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Xanthippe

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Everything posted by Xanthippe

  1. That seems to be the case . . . Must the restaurant be in SF? I ask because down here in our neck of the woods (Santa Cruz county), the worst-kept secret in great seafood places is Phil's Fish Market and Eatery in Moss Landing -- not to be confused with Moss Beach. Excellent, fresh seafood in a very casual venue, with a vast selection of dishes served in ample (read take-home containers!) portions. They do everything well, and I'm always happy to see one of my personal favorites, sand dabs, on the menu. Perfectly sauteed, they melt in one's mouth. I really can't recommend this place highly enough. It's going to be a glorious weekend, perfect for a drive down the coast and a visit to Phil's.
  2. Oooh, how could I forget about Yabbies?!? I concur with Seattleguy: much bang for the buck. But I'll still recommend Hayes Street Grill as well . . .
  3. Well, it seemed only fittin'. In *that* case, then, I'll take whatever you feel is "fittin'" enough to swap! As for Mama's Pimento Cheese recipe, she has given me her maternal permission to pass it on to you. You'll duly receive it tomorrow (Friday), 'cuz I'm woefully behind the eight ball at the moment. Today, we experienced a #$%!&*!??# power outage lasting almost 8 hours; an unamed "eediot" plowed headlong into the power pole that feeds our entire neighborhood, flattening a row of mailboxes in the process! Needless to say, I've got a bunch of tasks ahead of me before I can call it a night. Oh, and I've decided I need a gas stove . . .
  4. Well, it seemed only fittin'. In *that* case, then, I'll take whatever you feel is "fittin'" enough to swap! As for Mama's Pimento Cheese recipe, she has given me her maternal permission to pass it on to you. You'll duly receive it tomorrow (Friday), 'cuz I'm woefully behind the eight ball at the moment. Today, we experienced a #$%!&*!??# power outage lasting almost 8 hours; an unamed "eediot" plowed headlong into the power pole that feeds our entire neighborhood, flattening a row of mailboxes in the process! Needless to say, I've got a bunch of tasks ahead of me before I can call it a night. Oh, and I've decided I need a gas stove . . .
  5. Goodness, Jaymes, you needn't feel you have to reciprocate with a " . . . secret recipe or two" in exchange for that of Mama's Pimento Cheese! And besides, her recipe's not really secret -- just call it "closely-guarded." I've always suspected she wants to make sure it doesn't wind up in the hands of some unscrupulous Yankee. That being said, she hasn't gotten back to me as yet (left a phone message and also sent an e-mail), but as soon as she does I'll let you know. That's a promise . . .
  6. Hayes Street Grill for simple, perfectly grilled fish; I believe Patricia Untermann still owns it and keeps a close eye on the kitchen. Don't know if lobster is available, but I'd imagine crab should be what with Dungeness season being in full swing.
  7. I would absolutely love Mama's recipe for that pimento cheese. Any chance??? Hey, Jaymes, I gotta check with Mama first. The recipe is one her own mama perfected, and she's pretty picky about its distribution. But I'm sure I can sweet-talk her into sharing it . . .
  8. Xanthippe

    Recipes

    I intend to try this recipe tonight, even tho' I'm only half-Scottish. I've had a hellish day. Alas, however, I can't seem to find any Staropramen locally; guess I'll resort to some Sierra Nevada stout. I'll look for that cream of haggis soup recipe come May . . .
  9. Omigosh, this was mine as well (although my copy is a First Edition, copyright 1957 -- I'm a tad bit, er, older than you)!! I still have it, and don't think I could bear to part with it; the dated photos always take me back to childhood, as do many of the recipes, so representative of the food trends of the time. I think I remember making Eggs in a Frame first, which I love even now, although I don't use balloon white bread these days. Then it was either the Velvet Crumb Cake with Broiled Coconut Icing or the Hot Fudge Pudding (still wicked good after all these years!). Stayed away from the Fruit Gelatin, however; couldn't stand the stuff even as a child. Thanks for evoking such great memories . . .
  10. I'm a recent convert to egullet.com, and have just now stumbled on this thread. Although I'm a native Californian (still living in said Golden State), I was born of and raised by a Southern mother who instilled in me and my two sisters a deep appreciation of all things Southern -- especially good manners and the food. She'd return from visits back home with an extra suitcase (shipped empty, for the purpose of filling!) laden with goodies not available here such as Duke Mayonnaise, her beloved Blenheim ginger beer, and sourwood honey. I miss her (she now lives in New Hampshire) and her cooking, but at least I have most of her recipes, including her ethereal Pimiento Cheese. I love you, Mama . . .
  11. Indeed, it does. I'd forgotten about that housemade focaccia . . .
  12. Xanthippe

    Recipes

    Ditto here. My last such experiment involved an attempt to duplicate the piquant Romesco Sauce served at a local eatery (recipe a "family secret," according to the owners). I did a Google search and came up with some 400 hits. After perusing a number of the recipes, I narrowed my choices down to four, took bits and pieces from two of them, and ended up with a version that most who have tasted find even better than the original. Such is my therapy . . .
  13. Xanthippe

    Avocadoes

    Where do you live, nervousnelli? Here in central California, I'm lucky enough to get a number of varieties in season, especially if I shop at our local farmers' markets. One vendor in particular has the Fuertes you speak of, as well as Haas, the big and buttery Reeds, and my personal favorite, Gwens. This thread has me drooling copiously all over my keyboard . . .
  14. Thanks muchly, Jinmyo! Pleased as punch to be here . . .
  15. As do I, the only exception being the use of fine sea salt (3/4 tsp. per 1 1/4# meat) sprinkled on the meat and left to sit (covered, in the fridge) overnight. The actual method: Chef Judy Rogers' of Zuni Cafe fame. Simple in the extreme, and the best darned hamburger going. Start with a well-marbled piece of chuck steak (@ 1 1/4# for two hungry people). Trim the meat of any discoloration, but do *not* trim any fat (Julia Child is right!). Cut the meat into long thick "ropes," place the meat in a bowl, and toss with the sea salt. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Up to 5 or 6 hours before cooking, set up a meat grinder with 1/16 inch holes. Grind the meat twice, which results in a tender texture and even distribution of the salt throughout the meat. Shape the ground meat into thick patties, taking care not to warm the meat in your hands. Make sure the burgers are at room temperature before cooking. In nice weather, I cook the burgers on the Weber; in our California "winter," I use my trusty Lodge cast-iron grill pan. In either case, the burgers are cooked medium-rare, and always come out moist and delicious. I know, I know -- I'd always thought that salting meat before cooking would render it dry, but it just ain't so in this case.
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