluctant in-laws to get into the spirit a bit more. It's not like you'll be leaving them a choice if they want to come in the door and eat, yeah? :wink:

What about some frogs for the water? Float some lily pads and you could feed them some crickets from the pet store and wipe out two plagues at once!

The children I have celebrated 2nd night with the past several years have a "Plagues Bag" that has plastic bugs, frogs, a cow mask with pox for cattle disease, sunglasses for the plague of darkness, etc. that really make that part of the seder come alive. I'm certain someone with your creative energies could create their own version of THIS.

If you were feeling particularly morbid you could paint around the door with washable vegetable dye. That might be overkill though. :rolleyes:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I like the idea of theme decorating!

I'm making my first gluten-free seder. Fortunately, it isn't too challenging. I've found a pretty good looking matzo ball recipe that uses almond meal and potato starch, though I haven't done a test run yet. I've ordered special gluten-free schmura matzo (made from oats). I'll probably make a lamb and artichoke dish, though the kids are lobbying for brisket. Haven't figured out dessert yet, but probably either a flourless chocolate cake or a nut cake.

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Hi

Are the oats gluten free?? Sound interesting! I eat gluten free...

The plagues bag is cool! I am sure I can work something out. I will look for plastic frogs for the tubs. The weird thing is that this last week or two we have been having very odd weather and we are inflicted with crickets! Ugh! My cats have great fun with them.

Some fake blood, frogs in the tubs- I will try to catch some crickets in a jar, sunglasses for darkness- cattle disease-I have cow salt and pepper shakers and mugs-can do something here. Lice? I will put a lice treatment shampoo on the table! Any other silly ideas! This is such fun! Thank you!

BTW, we put an extra matza for Gilad Shalit, who is not free and we ache about this greatly, so anyone who wants to think about him could also do this.

Edited by Lior (log)
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Yes, the oats are certified gluten-free. They come from a company in New Jersey. On the website it says that, according to halachic authority, they can only be eaten by people that can't tolerate gluten. We're not that observant, so I haven't checked independently. Here's the website:

http://www.lakewoodmatzoh.com/matzoh_gluten_free.asp

There is also a company in England that looks like it has distributors in Israel:

http://www.glutenfreeoatmatzos.com/

It is also possible to find gefilte fish made without matzo meal, if one is, like me, too lazy to make it from scratch.

For some other decor ideas, you could probably rig up a burning bush in a corner somewhere, and a large rubber snake for Moses's staff.

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We have friends who have hung something like banners that look like the sea along the 2 sides of their walkway to the door. Each year I mean to get there to see them but as yet, I haven't. Not sure if there are fish attached or painted on also....

jayne

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I'm just starting to think about what we'll serve for night #2. I have no idea what to make, though I have lots of recipe to choose from. We will serve meat, so I'm thinking of herbed cornish hens and some form of beef -- or maybe a slow roasted lamb shoulder. Somebody told me you're not supposed to eat lamb on Pesach - anybody know anything about that?

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I'm just starting to think about what we'll serve for night #2. I have no idea what to make, though I have lots of recipe to choose from. We will serve meat, so I'm thinking of herbed cornish hens and some form of beef -- or maybe a slow roasted lamb shoulder. Somebody told me you're not supposed to eat lamb on Pesach - anybody know anything about that?

So we should just have a shank bone sitting on the seder plate and the rest of the poor lamb should go to waste?? That certainly seems antithetical just on principle if nothing else. Why would there be a prohibition on lamb?

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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My sister-in-law just confirmed that she will do the 1st night. Their house has better space for this. So that means that, once again, I'm dessert girl. I've developed my list of standard and yummy Passover desserts that can generally be considered cookies. Actually, Passover or not, I long ago tired of making cakes and such and having everyone pass or take just a sliver and leave most of it on their plate. Not that I'm trying to get people fat but if I make a cake, it's there to be eaten. It has been my experience however that people will eat things if you give them stuff they can pick up and eat with their hands.

Among my "standard" Passover desserts are:

Almond macaroons

Coconut macaroons

Chocolate-almond brownie bites

Brown-sugar pecan macaroons

Meringue "kisses" of various flavors

Matzah brittle

etc, etc, etc.

I am looking at various cake/torte type recipes because I do enjoy making them.

And, of course, Grandma's matzah farfel muffins but those are savory to eat before and during the meal.

Now to think about the 2nd night when we're back home.

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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I'm tasked with bringing a "starchy" (as opposed to vegetable) side dish...and happy to have confirmed that Quinoa is OK for Passover (it's a seed), the Trader Joe's brand passes muster because it is processed in a plant that has no grain products. So at least one dish on the table will be light, flavorful, and healthy.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Just a few quick notes.

The active ingredients of baking powder are baking soda and monocalcium phosphate, both permitted on Passover. Most non Passover powders contain corn starch, which may or may noy be allowed based upon your custom. Replace the corn starch with potato starch and it is permitted.

Lior - you should find oat matza made in the UK supervised by Rabbi Kentenbaum, whom I know. It is valid for Pesach since it is one of the five grains.

Edited by Mikels (log)
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The not eating of Lamb only applies to European Jews. The usual explanation given is that lamb was used at the time of the Temple. However, that cant be the whole truth, since Jews from the Middle East eat it. I heard a lecture given by Danny Lasker who traces it back to the middle ages in Europe. The lamb has specific religious significance in the Christian religion. Eating lamb was tied to blood libels and therefore not permitted since it could have led to pogroms.

Edited by Mikels (log)
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I have not found this oat matza. Perhaps it is only in special stores-maybe our tiny health foodstore will have it-I will check 2morrow-thanks.

Well after standing in line for meat for 2 hours today (grrr) with everyone forgetting who is after who (only by the poultry section can you pull a number for an organized wait-go figure), Anyway, many people got lamb/sheep etc. I see my mashgiah tomorrow so I will see what he hasto say. I also saw bicarb on the shelves... also never knew I could use it.

I have my MIL's recipe for charoset that her father used to make while still in Yemen, if anyone is interested. It is originally gound with a mortar and pestle, but my MIL does it in her old meat grinder. I am going to do it in my kitchen aid attachment grinder and see if it works! It is very well liked.

Edited by Lior (log)
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Streit's also made oat matzo this year -- at least they were supposed to. The case I ordered never turned up. Though for Lior, I doubt that helps (can you get US matzo in Israel?). In North America you may be able to find it.

We've decided on a rib roast for seder #2. That's as far as we've gotten.

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I think we're doing pretty much a repeat of last year's menu:

matzoh ball soup

smoked whitefish/sole gefilte fish with horseradish mayo

potato tagine

swiss chard with roasted carrots

Last year I made matzoh crack and macarons for dessert, but this year I delegated and we've got a flourless chocolate torte, kosher-for-passover noodle kugel, and macaroons coming.

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Excited as I was to discover that quinoa is kosher for Passover, I'm adding THIS recipe for Cranberry Almond quinoa to the menu for our vegetarian seder. I definitely want to eat some carbs that aren't matzoh based. :biggrin:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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