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Cheesetique


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I'll have to plead the fifth due to "grey market cheese dealings." You can always call over to the Rest. to see if it will be around on a particular evening.

Jarad C. Slipp, One third of ???

He was a sweet and tender hooligan and he swore that he'd never, never do it again. And of course he won't (not until the next time.) -Stephen Patrick Morrissey

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I'll have to plead the fifth due to "grey market cheese dealings." You can always call over to the Rest. to see if it will be around on a particular evening.

I had a feeling that's what the answer would be! :wink:

But the term "grey market cheese"..... kinda has a funny taste to it. Perhaps we can say that the raw milk cheese market is ripe for the food police to crack down on....or some such thing?

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Get thee to Cheesetique and buy the raw milk Pennsylvania Cheddar. Now. I'll wait. GO! Jill was really excited about this one, and with good reason!

Alright, in the interest of full disclosure, I went with the Four Star cheddar I had heard so much about here, and was quite pleased. Good call on that! Plus more Great Hill Blue, some reggiano, salami, and serrano.

Finally: Try the marinated dried yellow tomatoes on the plate on the front display case. Awsome.

-- Cheese Shogun

Matt Robinson

Prep for dinner service, prep for life! A Blog

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I was in this past Saturday and got the Cowgirl Creamery Mount Tam and a piece of Taleggio. Both were divine. It was my first trip to Cheesetique (I'd been in SC), and I have to say I was damned impressed -- the selection isn't as large as some I've seen, but it's quality, and it feels like the first time in ages I've bought two pieces of cheese together and not found that at least one of them smelled of cat pee when I got it home. Cheese-buying has equaled gambling for me for so long, I don't how how to approach cheeses that have been treated with such obvious love and care. It's a whole new experience.

Ms. Erber's my hero. :wub:

A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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Yeah, by the end of the week they'll probably be running low. Best day to go, I was told, is Tudsday, since they get their big delivery monday (and are closed monday). Was there last night and the place was busting at the seams.

Edited by Chef Shogun (log)

Matt Robinson

Prep for dinner service, prep for life! A Blog

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  • 4 months later...

Made it to Cheesetique for the first time today. What a great little store. Went a bit crazy, getting gorgonzola for a winter walnut salad, a bunch of 90-day pecorino, piave vecchio and castelmagno for a cheese course tomorrow when we're having friends over and some jamon serrano, manchego and toasted almonds for a light supper tonight. Also, now that I have proper pancetta, there is going to be much bucatini all'amatriciana on the table in my house from this day forth. Still, I'm a lightweight compared to some of the heavy users. Saw a well-known local sommelier laying in about five pounds of assorted good cheeses while I was there.

"Hey man. Those for the restaurant?"

"Nah. For me."

Respect.

"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

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Made it to Cheesetique for the first time today. What a great little store. Went a bit crazy, getting gorgonzola for a winter walnut salad, a bunch of 90-day pecorino, piave vecchio and castelmagno for a cheese course tomorrow when we're having friends over and some jamon serrano, manchego and toasted almonds for a light supper tonight. Also, now that I have proper pancetta, there is going to be much bucatini all'amatriciana on the table in my house from this day forth. Still, I'm a lightweight compared to some of the heavy users. Saw a well-known local sommelier laying in about five pounds of assorted good cheeses while I was there.

"Hey man. Those for the restaurant?"

"Nah. For me."

Respect.

Pop into FireFlies down the street for a hot, tasty Cheesetique Pizza for which

Mrs. Jill handpicks the cheese!

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  • 3 months later...

I'm having dinner with a friend at Evening Star. Hopefully I'll be able to get to Del Ray early enough to check out Cheesetique finally!

If you've been there lately (or Jill, if you're checking in), what's good and interesting lately?

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I'm having dinner with a friend at Evening Star.  Hopefully I'll be able to get to Del Ray early enough to check out Cheesetique finally!

If you've been there lately (or Jill, if you're checking in), what's good and interesting lately?

