Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Risotto


sadistick
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ok, I made a thread about salad dressings, and it seemed to be a real flop, so before i start another long post, i wanted to hear what all your interests in Risotto's are, how fluent you are in this category, and if people want to hear some recipe's, and/or share some!

Risotto's are one of mine, and my families favourite dishes, as you can make so many varieties, and if you do it right, the flavours can be extremely bold, and delicious.

So lets see what the interest level is before I pour my heart and soul out :raz:

Cheers

-Justin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty straightforward for risottos since I typically use them as the bed that I serve other things on.

Basically Arborio rice or pearl barley, minced échalottes, duck fat, chicken broth (chicken and water, no aromatics), white wine, ground pepper, butter and either pecorino or parmigiano to finish. I've taken to using Viognier for the wine, but it'll depend on what whites I have on hand.

I have made slight variations of this by also adding:

- fresh peas and prosciutto

- sautéed wild mushrooms (with Patagonian Toothfish and port reduction)

- chives (KISS bison filet)

I did try Nick Nairn's razor clam risotto recipe from his "Island Harvest" series and cookbook, but the reception was lukewarm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This may get me shot - but we make risotto all the time - it's a favourite way to use up leftovers (should I duck now).

Arborio rice, sweet/Mayan onions, chicken stock, vermouth (if we have any), white wine/sherry (depending on subsequent ingredients) and then we let rip. A popular one was with swiss chard & leftover roast chicken. We always finish it with either parmesan or pecorino, we NEVER add cream. We also have never even thought of using pomegranate seeds ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arborio rice, sweet/Mayan onions, chicken stock, vermouth (if we have any), white wine/sherry (depending on subsequent ingredients) and then we let rip.  A popular one was with swiss chard & leftover roast chicken.  We always finish it with either parmesan or pecorino, we NEVER add cream.  We also have never even thought of using pomegranate seeds ...

Ah! someone knows about the surprise at The Glass House, but cream?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're a big fan of risottos in my house. The most common one I do is a mushroom one, with a touch of lemon. After that, pea and prosciutto, followed by crab and lemon. I recently began trying variations of butternut squash risotto (I think I'll be doing a version with the squash, bacon, and blue cheese this week to help chase away the cold weather blues).

The only thing is, I never feel like my risottos, which taste very good, are quite creamy enough. I don't know if I'm not adding enough liquid or if I've cooked it too fast - it's really very close to what I'd get in a restaurant, but one little thing seems to be slightly off. Anybody else have/had that problem and hopefully have some pointers?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I almost worship Alain Ducasse's risotto recipes. One trick he commonly uses in all of them is, in addition to grated parmiggiano and butter, to add whipped cream as a finishing touch to create a light and airy risotto.

The best recipe i have come across so far is Ducasse's tomato risotto which calls for a heavy ladle of "tomato compote" to be added just before the rice is cooked. Zucchini slices sauteed in butter with roasted tomato quarters or "petals" are also folded in the rice as garnish.

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I will share one of our favourite risotto recipies, and see how you folks like it, if there is interest I will post more, I have many in my brain :raz:

We actually will have risotto as a course, not just a starch on a plate....that being said, if you have it as a course, it has to have some great flavour, and be able to stand on its own.

Cherry Tomatoe rissoto w/young peccorino cheese

My beliefe that all good risotto's start with a well flavoured liquid, which is used to slowly cook the rice. What I will do for a cherry tomatoe risotto, is from all the saved fresh and/or frozen cherry tomatoes from the summer, make a sauce out of it, and then add a strong veg stock, which turns it in to a well flavoured soup - the only thing you want to leave out is too much salt, because as you use all this liquid, it will reduce, and it may become too salty after reduction.

My Risotto process:

Finely chop 1-2 shallots

Finely chop 1 clove of garlic

Finely chop 3 parsley stems (great flavour)

Add all this to EVOO/Butter - sautee till slightly golden or translucent.

