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EsaK

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Everything posted by EsaK

  1. I recently got an old Kenwood mixer, and with it two attachments, the K-beater and the wirewhisk. The whisk seems to be made of stainless steel, so it looks quite alright. But the K-beater is I believe aluminum, and doesn't look too fine. When touched, you get the aluminum in your hands. I googled through but got such a mixed bag of opinions that I decided to ask here. Is that beater beyond redemption, or can it be saved and used safely? And if yes, then how should I go about redeeming it?
  2. Is there any possibility to hear about this cheesecake and the recipe for it? It looks so delicious to this fan of cheesecakes...
  3. I'm trying to find a mixer that could handle doughs etc for the next 10 years. What I've gathered is that Kenwoods seem the most durable option for handling tougher doughs, and KMM710 Major Premier which I view as the cheapest, yet still likely good enough, costs 350 euros. So I thought, if I can get an overall better version for 550 euros then it might not be such a bad idea. No special application really. Would imagine using it for kneading, pastry doughs, and then if it could handle my occassional sous vide needs then that'd be great. I agree that a multitasker is not generally what I want. Still, if someone has experience or knowledge of the cooking chef models, especially the KM070, I'm all ears.
  4. I'm considering buying the Kenwood Cooking Chef as I could get it used for 550 euros ($600). Since I don't yet have a sous vide setup (nor a stand mixer, but a very good food processor) I'd be interested in hearing if CC works as an OK replacement or is the temperature range/stirring thing disabling that? (I'm not expecting it to be precise to 0.1°C, 1-2°C would be fine for me). Also, any other pointers are warmly welcomed. EDIT: Just to be clear, it's the KM070 version. Reading quite a lot of reviews of people getting in some issues with it is quite troubling.
  5. EsaK

    Making Vinegar

    Somewhere in the earlier pages it was asked how could a vinegar mother be "stored", and I didn't see any thoughts on it. F.e. I have wine or fruit juices very rarely under normal circumstances, but I would hate to give up my vinegar mother. So if I want to avoid having it sit in some, say apple cider vinegar, for too long (to not make it turn watery), and avoid killing the mother, is there any way to store it? I can dry a sourdough starter and then get back to it later, but how could I store a vinegar mother to preserve it? First thought that came to mind was covering it with 10% white vinegar, don't know if that's a good or bad idea. Please help
  6. EsaK

    Making Vinegar

    My apple cider has been in its jar for about a month now, and some days ago I purchased apple vinegar from the store (not organic, didn't think it had a mother of any kind really). The cider hadn't really changed much as far as I could see, so I decided to put some of the apple vinegar in with it. Well, didn't take long until something happened. Now I'm very unsure if what I have is good or bad. Hopefully the thing can be seen from the pictures. It's a white/opaque "disk" that floats on top. Is that what I want to see, or is it some sort of bad mold?
  7. EsaK

    Making Vinegar

    And how would you recommend trying if I may ask? Put the cider in a glass jar (for a week, two weeks?) with a cheesecloth on top, in 27-30°C room temp (it's very hot in our apartment during summer) and wait? Something I'm missing, something to notice? Many thanks for your responses!
  8. EsaK

    Making Vinegar

    So you wouldn't use even the first one that according to the ingredient list contains just sulphites (which I think are preservatives in there)? The cider's have 4.7% alcohol in them so I guess that's covered. And quite a bit of suagar in there as well.
  9. EsaK

    Making Vinegar

    Bumping up an old thread. I just got a bunch of apple and pear ciders that I don't think I will drink. I started thinking that I'd like to try and make vinegar out of some cans. I read a bunch of things and feel puzzled. Ideas In Food's Aki & Alex are saying (http://blog.ideasinfood.com/ideas_in_food/2013/01/cider-vinegar.html) that just leaving the cider exposed to air would produce apple cider vinegar (I have no idea if their cider is similar enough to what I have). The ciders (Finnish) I have contain a) apple wine, apple juice concentrate, carbon dioxide, apple flavourants (and sulphite), b) apple wine juice, apple juice concentrate, carbon dioxide, acidity regulator, flavours, preservatives (potassium sorbate, sodium disulphite), sweeteners, colours. Could someone be so kind and give some instructions as to how I could try turn these into vinegars?
  10. EsaK

