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snoopy64

Taillevent vs. Grand Vefour

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Hi everybody,

you can see here very nice pictures of what Taillevent looks like and what kind of food is served :

http://www.pbase.com/stevezzzz/taillevent&page=all

You can also find quotes excerpted from the delightful book "A Meal Observed" by Andrew Todhunter.

Bon appétit!

Serge

Thanks Serge,

Btw, I really like the book 'A Meal Observed'!

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Thank you very much, serge. Very pleasing and informative photos. I would also note that Taillevent at lunch seems to offer incredible value for money, particularly if you consider that it is in Paris, and in a fashionable part of Paris at that.

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Please give me your list of brasseries serving food equivalent to Taillevent. I have been going there through the reigns of Philippe Legendre, Michel Del Burgo and recently Alain Soliveres and it has always been of supremely consistent quality. I attribute this to the very hands on, second generation owner, M. Vrinat, who is the epitome of understated grace and charm, and the main reason Taillevent has remained at the top of nearly every guide for years on end. I have eaten upstairs and down, and my only preference is to not be immediately under the staircase. I don't consider(nor desire) the cuisine to be as daring as that of the remarkable Pierre Gagnaire, but it has always been based on the best products available, with variations on classics. Since I only get to dine there about once a year, it is comforting to know that their signature dishes, such as the lobster sausage will be available. As for service, one trip we were seated in one of the upstairs rooms and a 3 generation family with about a 6 yr. old boy was graciously seated near us. The head waiter discussed possible special meals for the boy. He was served at the time the adults got their appetisers and the waiter cut up the meat dish for him, brought his dessert without much wait, then arranged two chairs together and brought a blanket and pillow so he could nap through his family's meal. Another time we were greeted by name by a waiter we had met previously at Le Violon d'Ingres, who was not even assigned to our room.

There can always be off nights no matter the restaurant...Guy Savoy forgetting to refill our wine glasses, surliness from one waiter at L'Ambroisie, being too close to a large group of chattering, chain smoking Japanese at Le Grand Vefour, icy service at Le Carre des feuillants, etc.,etc. Perfection is unattainable but Jean Claude Vrinat keeps it as his goal.


Edited by Laidback (log)

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Does anyone have any updated thoughts on Grand Vefour since these 2004 postings, above?

The only other thread I found was a "Grand Vefour on Sopranos" one.

Or, comparisons to Taillevent, if you will.

Thank you.

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Does anyone have any updated thoughts on Grand Vefour since these 2004 postings, above?

The only other thread I found was a "Grand Vefour on Sopranos" one.

Or, comparisons to Taillevent, if you will.

Thank you.

Well, if the rumours are correct, they will both loose their third Michelin star this year. I would consider this an extremely unfair rating in both cases, should recent reports turn out to be true. Both restaurants are still excellent and have not gone down in quality or service, their only "mistake" could perhaps be that others have become even better.

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Does anyone have any updated thoughts on Grand Vefour since these 2004 postings, above?

The only other thread I found was a "Grand Vefour on Sopranos" one.

Or, comparisons to Taillevent, if you will.

Thank you.

Neither of them are at the top of my list for the food, but they are impressive as part of French history and the old-school 3-star establishments (even though they've both been demoted to "lowly" two-stars this year)

Grand Vefour is of course where Napoleon ate and is ornate as hell... Just sitting in there is an experience...

Taillevent is one of those places you really should experience... Upon entering, you are greeted by about 2-3 dozen different people with "bonjour messieur"... It's really quite fatiguing by the time you get to your table :)

Again, the food at both of these places is only average for a Michelin restaurant... But it's worth the experience if you have already done a 3-star with amazing food (like savoy or whatever)

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(even though they've both been demoted to "lowly" two-stars this year)

BackwardsHat,

just for the record - Grand Véfour has managed to maintain its three stars this year despite all rumours. In the case of Taillevent of course, the rumours were true. It is now the best two star restaurant of Paris :-)

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ameiden,

Maybe we should start adding our own stars to the present two stars...Taillevent would be the best three star, two star restaurant in Paris!! Certainly a great many of us feel that way.....

Joan

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(even though they've both been demoted to "lowly" two-stars this year)

BackwardsHat,

just for the record - Grand Véfour has managed to maintain its three stars this year despite all rumours. In the case of Taillevent of course, the rumours were true. It is now the best two star restaurant of Paris :-)

Ah, I stand corrected! Personally, I think if either one should have been demoted it should have been grand vefour... But I dunno, when you get to that level of restaurant, it's really splitting hairs...

Hmmmm, all this talk of Taillevent makes me want to go back when I'm there this spring or maybe fall! lol... It's been a while since I had that massive pressed duck dish... :cool:

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I completely missed "digesting" Patricia Wells article on Taillevent's demotion in the February 27th IHT. Apologies. She says while she never considered it the best resto in the world, it is the best run and she applauds the other Michelin decisions.

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Taillevent is a dining landmark in Paris and has been respected for years, even now. However, people hardly talk about it anymore ever since this iconic restaurant lost Michelin’s 3rd star about a decade ago, albeit it’s still quite reputable and managed to maintain the 2-star awards. I visited Taillevent, located not too far from Champs-Elysses, last May. The restaurant used to be a private mansion and it has a classy entrance and elegant dining room design. I was seated at the Lamennais dining room – the one with plenty of wooden panels and some modern artworks. The atmosphere was comfortable and soothing; the dining room was only half filled and I was seated in the sofa during my lunch.    

 

I was told that it was the last week of morels season and I decided to order a seasonal tasting menu focusing on asparagus and morel mushrooms ingredients. They did not seem to be too ‘heavy’ as there was no meat course. I was impressed with:

-Anjou green asparagus (crisp yet tender and delectable) served on acidic verjus jelly (like a fine ‘vinegar sauce’) and with briny caviars. The presentation was exquisite

-My main course was a perfectly executed turbot. The fish was cooked by keeping the middle bone and fat; this way added unique and delicious flavors. The sauce was also tasty, made of white wine & fish bone. As expected, the side dishes were asparagus and morels but the Turbot simply outshone them

-I also liked the gougeres served at the beginning. Possibly the best one I’ve eaten since the old days of L’Ambroisie

 

The food was generally very good although Alain Soliveres was not in the kitchen that day. The 2-star is certainly well deserved. It may get 3-star one day if the Michelin inspectors were in good moods during their secretive visit … The service was smooth, respectful and polished. The staffs, all gentlemen, were always around whenever you need something; most of them spoke good English.       

 

More detailed review: http://zhangyuqisfoodjourneys.blogspot.co.id/2017/06/taillevent-alain-soliveres.html

 

Meal photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/7124357@N03/sets/72157682059513233/with/35223664866/

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