The next step is crucial, you must toast your rice - add the arborio rice (the only rice IMO for risotto) while the pot is on HIGH heat, constantly stirring, until the rice becomes almost translucent, then deglaze with white wine...

After the alchohol has evaporated, you will need to slowly add the tomatoe stock (which should also be at a low simmer) until the rice is covered -

Repeat this process until the rice is tender, or to your desired cookness -

I then like to add a FRESH tomatoe flavour - I will then put in some oven dried, or if i have, wood oven smoked cherry tomatoes, and possibly some sun dried tomatoes - add a good chunk of peccorino cheese, and some parmegiano regiano, salt, pepper, put the lid on, let it 'rest' for 5 minutes, and serve!

Always a favourite of anyone who has it, such intense flavours, if you like tomatoes, you HAVE to try this one!

Cheers

-Justin

ps - If anyone has any risotto questions, please feel free, i would be happy to help!

Edited by sadistick (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're a big fan of risottos in my house.  The most common one I do is a mushroom one, with a touch of lemon.  After that, pea and prosciutto, followed by crab and lemon.  I recently began trying variations of butternut squash risotto (I think I'll be doing a version with the squash, bacon, and blue cheese this week to help chase away the cold weather blues).

The only thing is, I never feel like my risottos, which taste very good, are quite creamy enough.  I don't know if I'm not adding enough liquid or if I've cooked it too fast - it's really very close to what I'd get in a restaurant, but one little thing seems to be slightly off.  Anybody else have/had that problem and hopefully have some pointers?

We generally use vialone nano. It's not as easy to find as arborio, but I think it results in a creamier final product. Someone (sadistick...?) should do a side-by-side to see if there is a noticeable difference. You could include carnaroli too.

allison

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I LOVE risotto. Everything about it, actually. It's total comfort food, even making it, is a calming relaxing process, stir and taste...mmmm.

There's a great little cookbook, simply called Risotto, that has loads of great recipes. My copy is stained and well used, though I usually just make the basic recipe, and add whatever I feel like at the time.

Chicken and mushrooms are always at the top of the list, Butternut squash, sage and parmesan too.

I like to make pan fried risotto cakes with the leftovers. Quickly sauteed in butter until they are golden and crunchy on the outside, soft and creamy in the middle. They remind me of hash browns.

:raz: Pam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I will share one of our favourite risotto recipies, and see how you folks like it, if there is interest I will post more, I have many in my brain  :raz:

We actually will have risotto as a course, not just a starch on a plate....that being said, if you have it as a course, it has to have some great flavour, and be able to stand on its own.

Cherry Tomatoe rissoto w/young peccorino cheese

My beliefe that all good risotto's start with a well flavoured liquid, which is used to slowly cook the rice.  What I will do for a cherry tomatoe risotto, is from all the saved fresh and/or frozen cherry tomatoes from the summer, make a sauce out of it, and then add a strong veg stock, which turns it in to a well flavoured soup - the only thing you want to leave out is too much salt, because as you use all this liquid, it will reduce, and it may become too salty after reduction.

My Risotto process:

Finely chop 1-2 shallots

Finely chop 1 clove of garlic

Finely chop 3 parsley stems (great flavour)

Add all this to EVOO/Butter - sautee till slightly golden or translucent.

The next step is crucial, you must toast your rice - add the arborio rice (the only rice IMO for risotto) while the pot is on HIGH heat, constantly stirring, until the rice becomes almost translucent, then deglaze with white wine...

After the alchohol has evaporated, you will need to slowly add the tomatoe stock (which should also be at a low simmer) until the rice is covered -

Repeat this process until the rice is tender, or to your desired cookness -

I then like to add a FRESH tomatoe flavour - I will then put in some oven dried, or if i have, wood oven smoked cherry tomatoes, and possibly some sun dried tomatoes - add a good chunk of peccorino cheese, and some parmegiano regiano, salt, pepper, put the lid on, let it 'rest' for 5 minutes, and serve!