If Pepperton is in the case, it's a favorite of mine, FWIW. White stilton coated with cracked pepper. Mmmmmmmmmm.

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I'm having dinner with a friend at Evening Star.  Hopefully I'll be able to get to Del Ray early enough to check out Cheesetique finally!

If you've been there lately (or Jill, if you're checking in), what's good and interesting lately?

If she has Dovedale, don't miss it.

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ARGH, in the end I missed Cheesetique completely. Traffic in downtown DC was a nightmare - it took me about twenty minutes just to get to the 14th Street bridge. It made me appreciate my usual Metro routine.

By the time I got to Del Ray, it was 6:45, the appointed meeting time for dinner at Evening Star.

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Anyone else noticed Cheesetique's selling fancypants meats too now? I picked up some gorgeous Muscovy duck breasts last week (They. Were. Awesome.), and ogled lean lamb loins and racks to boot. In addition, I saw a few chickens, and noted that beef parts (short ribs, hanger, and... I dunno) were advertized, if not apparent.

I'm pretty much sunk. I either need to get a job, or never darken Cheesetique's door again. I could spend my last dime there and be a happy man.

A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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To Jill:

I make a risotto which incorporates Mauri gorgonzola dolce. The flavor of this is a bit more intense than other dolces that I have found. Two weeks ago I had two pounds of this cut for me from a block at the Wegmans in Sterling. When I brought it home, not having really looked at it earlier, I noted that the veining was very light, not at all like the pronounced, defined veins that are typically associated with this. After making the risotto, the flavor was much milder than what I would have otherwise anticipated. Note that I have made this particular risotto over 50 times over the past years with predictable results-other than this time, with its noticeably milder flavor.

Is the veining or absence of responsibe for this? Is it a rule of thumb that when buying dolce to look for pronounced veining as indicative of intense or depth of flavor? Is there an inference here that would apply to all veined cheese?

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To Jill:

I make a risotto which incorporates Mauri gorgonzola dolce.  The flavor of this is a bit more intense than other dolces that I have found.  Two weeks ago I had two pounds of this cut for me from a block at the Wegmans in Sterling.  When I brought it home, not having really looked at it earlier, I noted that the veining was very light, not at all like the pronounced, defined veins that are typically associated with this.  After making the risotto, the flavor was much milder than what I would have otherwise anticipated.  Note that I have made this particular risotto over 50 times  over the past years with predictable results-other than this time, with its noticeably milder flavor.

Is the veining or absence of responsibe for this?  Is it a rule of thumb that when buying dolce to look for pronounced veining as indicative of intense or depth of flavor?  Is there an inference here that would apply to all veined cheese?

Hi there Joe-

Blue cheese is a pretty simple beast - the more blue you see, the stronger the blue flavor (the "intensity" of blue cheese comes from the amount of mold present). For instance, check out the mold pockets of a nice mature Roquefort and compare to the delicate veining of a Gorgonzola Dolce. The latter is indeed a fabulous cooking cheese - it melts beautifully and its veininess (yes, I know that isn't an actual word) will blend nicely. I'm not a big fan of crunchy blue mold when I'm snacking or cooking with blues. That's why I like cooking with Dolce. The down side is that unless it's nicely mature, you're going to find a major lack in kick. Dolce is called "Dolce" for a reason - it is considered "sweet". If you get a mature one, you've hit the jackpot - great cooking texture, nice oomph. It sounds like the Dolce you picked up was really young. Probably great for snacking, but not quite ballsy enough for cooking.

In reference to your rule of thumb, when looking for a more sharp blue cheese, look for more blue. One of the best gorgonzolas I've had (and the one I carry in the shop) is from Belgioso in Wisconsin. Yes, I know it's not Italian. Yes, I know it's not "Artisan" - but man, is it good. Also, don't be afraid to try other creamy, mildish blues - some of the Americans are wonderful because they not only have nice blueing, but the "cheese" part adds interesting flavor and dimension.

Good luck with future risotto pursuits!

