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Alleguede

"Bachour"

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I just received from the US the book Bachour.

It brings plated desserts to a imaginable level with plenty of different recipes and ideas to use and modify.

I think it's a great debut for the author and for one who wants to practice or learn gastronomic plated desserts.

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I have wondered about purchasing that one. I need to up the ante with my desserts. Thanks for the recommendation.

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