Always a favourite of anyone who has it, such intense flavours, if you like tomatoes, you HAVE to try this one!

Cheers

-Justin

ps - If anyone has any risotto questions, please feel free, i would be happy to help!

That sounds fantastic! I'm definitely going to give that a go when I start to be overwhelmed by my garden's cherry tomato production this year! :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of rice do you use, and more importantly, where do you get it?

I have made risotto many times, but find varying outcomes with the different rices I use. This one brand (can't remember what it is) I get from the supermarket does not produce good risotto and I am on the hunt for a new kind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We generally use vialone nano. It's not as easy to find as arborio, but I think it results in a creamier final product. Someone (sadistick...?) should do a side-by-side to see if there is a noticeable difference. You could include carnaroli too.

It is interesting to also note the different schools of thought with risotto. Some may prefer reaching a certain level of creaminess by using the actual starch of the rice, some not. In this case, the type of rice used as you are suggesting will make a tremendous difference. I have seen people use a different approach by washing the rice thoroughly in cold water before cooking it and not stirring it often so that the rice grains release less starch. Creaminess in this case can be introduced with cream, butter and/or grated cheese (as in the Ducasse method I spoke about earlier). This method was also adopted by Thomas Keller. His risottos are just as extraordinary, they do retain some bite but the "cream" actually connecting the rice together is as light as air and not starchy at all.

I also generally tend to use vialone nano or carnaloni as opposed to arborio for those reasons.

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're a big fan of risottos in my house.  The most common one I do is a mushroom one, with a touch of lemon.  After that, pea and prosciutto, followed by crab and lemon.  I recently began trying variations of butternut squash risotto (I think I'll be doing a version with the squash, bacon, and blue cheese this week to help chase away the cold weather blues).

The only thing is, I never feel like my risottos, which taste very good, are quite creamy enough.  I don't know if I'm not adding enough liquid or if I've cooked it too fast - it's really very close to what I'd get in a restaurant, but one little thing seems to be slightly off.  Anybody else have/had that problem and hopefully have some pointers?

Aah, butternut squash. I occasionally do roast butternut squash, subsequently mashed with garlic (roasted with the squash) parmesan, nutmeg, toasted almonds & PEPPER just for the joy of putting the leftovers in a risotto 2 days later. Don't really need to add much else to it. Does anyone else try to stick to the "no more than three ingredients" (apart from the cheese, stock, etc.) rule I read (I think) in Marcella Hazan?

How fast are you cooking your risotto? I usually figure it's going to take about an hour from start to finish. That means literally from starting to cut up the sweet onions to stirring in the parmesan 5 minutes before it's ready. We're a little stuck for choices in terms of rice up here, but I've never had a risotto go dry - too wet once, but I know how I did that ... And as to the cream - it shows up in some recipes - go figure.

Edited by Viola da gamba (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of rice do you use, and more importantly, where do you get it?

I have made risotto many times, but find varying outcomes with the different rices I use. This one brand (can't remember what it is) I get from the supermarket does not produce good risotto and I am on the hunt for a new kind.

To all regarding rice -

I use strictly Arborio (SP?) rice - I believe this is the TRUE rice to make risotto with, I buy mine from a local italian grocery store, but I have seen it at the large supermarkets as well.

I did a quick google, and would like to give you all some sources, because I feel the rice type is very important, granted you can make risotto with any short grain rice, which contains higher amounts of starch, but this is the real deal:

http://www.bacchuscellars.com/food/rice/arborio_rice.htm

http://www.martinrice.com/arborio_rice.html

Again, ask your local grocery store if they stock, or if they can get it, its quite cheap, and becoming very popuparl.

Keep the questions coming - Next I think i will post my recipe for artichoke risotto...yummy

edit* - - Washing the rice, IMO, is ludacris, that takes away the KEY component to a risotto, the starch...again, IMO, putting cream in a risotto is sacralige, and pointless. Risotto by definition should be creamy on its own.

