Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edit History

boilsover

boilsover

53 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Though perhaps my terminology is wrong?  What I mildly objected to is the part of the knife Wusthof calls the "finger guard".  I had always thought of this part of the knife as the bolster. 

 

Not wrong, but the terminology gets blurred.  A "bolster" is usually understood to be an added piece ahead of the handle scale or through-handle designed to buttress the handle and prevent corrosion.  It can be a separate piece, soldered, pinned, and/or glued on, OR it can be "integral" with the blade/tang, i.e., forged or ground into the assembly.

 

Bolsters can include finger guards or not.   And the guards can go all the way to the heel or not.  I agree that the classic Euro bolster that descends all the way to the heel is a PITA because (a)  sooner or later, successive sharpenings will result in a lack of board contact near the heel, leading to accordion cuts; and (b) the typical cook cannot properly reduce the mass of metal at the heel to fix it.  I have 4 paring knives out for professional sharpening because the bolsters also need taking down to make the edge profiles convex.

 

A full height bolster/guard also gives some added support to the blade when the knife is twisted.  But most modern steels, properly heat-treated don't really need this.

 

I think Big Knife persists with this full-height design mostly because people expect it in $$ cutlery.  They also do it as a risk management strategy.  They could simply put a large choil in the blade ahead of a minimal bolster and completely solve the resharpening PITA and have some safety insurance.  

boilsover

boilsover

33 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Though perhaps my terminology is wrong?  What I mildly objected to is the part of the knife Wusthof calls the "finger guard".  I had always thought of this part of the knife as the bolster. 

 

Not wrong, but the terminology gets blurred.  A "bolster" is usually understood to be an added piece ahead of the handle scale or through-handle designed to buttress the handle and prevent corrosion.  It can be a separate piece, soldered, pinned, and/or glued on, OR it can be "integral" with the blade/tang, i.e., forged or ground into the assembly.

 

Bolsters can include finger guards or not.   And the guards can go all the way to the heel or not.  I agree that the classic Euro bolster that descends all the way to the heel is a PITA because (a)  sooner or later, successive sharpenings will result in a lack of board contact near the heel, leading to accordion cuts; and (b) the typical cook cannot properly reduce the mass of metal at the heel to fix it.  I have 4 paring knives out for professional sharpening because the bolsters also need taking down to make the edge profiles convex.

 

A full height bolster/guard also gives some added support to the blade when the knife is twisted.  But most modern steels, properly heat-treated don't really need this.

 

I think Big Knife persists with this full-height design mostly because people expect it in $$ cutlery.  They also do it as a risk management strategy.  They could simply put a large choil in the blade ahead of a minimal bolster and completely solve the resharpening PITA and have some safety insurance.  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×