    Cheesecake

    Big fan of cheesecakes here too. Someone mentioned freezing them, and I was wondering if there was some knowledge I'm lacking on that front. I've tried freezing them several times but seem to always end up with soggyness after de-frosted. Hate to have a great cheesecake frozen and then swimming in liquid when I take it out and want to eat it. What kind of cheesecakes have you managed to freeze without the liquid seeping out (egg-based or something else, some binder added?), and how have you actually done it (de-frosted in fridge, room-temp etc)? Thanks for all the help!
  11. Thanks for the thoughts cakewalk! The few breads I've made with it were okay, not superbly open textures. Taste was quite nicely sour I think. I took it as a good indicator when I made the crackers with only the discarded starter and they tasted almost like ones from the store (which are delicious, mine were less great). The openness/rising I would imagine is due to many factors other than the starter. If they should be rising close to like with yeast though, then there's probably something wrong. And as you mention, the top really doesn't look bubbly at all. I've stored the discarded parts in a plastic jug in the fridge where you can see that even in the fridge it develops quite a bit of bubbles. Same thing in the roomtemp, the bubbles are under the surface mostly. Now I'm thinking I should start a new one with AP flour (or rye, that's what they used to use) and see if the starter rises and how it smells/tastes..
  12. Need help with my starter... I've had it going for like 3 weeks or so now, feeding it each day. So, roomtemp is around 20-21°C, I began the starter with equal grams water and AP. After a few days, I started feeding whole wheat flour. Each night, I took out 100g and put in 50g (the last week I changed flour to 60g) flour and 50g water and stirred. It has smelled yeasty, soapy, alcoholy or something like that everyday. I've made all kinds of things with it and there certainly is a sourdough flavor to it. Made some "crackers" with only the discarded starter, and they tasted very much like the sourdough crackers we have here. The issue I have is that I'm really not sure if something's wrong with my starter or is it as it should be? I can't notice any rising within an hour, two hours or the next day after I've fed it. And sometime before I began using 60g/50g flour/water to feed it, it took on a dry looking surface. Below are two pictures, roughly 1hr after feeding (it looked exactly the same right after feeding, 1hr, 2hrs later) and the next morning (which is what it looks like the whole day, kinda dried on the surface). Any thoughts and help would be greatly appreciated!
  13. Any chance you might lay out the steps you took to get this result, and the ratios you used?
  14. I should've taken a picture of it but it certainly looked like mold. Couple of little white moldy dots with some darker stuff in the middle. I didn't really take a look at them before the 4th day so I don't know if it was first "scum" and then developed into mold? No clue really.
  15. Anyone kind enough to help me with this safety question in anyway? Should these be okay, or was there something fundamentally wrong with my ingredients/pickling process?
  16. Many thanks keychris! I messed up the ratios at first when it said somewhere that you could use f.e. cup flour, cup water. Changed it to be equal flour and water in grams, looks nice. Another question that came to mind was whether there was any real meaning behind the "discard half, add original amount of flour and water"? Say, I start with 100g flour + 100g water. Discard 100g of starter, then I should add 100g flour and 100g water again, making my starter 50% bigger. Am I missing/compromising on something if I don't want to make my starter any bigger? Intuitively I'd say it shouldn't matter, but then again I don't really know. Thanks!
  17. I attempted pickling with the basic, cucumber. Now I'm wondering if I can eat them, or should it be discarded. I had roughly 100g whey, 150g water, 12.5g salt in the liquid. Added cleaned cucumbers, was in 19-20°C cupboard for 4 days with a piece of plastic wrap to keep cucumbers submerged and a cloth on top. Today, 4th day, when I looked at them, the plastic wrap had mold on it and the liquid on the bottom is rather cloudy. I don't find an off-smell, haven't tasted them. Somewhere I read that mold on top may not be such a bad thing with these, but I'm very hesitant to eat them without knowing more. Anyone know what's going on, what I might have done wrong?
  18. The last bread I made was from Gluten-Free Flour Power, a gluten-free potato bread. Tasted and was all-in-all quite decent I thought. Now, I hope this is an appropriate place to ask these beginner's questions. I decided to start building a sourdough starter, 100g AP flour + 185g water. 1) when discarding half of it every day, can I theoretically just use it in any baking recipe (to replace 50g flour and 92.5g water, or how does one scale it)? 2) If I want to incorporate for example rye, whole wheat into the starter, should I simply use that flour instead of AP when adding the fresh flour to the starter? 3) I read that if you refridgerate the starter, you should take it into room temp 24hrs before using it. Is there a reason why I couldn't put it in the fridge and then add it, say, to a no-knead dough raised in fridge? Many thanks for the help!
