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Rebel Rose

Anti-Terroir

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I am a firm believer in terroir and the importance of site. But sometimes, when I hear arguments claiming that the proximity of eucalyptus trees creates eucalyptus aromas in wine--either through the soil or airborne oils--my irreverent sense of humor takes over and I just can't help but wonder . . . .

Our neighbors are putting in lavender fields immediately to the north of us. Will that be good for the syrah? What about the zin?

My field garden is between the zin and syrah lots. I was going to plant elephant garlic this fall. Thoughts?

Every spring between rains we spray the soil in the zinfandel lot with fish emulsion. Maybe not a good idea?

If eucalyptus oils coating the grapes produce eucalyptus flavors, what will bird poop produce?

:shock::wink:


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Mary Baker

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I am a firm believer in terroir and the importance of site. But sometimes, when I hear arguments claiming that the proximity of eucalyptus trees creates eucalyptus aromas in wine--either through the soil or airborne oils--my irreverent sense of humor takes over and I just can't help but wonder . . . .

Our neighbors are putting in lavender fields immediately to the north of us. Will that be good for the syrah? What about the zin?

My field garden is between the zin and syrah lots. I was going to plant elephant garlic this fall. Thoughts?

Every spring between rains we spray the soil in the zinfandel lot with fish emulsion. Maybe not a good idea?

If eucalyptus oils coating the grapes produce eucalyptus flavors, what will bird poop produce?

:shock:  :wink:

I think we call those flavour profiles "complex" :biggrin: Seriously though I'm a firm believer in terrior although with modern winemaking today it is harder to notice.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Vancouver


Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

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[...]Seriously though I'm a firm believer in terrior although with modern winemaking today it is harder to notice.

What about modern winemaking makes it harder to notice terroir?


Michael aka "Pan

 

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[...]Seriously though I'm a firm believer in terrior although with modern winemaking today it is harder to notice.

What about modern winemaking makes it harder to notice terroir?

With flying winemakers traversing the globe many terrior influences have been overshadowed by wine making. If a Merlot in British Columbia tastes like an Australian Shiraz or a Californian Chardonnay tastes like Meursault where's the terrior? Michel Rolland is a typical example of a winemaker that has used great winemaking skills to cloak the terrior of regionality or even varietals. Not a bad thing ; but text book examples of classic regions is becoming more and more harder to define.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Vancouver


"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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In many ways this is true, but I think generic styling applies most often to large productions. Limited productions are more likely to reflect terroir and/or individuality as the winemakers have less concern about having to sell tens of thousands of cases.


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Mary Baker

Solid Communications

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If eucalyptus oils coating the grapes produce eucalyptus flavors, what will bird poop produce?

:shock:  :wink:

Well... bird poop contains high levels of phosphate, so I'd say, more wine!

But, given the aromatic nature of eucalyptus oils--I'm talking pedantic chemical aromaticity, I don't think much eucalyptus oil will be found on the grapes, and things like that percolate down through soil, not horizontally.

Essentially, I think it's a "pastoral scene" marketing move. Feh. Plant your elephant garlic and be happy. Your wines will not suffer. Actually, they'll probably be better as garlic makes people happy, and happy vintners are better vintners.


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I am a firm believer in terroir and the importance of site. But sometimes, when I hear arguments claiming that the proximity of eucalyptus trees creates eucalyptus aromas in wine--either through the soil or airborne oils--my irreverent sense of humor takes over and I just can't help but wonder . . . .

Our neighbors are putting in lavender fields immediately to the north of us. Will that be good for the syrah? What about the zin?

My field garden is between the zin and syrah lots. I was going to plant elephant garlic this fall. Thoughts?

Every spring between rains we spray the soil in the zinfandel lot with fish emulsion. Maybe not a good idea?

If eucalyptus oils coating the grapes produce eucalyptus flavors, what will bird poop produce?

:shock:  :wink:

I don't know anyone anywhere who does not believe in " terroir and the importance of site."

I do know that there is a lot of confusion over how terroir is manifested in the taste of wine.

Anyway, for a long time it was believed that the eucalyptus notes in Martha's Vineyard cabs were the result of the proximity to a eucalyptus tree (or trees).

Unfortunately, eucalyptus notes are present in a lot of wines that are made from grapes grown nowhere near a eucalyptus tree.

Though I often take such assertions from winemakers with a large grain (Maldon) salt--Bob Foley once remarked that there were discernable flavors in some of his wines from some type of Northern California native weed that was present in the vineyards. (I forget the specifics).

There is much evidence to support the impact of sunlight (site, elevation etc) as well as the drainage properties of the soil and subsoil on vineyards and their wines. There is much less to support the notion that the mineral content (or any other content) of the soils is "tasted" in wine.

Terroir is a fascinating and important subject. It is unfortunate that it has become fodder for arguments about "new world" and "old world" polemics and other silliness.

As for growing that elephant garlic near the grapes--well how about planting a eucalyptus tree near some other grapes and making a minty after dinner wine to counter the "effects" of your

first wine!!!!

There's a great marketing idea here!!!!!

:laugh:

--

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Hi,

I thought that we were at war with the terroirists.

Seriously, do modern vinification techniques (ie, ceramic rocket fuel filters) strip the earthiness from our wines? I think probably.

Do wine tasters wax eloquently for their own ears or as a reaction to the wine? DUH!!

I once attended a tasting of 5 fully matured first growths and searched without success for the violets in the Ch. LaTour. Many of the expert tasters experienced the violets AND insisted that the musty aromas of the Ch. Margaux and Petrus were quickly receeding. They were not improving a whit.

After a little reading, I realized that the two wines were clearly "corked" but none of the eonophiles were willing to admit this fact. I have since learned that person who can not taste a "corked" wine is either the purchaser or host.

I do miss a little dusty taste in a glass of St. Emilion, but alas the budget cannot afford that pleasure.

Tim

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