As well, in terms of cooking time, from the tiime i put my rice in the pot, till when its ready, with constant stirring, on high heat, adding liquid as needed, is about 14-18 minutes or so...

You guys have some great ideas, never tried roasted squash, i may have to make a soup out of that and use it as my liquid base...I find making a STRONG liquid base allows for a most flavourfull risotto. On the other hand, for my artichoke risotto, i use a veg stock for the liquid, and make a reduced artichoke sauce to add at the end, and thats where the flavour comes in.

All different ways, but saying cream in a risotto makes me cringe :raz:

Edited by sadistick (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make risotto all the time, it's also a leftover user in my house. Personally I think my risotto kicks butt! I serve it as a main. I always toast the rice, use white wine and finish with parm and butter. no cream here either!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, back to the rice. I notice arborio at the coop from Italy as well as some from California. Is one better than the other, or should one look for the rice that has the highest turnover in the market?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of rice do you use, and more importantly, where do you get it?

I have made risotto many times, but find varying outcomes with the different rices I use. This one brand (can't remember what it is) I get from the supermarket does not produce good risotto and I am on the hunt for a new kind.

technically you can use any grain, wehter it be wheat, barley rice or whatever. but i think to make it an actualy "risotto" you must, and i mean must use risotto. the term risotto hasbeen bastardized in north america as a marketing ploy. risotto is no longer a recipe. it's a method. on menus every whee you see barley risotto, wheat risotto, yam risotto, jasmine risotto. the one true risotto demands arborio

bork bork bork

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of rice do you use, and more importantly, where do you get it?

I have made risotto many times, but find varying outcomes with the different rices I use. This one brand (can't remember what it is) I get from the supermarket does not produce good risotto and I am on the hunt for a new kind.

technically you can use any grain, wehter it be wheat, barley rice or whatever. but i think to make it an actualy "risotto" you must, and i mean must use risotto. the term risotto hasbeen bastardized in north america as a marketing ploy. risotto is no longer a recipe. it's a method. on menus every whee you see barley risotto, wheat risotto, yam risotto, jasmine risotto. the one true risotto demands arborio

Sorry, I probably should have been more clear - I meant what kind of risotto rice - arborio, carnaroli, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definetly Arborio rice...its what the italians use, I also use 'superfino' arborio, but thats not required.

I was sent a message asking to elaborate on my veg stock...so here goes.

It all depends on my mood, sometimes I will roast my veggies prior to making stock, if i want a darker, more caramel stock, otherwise, just plop em in the pot...

Ingredients:

2-3 Onions, roughly chopped

2-3 fennel stalks chopped

3-5 carrots chopped

3-5 cellery sticks chopped

1 big bunch of parsley

2-3 bay leaves

leftover mushroom stalks

pepper corns

few cloves of garlic

white wine

I like to sautee all veggies till they get a tiny bit of color, then deglaze with wine, and add COLD water - cold is key - -

I will simmer with it UNCOVERED for anywhere up to 4-5 hours...

season at the end

Thats basically it...

Later today I will post my artichoke risotto recipe, thats a good one too!

Cheers

-Justin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer to let the creaminess come from the rice itself. Sometimes, I even skip the parm. I know, crazy. I look forward to trying your tomato recipe. It sounds wonderfully fresh. I'm into roasted squash, roasted asparagus and lemon, and pesto as add-ins these days. Not all once. I also like to toast the rice a little longer then typical to give a nutty flavor to it. That works really well with squash. I typically use arborio.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make risotto all the time, it's also a leftover user in my house. Personally I think my risotto kicks butt! I serve it as a main. I always toast the rice, use white wine and finish with parm and butter. no cream here either!

That's my basic method as well. ie. toast the rice, first liquid added is wine (white or red)-- finish with parm and butter at the end. I almost always include finely diced onions as well.

