Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
silverbrow

Jewish Paris

Recommended Posts

I'm interested in doing a bit of a cultural tour around those bits of Paris that either have historically had Jewish communities or currently have a large Jewish population. I'd particularly like to draw on this Board's knowledge for kosher restaurants and kosher food shops. I'm also interested to know in which arrondisment the majority of kosher shops/restaurants are. I know historically the Marais had a large Jewish population but my impression (perhaps incorrectly) is that this is no longer the case, although some restaurants and shops remain.

All help gratefully received.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I went to Paris, I read this for a great deal of insight and historical background:

the article from the Jewish Virtual Library ..

but as to how updated the recent information actually is, I am still uncertain.

While I was in Paris about two years ago, I visited Chez Goldenberg on the rue de Rosiers, a popular spot for spicy kosher-style cooking, and was pleased with the food as well as the ambiance.

more on the area of the Marais and the Jewish population there

Jews still crowd the rue des Rosiers, rue de Temple, and rue de Turenne. Despite this emptiness, the Marais continues to thrive. It is a living symbol of the contradictions, ironies, and continuity of Jewish existence in the 20th century.

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm interested in doing a bit of a cultural tour around those bits of Paris that either have historically had Jewish communities or currently have a large Jewish population.  I'd particularly like to draw on this Board's knowledge for kosher restaurants and kosher food shops.  I'm also interested to know in which arrondisment the majority of kosher shops/restaurants are.  I know historically the Marais had a large Jewish population but my impression (perhaps incorrectly) is that this is no longer the case, although some restaurants and shops remain.

All help gratefully received.

Yes, the Marais (4th) is where to go. There are 2 Goldenberg's, one in the 4th and the other is in the 17th. Timeout also lists l'As du Fallafel, Chez Marianne, Pitchi Poi, Les Ailes + Benittah. Emmanuel Rubin's Gourmet Paris also lists Le Train de Vie, Au Puits de Jacob, Hamman Cafe, l'Auberge de Belleville, Lotus de Nissan, Yunpana, Bistro Blanc, Natanya, Chez Jonatrhan, Mi-Va-Mi, Cafe des Psaumes, Chekel Cafe, + a la Libanese .

Except for Goldenberg's from which I've had take-out I cannot counsel you.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be sure not to miss the wonderful Museum of Judaic Art & History on 71, rue du Temple in the 4th. A beautiful restored "hotel", there are changing exhibits as well as a lot of Paris' Jewish heritage.

During WWII, France saved 2/3 of their Jewish population which was about 600,000 at the time. They did it quietly and individually with small heroic acts by common folks and the Résistance. It is an ongoing source of argument re France's treatment of Jews historically and today. This museum adds some important dimensions to the discussion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's great - thanks for all that advice. If anyone else has anything else to chip in please do so - the more info the better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Be sure not to miss the wonderful Museum of Judaic Art & History on 71, rue du Temple in the 4th.  A beautiful restored "hotel", 

Yes. And the new Museum of the Shoah, 17 rue Geoffroy l’Asnier in the 4th is also worth a visit as is the Memorial to the Deportation which is just at the SE end of the Ile de la Cite facing Notre Dame.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at l'as du felafel, on rue des rosiers, be sure to get the delux felafel, the one with everything. it comes with eggplant, the plain ones are not as gaudily delicious.

museums recommended really great. if you're on rue des rosier any time near a jewish holiday there is usually a very festival spirit. at chanukka chabadnicks sometimes give out little chanukkiot. and the bakery, oh what is the name, it starts with an S, makes special chanukka treats, and the women in there are a laugh.

you can get H and H bagels on rue de turenne, there are a couple of pleasant jewish cafes there. there is a kosher sushi place not far, but i forget the name. when i was there last, about 6-8 months ago, many of the young observant jews said they did not wear their kippot (and kept their tzitzes tucked into their trousers) as they were not safe on the street if they had obvious signs of being jewish. isn't that sad.

marlena


Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
there is a kosher sushi place not far, but i forget the name.

marlena

The sushi place is Yunpana, Nems at Lotus de Nissan, wide fire grilled stuff at l'Auberge de Belleville, sorry I didn't specify above.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most well-known bakery on the Rue des Rosiers is Florence Finkelstajn, famous for strudel, cheesecake, and "Pletzls". (Fabulous)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The most well-known bakery on the Rue des Rosiers is Florence Finkelstajn, famous for strudel, cheesecake, and "Pletzls".  (Fabulous)

This place is fabulous. I still remember gorging on their stuff.

You should check Sedar Olam out. It's a great resource for kosher restaurants and markets.

I've been told Juliette is excellent. Plus, if the Cine Citta in Surfside, FL is any indication, the original in Paris should be very good as well.


Edited by bloviatrix (log)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last Tuesday, in A Nous Paris, in the sidebar, they talk of Jewish cooking lessons at Alef-Bet a deli-Jewish product store at 25, rue Galande in the 5th, 01.40.18.17.22.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pletzls are beyond delicious. When returning home from Paris I always stop to get at least a half dozen for the plain. A pletzl with sweet butter and most any kind of cheese beats anything you can get on a plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
    • By liuzhou
      The rise and fall of French cuisine
       
      interesting read.
       
    • By pastrygirl
      There are two local grocery stores here who I'd like to try to sell chocolate to but they have policies forbidding GMO soy,  Soy lecithin is allowed only if organic or certified non-GMO. 
       
      I use a lot of Felchlin, some Valrhona, a little Cacao Barry. The only mention of GMOs I've found from Felchlin is this note in a brochure: GMO absence:  Felchlin fulfills current legislative requirements regarding GMO absence.  All Felchlin products comply with the Swiss Regulation and the European Council Regulation related to genetically modified organisms in food and feed.
       
      Does anybody know what those requirements are?  Is anything European going to be GMO-free?  Or labeled above some %?
       
       
    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...