Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Sentiamo

Arepas on my mind....

Recommended Posts

Can anyone give me some TNT ideas for homemade Arepas? I am so looking forward to trying them after having some long convo's with a friend in Venezuela.

OK, so he has given me his ideas for fillings, and even how to make arepa's from scratch using whole white corn kernels since I cannot buy the dough mix here. But, I am also having trouble sourcing white milled/cracked corn to begin with. It seems every other nationality has migrated to NZ BUT Venezuelans. Dammit!!

Has anyone ever made them from anything other than white corn?

Your filling ideas?

Empanada's too. :biggrin:

Lyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I wish I could help you. I really don't know how to make them from scratch; they sell masa even in the regular grocery store here.

If you can find white corn, <a href="http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/masa.htm">here</a> is a page that shows you how to do it.

My dad grew up in Venezuela and one of the highlights of weekend mornings for me growing up was a delicious arepa breakfast. My favorite way is to scoop out most of the soft inner dough, spread a little butter on, and fill with eggs, bacon, cheese, and a little fresh salsa. We had them occassionally for dinner as well, sometimes with carne asada.

Mmmm...I think I may have to dig that masa out of my freezer and make myself a comforting brunch...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the recipe I use:

http://www.recipes4us.co.uk/Cooking%20by%2...20%20Arepas.htm

I usually make the basic arepas, but sometimes add Queso Fresco. Very much like the "Hoecake" made in the Southern United States in the plain version.

I cannot help you get Masa Harina in New Zealand, however, unless you want to mail order, but that is SO expensive. Perhaps you can PM me and we could work something out if you are interested in making from the flour instead of grinding your own corn? There is a hispanic market literally within walking distance, and Masa Harina or Maseca or even rice flour are dirt cheap.

I think the pupusa usually uses rice flour instead of corn flour. I'll have to check with one of my neighbors.


Edited by annecros (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to make sure you get what you need for arepas, you do not want masa harina, you want masa arepa. The most common brand is P.A.N., although Goya makes one too. I think the Goya is yellow.

Here's a thread that helps explain.

Click.

-L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to make sure you get what you need for arepas, you do not want masa harina, you want masa arepa.  The most common brand is P.A.N., although Goya makes one too.  I think the Goya is yellow.

Here's a thread that helps explain.

Click.

-L

Interesting. I do know that harina simply means flour, and masa means corn. I do know that P.A.N. is a brand name that makes baking mixes in a great variety, and I mean HUGE, like a whole endcap of various pouch type baking mixes and flours for various applications. Sort of like Betty Crocker or Martha White. I do know that Goya makes masarepa in both white and yellow:

http://www.latinmerchant.com/productdetail...ProductID=F0009

Once again, the big differences in the product appear to be branding, it is all masa harina as far as I can tell. Will have to read the fine print on the bags in the future. Will have to check in with my Venezuelan neighbor, who came here 20 years ago and is 60 years old, and see if she can help.

Sounds like the original poster has a very good source for masa information and the proper preparation of an arepa that she trusts.

Beginning to sound like the great grits/polenta debate.

:biggrin:

OOPS. My bad. I see that "Masa" actually means Hominy, not corn. So anything with Masa in the prefix is produced from hominy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masa

http://www.epicurious.com/cooking/how_to/f...y/entry?id=3440

It sounds like our original poster would prefer to make fresh Masa from dried hominy. I can also pick up bags of dried, cracked hominy around the corner.

Yep, sounding more and more like the great grits/polenta debate.


Edited by annecros (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Once again, the big differences in the product appear to be branding, it is all masa harina as far as I can tell.

It really isn't all the same. Masa harina is not precooked. Masa arepa is. Here's another link to the food network.

Arepa recipe and explanation of masa arepa.

I think part of the confusion is that some people who do not have access to arepa flour substitute masa harina. Corn cakes made from masa harina will be delicious, but they will not be authentic arepas. You need this product or one similar:

Harina PAN at Latinmerchant.com.

Another source of confusion is that both maize products tend to be translated as "corn flour" or "corn meal." Hope this helps.

-L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Once again, the big differences in the product appear to be branding, it is all masa harina as far as I can tell.

It really isn't all the same. Masa harina is not precooked. Masa arepa is. Here's another link to the food network.

Arepa recipe and explanation of masa arepa.

I think part of the confusion is that some people who do not have access to arepa flour substitute masa harina. Corn cakes made from masa harina will be delicious, but they will not be authentic arepas. You need this product or one similar:

Harina PAN at Latinmerchant.com.

Another source of confusion is that both maize products tend to be translated as "corn flour" or "corn meal." Hope this helps.

-L

Well, I am still confused. I do know that "masa al instante para whatever" is definitely a premix with additives like flour or salt and sometimes milk solids or levening, depending upon what it is designed for, and anything that is made from hominy is "cooked" by definition. Therefore, if masa is hominy dough, it is all precooked. The nixtamalization process cooks the corn, I know enough about lye to know that for a fact. Lye and moisture create intense heat. Check out soapmaking.

Will have to dig up an old guy in Venezuela who grows and grinds his own masa, I suppose. I'm sure he has a web site somewhere!

:biggrin:

My neighbor was out today, but will try to catch up with her tomorrow. She really is a lovely and very knowledgable lady, and we trade recipes all the time. The first time I sent over collards and hoecake, she asked me how I got my arepa so thin and crispy! If she doesn't know, she will tell me. But if she does know, there will be no discussion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I am still confused.

Did you have time to read the thread I linked above? It really does help. Cal, or slaked lime, is not used to make masa arepa but is used to make masa harina. Masa arepa is precooked with heat. The Venezuelans on the thread explain it very well. It also links to a nice blog entry.

I work in Venezuela and will be there again in February. Areperias here I come!

-L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I am still confused.

Did you have time to read the thread I linked above? It really does help. Cal, or slaked lime, is not used to make masa arepa but is used to make masa harina. Masa arepa is precooked with heat. The Venezuelans on the thread explain it very well. It also links to a nice blog entry.

I work in Venezuela and will be there again in February. Areperias here I come!

-L

OK, I think I am now getting it now. Reread the thread again, and did a little more research.

The dried, cracked corn (not hominy) is boiled and ground for the Masa, or dough, for the traditional arepa preparation. Masa Harina is a flour made from hominy, the cooking and hulling process being accomplished with Lye. Masarepa is comparable to "quck" grits, in that the corn (not hominy) has been boiled and ground, then dehydrated again for a quicker version of Masa that rehydrates to accomplish the masa for the arepa. So, logically, the flavor and texture would be closer to cornmeal or heart grits (which are not ground from hominy) than they would the typical grits. Amazing the places a kernal of corn goes to!

I guess that would explain why Mariposa associated my hoecake with the arepa flavor, as I use stone ground corn meal from a grist mill. In my cooking, I have found only a subtle differnce in using cornmeal for hoecake and masa harina for arepas. The biggest difference seems to be in moisture content of the finished product. When Mariposa is back and rested I intend to spend some time with her. She lives with her elderly husband, and loves to talk about her home with others. She has the most amazing array of mortars and pestels, and I guess I can see why! I think her daughter and SIL run a restaurant in the area somewhere.

Thanks, lperry. I learn something new every day. Have a big, fat loaded arepa for me!

:biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to make sure you get what you need for arepas, you do not want masa harina, you want masa arepa.  The most common brand is P.A.N., although Goya makes one too.  I think the Goya is yellow.

note that goya does make a masarepa blanca, too. i haven't seen it around here but it's on their website. i don't know if that's available in new zealand, but it does exist and may be more widely distributed than PAN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...