Tomato risottos are one my favorites. They are great to have on their own; also great as a side dish and also good for coating leftovers w/breadcrumbs the next day and frying up in patties. Great flavors to add to tomato risottos:

fennel (also good on its own)

basil

shrimp

pancetta

hot pepper

green olives

I've always used arborio rice so far. It would be fun to compare side by side with other Italian short grained rices also used in Italy for risotto as Ms. Melkor mentions-- carnaroli and vialone.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a little article on arborio, carnaroli, vialone nano and a rice I haven't heard of, baldo:

Italian short grained rice .

Though Italy grows about fifty different varieties of rice, there are four main types of Italian rice for risotto making.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only thing is, I never feel like my risottos, which taste very good, are quite creamy enough.  I don't know if I'm not adding enough liquid or if I've cooked it too fast - it's really very close to what I'd get in a restaurant, but one little thing seems to be slightly off.  Anybody else have/had that problem and hopefully have some pointers?

I always add a knob of butter and perhaps a little more stock into the risotto right after I take it off the heat... (per reading Marcella Hazan). When I was looking up the link to different risotto rices I came across this link--there's actually an Italian phrase for adding butter in at the end!

link

A Trio of Tips on Finishing Your Risotto

When the risotto seems done and ready to remove from the stove, add one last ladelful of broth. This gives the risotto something to "sip on" as it sits in the bowl for a minute or two before you eat, leaves it with a fine creamy texture, and keeps it from getting too dry.

In addition you may want to add a spoonful of butter at the last minute. This is known in Italian as the "mantecatura." As the butter melts it coats each grain of rice, yielding a richer, creamier risotto.

Finally, some folks recommend that you let the risotto rest for just a minute or two between its departure from the stove and the actual eating in order to let the flavors meld fully. But don't wait too long. This isn't a dish you can prepare in advance and then have sitting around. It's meant to be eaten right after it's cooked. Risotto rules the roost best when it's still steaming hot from the stove.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By daniel123456789876543
      I have been making pancetta for the first time. I have experience with the curing process doing things like bacon and cold smoked salmon in the past but this is the first time I have ever hanged anything.
       
      After a week of curing it has had 11 days  hanging so far (I was planning on taking it to 28 days hanging) Although I foolishly forgot to weigh it. 
      It smells really good like some awesome salami and the outer rim of the pancetta looks lovely and rich and dark.
      It was a recipe by Kuhlman in one of their charcuterie books.
      But when I inspected it today it had the mould growing on it as in the pics below. I have since scrubbed the mould off with white wine vinegar and returned it to the cellar. Is it wise to continue?
       
      Daniel
       
       
       


    • By shain
      Makes 40 cookies, 2 loaves. 
       
      50-60 g very aromatic olive oil
      80 g honey 
      120 to 150 g sugar (I use 120 because I like it only gently sweet) 
      2 eggs
      2 teaspoons of fine lemon zest, from apx 1 lemon 
      230 g flour 
      1 teaspoon salt 
      1 teaspoon baking powder 
      75 g lightly toasted peeled pistachios
      50 g lightly toasted almonds (you can replace some with pine nuts) 
      Optional: a little rosemary or anise seed
      Optional: more olive oil for brushing
       
      Heat oven to 170 deg C.
      In mixer (or by hand), mix oil, honey, sugar, lemon, egg and if desired, the optional spices - until uniform. 
      Separately mix together the flour, salt and baking powder. 
      Add flour mixture to mixer bowel with liquids and fold until uniform. Dough will be sticky and quite stiff. Don't knead or over mix. 
      Add nuts and fold until well dispersed. 
      On a parchment lined baking tray, create two even loaves of dough. 
      With moist hands, shape each to be rectangular and somewhat flat - apx 2cm heigh, 6cm wide and 25cm long. 
      Bake 25 to 30 minutes until golden and baked throughout, yet somewhat soft and sliceable. Rotate pan if needed for even baking. 
      Remove from tray and let chill slightly or completely. 
      Using a sharp serrated knife, gently slice to thin 1/2 cm thick cookies. Each loaf should yield 20 slices. 
      Lay slices on tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until complelty dry and lightly golden. 
      Brush with extra olive oil, if desired. This will and more olive flavor. 
      Let chill completely before removing from tray. 
      Cookies keep well in a closed container and are best served with desert wines or herbal tea. 
       
