Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
SobaAddict70

Fettucine al caviale e ricotta

Recommended Posts

I'm posting this recipe here for the benefit of cabrales (the egg connection) and others who may be interested. This is a rich dish, and not something I make very often, but it's worth the effort and expense. The original version of this dish was at One Magnificent Mile, a restaurant in Chicago, where it was made with black and yellow fettucine, and accompanied by beluga caviar.

The recipe comes from "Lorenza's Pasta" by Lorenza De'Medici (yes, THAT family) (1996, Clarkson Potter, page 111).

1 scant c. fresh ricotta cheese

1 T. vodka

1/2 c. double heavy cream

Salt

1 quantity fresh egg pasta, cut into either fettucine or taglierini

4 T. black caviar

Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Combine the ricotta and vodka and keep warm in a double boiler over hot, but not boiling, water. Heat the cream in a pan and add a little salt. Add salt and the fettucine to the boiling water and cook until the water comes back to the boil and the fettucine float to the top. Drain and toss with the cream in a warmed serving dish. Sprinkle with the ricotta mixture and the caviar, and serve immediately.

Serves 4.

SA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SA70, nice recipe. Do you make your own pasta? If so, do you roll and cut it by hand, or do you use a machine? What purpose is served by the vodka in this recipe? Did you find it to be a meaningful ingredient?


Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I very rarely make my own pasta (when I do, I usually roll it out by hand). I'm thinking of getting a pasta machine but don't know where to begin or what model to get. I'm interested in the hand-cranked versions but am unsure as to the cost, best type/brand/model/make, or where to get the most reliable machines, so any advice would be appreciated.

Vodka serves primarily as a flavor enhancer, supposedly. I'm not really sure why its there -- although you'll note that the sauce is barely cooked, so the alcohol probably doesn't burn off as normal. Its like pasta with tomato and vodka sauce. I suppose there's a hint of flavor lent by the vodka in that sauce, but otherwise I don't get the point.

SA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, SA70. I'm both too stubborn and not smart enough to get a pasta machine, so I'm afraid I can't help you there. I'll be interested, though, to see if any recommendations turn up. Still, there's nothing better than egg pasta made entirely by hand.


Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vodka serves primarily as a flavor enhancer, supposedly.  I'm not really sure why its there -- although you'll note that the sauce is barely cooked, so the alcohol probably doesn't burn off as normal.

Soba -- Agreed re: the lack of evaporation. In Poland & Russia, caviar is sometimes taken with a shot of vodka. Perhaps the inspiration for the dish was that pairing. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hand cranked pasta makers can be bought quite cheaply and the strange thing is that making pasta is dead easy. Stupidly simple in fact. It is especially fun to make stuffed pasta ("pasti"?) and this is something that you can do with several people including kids. Recently I bought a "Chittarra" which is a box with lots of fine metal strings (hence "Guitar") for making pasta. This means that my wife can make the pasta sheets (she is better at this then me) with the pasta maker and I can cut the pasta into noodles at the same time. It is rather nice to be able to do this stuff together after coming bacj from work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I very rarely make my own pasta (when I do, I usually roll it out by hand).  I'm thinking of getting a pasta machine but don't know where to begin or what model to get.  I'm interested in the hand-cranked versions but am unsure as to the cost, best type/brand/model/make, or where to get the most reliable machines, so any advice would be appreciated.

Two differenet brands of pasta machines account for almost all pasta machines sold in the U.S.: imperia and atlas. They are basically identical; get whichever one you can find cheaper. They come with attachments for cutting the sheets into different widths. I even have a ravioli attachment that actually works quite well but you have to practice a little. Pasta machines with a motor are a waste of time (how hard is it to crank the handle?) There are maches that make the dough, but these I think are worthless too. Making dough is so easy. Most books instruct you to do it on a table top (put the flour on the table, make a well in the center of it, add the eggs, and gradually incorporate the flour into the eggs), but I find it much easier and neater to do it in a large bowl. Good luck! Fresh pasta is the best.


Rory Bernstein Kerber

www.RoryKerber.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By haresfur
      I found this article about arancino/arancina really interesting
       

    • By jennyandthejets
      I'll be in Naples for a few days next month and I wanted to try something traditional, and my friend recommended trying parmigiana. She said she loved it, but the problem is that she ate it at her Italian friend's house, and I won't be able to have that exact parmigiana. So, I did some research online and found a few restaurants that have good ratings and are serving allegedly great eggplant casserole. This place is 4 stars rated, but people seem not to agree whether the parmigiana is good or not.... On the other hand, this place has a great rating, appears when searching for the parmigiana, but nobody seems to write about it in their reviews. Finally, this one is said to have the best parmigiana in Naples (or in the world, for that matter), and I wanted to know if anyone had the so-called world's best?
      I would really appreciate if you could help me make the decision. Looking forward to your advice!

    • By alacarte
      I recently took a trip to Northern Italy, and was delighted to find that the cappuccino everywhere was just wonderful, without exception. Smooth, flavorful, aromatic perfect crema, strong but not too strong.
      Aside from the obvious answer (duh, Italians created cappuccino ), what makes Italian capp so fantastic, and how do I duplicate the effect here?
      I'm wondering if it's the water, the way the coffee is ground or stored, the machines used....I'm baffled.
      Also noticed that the serving size tended to be smaller than what I'm used to -- i.e. a small teacupful vs. a brimming mug or Starbucks supersize. Not sure why that is either.
      Grazie mille for any insight on this!
    • By Modernist Cuisine Team
      The Modernist Cuisine team is currently traveling the globe to research pizza and different pizza styles for our next book Modernist Pizza.  Nathan and the team will be in São Paulo and Buenos Aires soon. We'd love hear from the eGullet community—what pizzerias should they visit while they're there? You can read more about our next book Modernist Pizza here. Thanks in advance, everyone! 
    • By scordelia
      My article was published (my first one!)! Hooray! And I do have some Florentine restaurant recommendations including the new Osteria del Pavone which is amazing--lampredotto ravioli is now a thing and it must be tried.
       
      http://www.classicchicagomagazine.com/florence-in-winter/
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...