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tiramisu

Sfogliatelle

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ate this pastry in a deli in cambridge and was in heaven. anyone know the authentic recipe? is it always with ricotta cheese?

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there was a cake boss episode where they made these. First they made a dough and then ran it through a sheeter several times. When it was thin enough they sheeted it out onto a long worktable and while of them skated shortening over it with his hands, buddy began rolling it up and pulling it into a longer and longer log. then he cut the log into thick disks and basically the drill is to push the center of the pastry out, telescoping the layers. buddy then piped pate a choux into them so they won't collapse when baked. looks like skilled labor to me. i had one from modern pastry in the north end of boston and you could see and taste the pate a choux. neat trick. i tried them at home and it was a no-go. you need a big lump of dough to make a roll with enough diameter. a pasta machine just won't do it.

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There is a recipe for sfogliatelle in Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook. I haven't gotten around to trying it yet. However, my pastry instructor is the one who told me about it, and he had made this particular recipe several times. It is a lot of work, but I think the end result is worth it!! Good luck!

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Also a recipe in a book by Nick Malgieri called Great Italian Desserts. Not sure if it is still in print.


Edited by rickster (log)

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Never made them, but I had the pleasure of eating (many) in Naples, where there are two different kinds: the flaky, crispy kind called riccia (which definitely didn't have pate a choux holding it together) and the frolla kind, which are softer. Riccia pictured here, from Schaturchio:

sfogliatelle.jpg

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thanks for the reply will give the martha stewart recipe a try

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thanks for the reply will give the martha stewart recipe a try

^^ Just curious how it turned out! I've been having trouble finding a recipe that works!

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The recent issue of Breadlines, the magazine of the Breadbakers Guild of America, had a very detailed recipe accompanying a story on a Guild sponsored Italian holiday pastries class.

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I love this pastry. From what I've gathered, it is very labor intensive, to the point that bakeries would buy the dough instead of making it themselves. I've also never had one with pate a choux holding it together. I think that would ruin that very crispy exterior to creamy interior contrast.

This recipe seems to be portioned to be made with a pasta machine: http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/sfogliatelle

Haven't tried it though.

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