        
    • By psantucc
      My own recipe, though influenced by many sources.
      Santucci's Practical Torrone (Christmas Nougat)
      180g honey (½ cup)
      100g egg whites (2 eggs)
      350g sugar (1 ½ cups)
      50g water (2 tablespoons)
      450g (1 pound) roasted nuts
      5-10 drops orange oil
      2 sheets (8 ½” x 11”) Ostia (aka wafer, edible paper)
      Combine honey, water, and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Skim foam (if any is seen) off the honey when it reaches the boil.
      In a stand mixer, whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
      Cook the honey mixture to 280° F (137° C). Remove from the heat. With the mixer on high speed, slowly pour the mixture into the egg whites. Continue to whisk until volume has increased by about half and the mixture just starts to lose gloss – only about 5 minutes.
      Reduce the mixer speed and add the orange oil and nuts. When they are thoroughly mixed in, spread the resulting nougat over a sheet of Ostia. Try to cover the sheet as evenly as possible- the nougat is sticky and will make things difficult. When it is evenly covered, top with the other sheet of Ostia.
      Leave to cool and crystallize completely in the open air before cutting, preferably overnight.
      Note: I call this 'practical' Torrone because the recipe is made for home confectioners of reasonable skill to be able to easily understand what and how much to buy and what to do with it. The ingredient portions are biased for my country, the USA, but I saw no point in using English ounces for the weight-based version – those of us who prefer weight generally prefer it in grams.
      Tips and tricks:
      1.Keep nuts in a warm oven ( about 150° F / 65° C ) until you add them. Adding room temperature or colder nuts will reduce working time.
      2.Getting the nougat spread between sheets of Ostia is the trickiest part of the process. I use buttered caramel rulers on the outside edges of the bottom sheet, pour and press nougat in place, and then press the top layer on with an offset spatula. If you don't have caramel rulers, try spreading the nougat with an offset spatula, topping with the other sheet, and rolling with a pin to smooth. I advise against trying to cast the slab in any kind of fixed side pan, as the stickiness will make it very difficult to remove.
      3.Score the top layer of Ostia before cutting through. Once scored, a straight down cut with a Chef's knife works well. Cut into six 8 1/2” long bars and wrap in parchment or waxed paper to store, then cut into smaller rectangles to serve.
      4.There are many possible alternate flavorings. 1-10 Lemon oil or 1 t. (5 ml) vanilla or almond extract work well and are traditional flavors. Candied orange peel and/or orange zest can also be added.
      5.I use half pistachio and half almonds as the nuts. Hazelnuts (filberts) are also traditional. Any common nut should work.
      6.Ostia is available from confectionery suppliers. I get 8-1/2” x 11” sheets from www.sugarcraft.com under the name 'wafer paper'.
      This recipe is copyright 2009 by Patrick J. Santucci. Contact the author on eGullet under the username psantucc.
    • By Paul Bacino
      1 C Northern Beans soaked over-night in
      4-6C Water or Chxn Stock
      1/2 t Cayenne Pepper
      1//2 t Granulated garlic
      1 twig Dried oregano-- dried from last yr
      2 Bay
      pinch of salt ( yes ) and few pepper corns
      in the Morning; All into the Slow Cooker for 5 hrs. ( Crock Pot )
      I removed half the liquor and added chicken stock here back in . to this I added diced cooked Italian sausage about 1 whole .. simmer in a pot.. I transferred to... then add 1/2 head of shopped chicory ( curly endive ) finish cooking 15 mins
      cheers
      Most measurements again are from feel
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...