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Sformati


SWISS_CHEF
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I have been on a sformato binge lately. I have done all the usual, like artichoke, asparagus, fennel, carrot, cardoon, red pepper, spinach etc. but on Christmas Eve we are invited to go to some friend's house and I must bring something vegetarian along for a pot-luck dinner so I am looking around for some unusual combinations.

If you come up with something really interesting and I will make it, photograph it and post it here...

(If you don't already know: a sformato is basically just a savory flan)

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I have totally fallen in love with the roasted cauliflower that has it's own thread here on eG. After eating it hot out of the oven - the leftovers that make it into the fridge get incorporated into pasta sauce or soup. I add lots of cream or creme fraiche, fresh parmesan, maybe some chervil or whatever looks good in my herb garden. I suspect it would make a great base for your sformato.

I assume of course that cauliflower is available to you?

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I have totally fallen in love with the roasted cauliflower that has it's own thread here on eG.  After eating it hot out of the oven - the leftovers that make it into the fridge get incorporated into pasta sauce or soup.  I add lots of cream or creme fraiche, fresh parmesan, maybe some chervil or whatever looks good in my herb garden.  I suspect it would make a great base for your sformato.

I assume of course that cauliflower is available to you?

I think that's a great idea! My mom used to make this dish when I was growing up; it was steamed cauliflower added to chicken broth with Angelhair pasta and lots of parmesan cheese. I think she might have also dropped a couple of raw eggs into the simmering soup just before serving (?). Very satisfying. I think it'd be delicious with the roasted cauliflower, too.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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  • 8 months later...

This answers my question that brought me here.

In reading Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes, I found mention of Sformato di Carciofi. Seemed like something I would like but am not sure how it would be made. I did do some searches but was still confused.

Beware Babelfish translations. They are really weird.

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Offhand I'd say you probably steam the hearts until soft and puree them. Traditional sformati, or at least the kind in Piemonte, involve a bechamel base, eggs, cheese, and then the puree of vegetables. Bake in individual custard molds or one large one, using a hot water bath around them as they bake (375-400F).

I must say that I've been making sformati for years without the bechamel, instead using 3 egg yolks and one egg, and a little milk, then cheese. When I did try it with the bechamel I found that it didn't seem to add much more to the game for the extra prep involved.

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Thanks Kevin. I love anything artichoke but Ms. Mayes didn't give a description, just mentioned how good it was.

I haven't tried making it yet but plan to get some artichokes when I shop today. I didn't really care for the idea of Bechemal in it myself.

I found one site yesterday that showed the artichokes just cut into quarters. It looked very good but I couldn't find it again.

Almost all the recipes on-line are in Italian and I know very little Italian (except food) so even with dictionary in hand I have a hard time figuring things out.

On-line translations are beyond ridiculous.

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