  19. From what I've read, kropsu is specifically from Pohjanmaa/Ostrobothnia. Biggest difference to pannukakku is supposed to be that kropsu is thinner and somewhat crispy on top, whereas pannukakku is more "custardy" / thicker and not crispy. Joululimppu is great. Put some cured salmon on top of that and you're good to go. And for karjalanpiirakka's flavor, the pie itself I guess isn't super tasty. In my opinion, what makes it tasty is when you put some egg butter on top and eat it warmed. Still, it's a very humble pie if you look at the ingredients and I wouldn't call it a flavor bomb or anything. Probably the same thing could be said of most other Finnish dishes that come from the earlier times when ingredients were scarce.
  20. Now that I thought about it, a video will show the actual method much better than I could ever describe in words. The below clip seemed to show the technique of assembling that's said to be "the right one". Make them as thin as possible (with the help of pasta machine if you wish!), slather a tablespoon of porridge on it, and then go do the finger work (the lady seems to have done those a few times before, judging from the speed at which she goes). Bake in as high temperature as you got, brush with melted butter and rest under a cloth to soften. And, in my opinion, eat with a mix of hard boiled eggs and butter, aka egg butter (munavoi)! Also, don't put the dough into fridge as it'll harden, so use plenty of flour to avoid sticking. And the dough could be made even with 10 rye to 3 wheat, or something like 3 rye to 2-3 wheat. I imagine the more rye you put in there, the closer you get to what it originally was. Happy to help if I can!
  21. I don't know how many Finns there are on eGullet but I'll respond as one of them. Pulla, or nisu, or korvapuusti, whatever you call them, are very Finnish indeed. I think a basic recipe would be something like 50g yeast, 500g milk, 2 eggs, 170g sugar, 8g salt, 7g cardemom, 1000g wheat flour, 200g butter, with a filling made of 100g butter, 85g sugar, 14g cinnamon. Dough made as any other similar dough, and after rising, rolled into flat disks where you put the filling and roll them up, and cut. For karjalanpiirakka, a recipe would be for example 200g cold water, 4g salt, 135g rye flour, 160g wheat flour, 25g butter. For the rice/porridge, 400g water, 340g porridge rice, 1600-1800g whole milk, 6g salt. There's probably a certain way of getting the pies together. If someone is interested in the method I can try find it out. There are quite a few Finnish dishes that are great, though I'm not sure how originally Finnish they are (but are generally thought of as traditional here). Graavilohi (cured salmon, together with ruisleipä/rye bread), leipäjuusto (bread cheese), mämmi (Easter time dessert, quite distinct flavor!), mustikkapiirakka (blueberry pie, a childhood favorite), hernekeitto (pea soup with pork, every Wednesday in the army with pannukakku).
  22. Yes, the one mentioned in the post was relatively low fat even though it was all whole milk and the brittle had fat in it too. Alcohol is one thing I haven't yet tried adding to the ice cream although that has been on the list for a while. I'm still wondering (I think you are but not 100% sure if I can read that from what you wrote ) whether you are able to scoop for example those ice creams that have alcohol in them, straight out of the freezer after being there for +1 day? Or is it "normal" that after it has been in the freezer for little longer you need to keep it in room temp for 15mins or so and then scoop?
  23. EsaK

    Dinner 2016 (Part 2)

    For some reason, posted the above twice.
  24. EsaK

    Dinner 2016 (Part 2)

    I've been looking for some time now what people here put up, and it's great looking food time after time. After getting a pasta machine a month ago, I finally managed to make pasta that I was happy with (nice texture, not clumping together after cooking etc). Combined with panfried onions with balsamic vinegar, roasted carrots, crispy onions and mozzarella.
  25. A very basic question that I've been wondering after dozens of attempts at ice cream with various ingredients and techniques. Are there some basic elements that need to be in place for one to make ice cream that is scoopable right out of the freezer? For example I just made one batch from Gluten-Free Flour Power book, basically a nut brittle and an ice cream base of whole milk and guar gum. It looked nice when out of the ice cream machine, but then when it had sit in the freezer overnight it's like a block of ice that needs to be in roomtemp for 15min or so to get any kind of scoops. The same thing has happened with basically all batches with different recipes.
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