Edited by Jill Cheese Lady (log)

Jill Erber, Cheese Lady

Cheesetique Specialty Cheese Shop

Alexandria, VA

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Anyone else noticed Cheesetique's selling fancypants meats too now?  I picked up some gorgeous Muscovy duck breasts last week (They.  Were.  Awesome.), and ogled lean lamb loins and racks to boot.  In addition, I saw a few chickens, and noted that beef parts (short ribs, hanger, and... I dunno) were advertized, if not apparent.

I'm so glad you liked the duck - it's pretty rockin if I do say so myself.

Here's the list of what we currently have. If anyone has recommendations, please send them my way - I'm still trying to find the ideal cuts. We can also do special orders of just about anything. All of the meats are hormone-free, antibiotic-free, free range, and naturally fed.

Pork: Tenderloin, Double Chop (coming this week)

Beef: Cowboy Ribeye (looks like something Fred Flintstone would eat), NY Strip, Hanger Steak

Chicken: Whole

Duck: Double Breast

Lamb: Loin, Rack

Other: Kobe Beef Hotdogs (coming this week)

No joke, this is the best meat I've EVER tasted. Yum, yum, double yum.

Jill Erber, Cheese Lady

Cheesetique Specialty Cheese Shop

Alexandria, VA

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To Jill:

I make a risotto which incorporates Mauri gorgonzola dolce.  The flavor of this is a bit more intense than other dolces that I have found.  Two weeks ago I had two pounds of this cut for me from a block at the Wegmans in Sterling.  When I brought it home, not having really looked at it earlier, I noted that the veining was very light, not at all like the pronounced, defined veins that are typically associated with this.  After making the risotto, the flavor was much milder than what I would have otherwise anticipated.  Note that I have made this particular risotto over 50 times  over the past years with predictable results-other than this time, with its noticeably milder flavor.

Is the veining or absence of responsibe for this?  Is it a rule of thumb that when buying dolce to look for pronounced veining as indicative of intense or depth of flavor?  Is there an inference here that would apply to all veined cheese?

Hi there Joe-

Blue cheese is a pretty simple beast - the more blue you see, the stronger the blue flavor (the "intensity" of blue cheese comes from the amount of mold present). For instance, check out the mold pockets of a nice mature Roquefort and compare to the delicate veining of a Gorgonzola Dolce. The latter is indeed a fabulous cooking cheese - it melts beautifully and its veininess (yes, I know that isn't an actual word) will blend nicely. I'm not a big fan of crunchy blue mold when I'm snacking or cooking with blues. That's why I like cooking with Dolce. The down side is that unless it's nicely mature, you're going to find a major lack in kick. Dolce is called "Dolce" for a reason - it is considered "sweet". If you get a mature one, you've hit the jackpot - great cooking texture, nice oomph. It sounds like the Dolce you picked up was really young. Probably great for snacking, but not quite ballsy enough for cooking.

In reference to your rule of thumb, when looking for a more sharp blue cheese, look for more blue. One of the best gorgonzolas I've had (and the one I carry in the shop) is from Belgioso in Wisconsin. Yes, I know it's not Italian. Yes, I know it's not "Artisan" - but man, is it good. Also, don't be afraid to try other creamy, mildish blues - some of the Americans are wonderful because they not only have nice blueing, but the "cheese" part adds interesting flavor and dimension.

Good luck with future risotto pursuits!

I've eaten a lot of bleu cheese including a number in Italy, one of which I carried back on blue ice (I've also done this with eppouisses (sp?) and seveal Neal's Yard cheeses). Mauri has proven to be a consistently strong flavor which I've gone out of my way to find. (I have not tried Belgioso-yet) The veining was notably lighter this particular time and, because I had it cut, did not actually see it since it was wrapped behind the counter. Yet the flavor was MUCH milder than I expected and a real disappointment.

You may find this interesting, it's a post of mine from about three years ago:

http://www.chowhound.com/boards/general13/...ages/41002.html

Thanks.

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